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We have an almost 4 year old male Lhasa Apso that we obtained 4 months ago. We are now deciding whether to have him neutered. I read numerous threads, pros & cons, but these were mainly focused on puppies. Our dog, Rusty, shows no signs of aggression towards other dogs (males & females / fixed & unfixed). He is also house trained and has never marked in our house since we’ve had him. However, he does mark outside when he goes on his two daily walks. He also gets lots of playtime with my children. We live in a secure neighborhood well away from traffic with other very responsible dog owners. Any comments and / or suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance :)
 

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Don't neuter him. There's really no medical or behavioral need to do so. It sounds like you maintain him fine. He's fine. Altered dogs have higher risks for many health problems. Research it carefully. You shouldn't alter 'just because', or for your conveniences, or out of fear of what might happen.

Train him well, and maintain him, and you should be fine.
 

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Personally I think ALL dogs except those used for breeding by RESPONCIBLE breeders should be neutered/spayed. Male dogs have been known to travel MILES, break through doors, windows, scale fences to get to a female in heat. If your dog happens to get loose once and happens to find a female in heat, there are more puppies in the world. Even the best owner in the world sometimes looses a dog. Male dogs are worse when they are intact because they will dart out of your house when they can smell a female in heat.

There are also many health advantages for neutering him. Less chance of cancer, less chance of him getting hit by random cars (because he's not going after females in heat) and such things like that.

I vote Neuter...
 

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I vote neuter. There's also less chance of theft by someone that wants to use him for breeding.
 

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I vote neuter. There's also less chance of theft by someone that wants to use him for breeding.
^^ That's a very real risk for unaltered purebreds, especially small breeds. I've known a few small dogs that "disappeared" and were never found, and the local Humane Society says that the local puppymills are not above buying small unaltered purebreds from shady sources.

I don't think you have any behavioral or medical reason to neuter him. Just the petnapping risk. And, if he EVER gets out, neutering will prevent a paternity suit ( :p ). Most pet dogs do get out at least once in their lives.

My boys were around 4 when neutered. It's not a problem at that age.
 

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I say they are never to old to benifit from being neutered. Neutering you older male can help prevent one very obvious cancer: TESTICULAR CANCER. No testicles = no cancer. Also the are more risk with the prostate if he remains unneutered. Also the longer he is exposed to testosterone the more chance he has of developing the aggressive behaviours that go along with unneutered males. I say neuter.
 

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Neuter! My grandparents had a lhasa and never had him neutered. He was great at first but the older he got, the more aggressive he got. I truly believe it was because he was unaltered. I've also noticed that neutered males seem to be less tolerant of an intact male. So if you're going to have him around other dogs, it might be a good safety precaution.

But the very best reason to get him neutered is to prevent an unwanted litter. There are SO many dogs that die everyday in the shelters. And no matter how carefully you watch him, it only takes him getting out one time for it to happen. I say, be part of the solution, not the problem. :)
 

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I say they are never to old to benifit from being neutered. Neutering you older male can help prevent one very obvious cancer: TESTICULAR CANCER. No testicles = no cancer. Also the are more risk with the prostate if he remains unneutered. Also the longer he is exposed to testosterone the more chance he has of developing the aggressive behaviours that go along with unneutered males. I say neuter.

The aggression factor is a moot point if the dog is 4 years old and not having problems and I've actually had males become MORE aggressive after nuetering. The fact is, Thyroid imbalance is far more likely to cause aggression issues than leaving a dog intact. Nuetering will also not stop a dog from marking outside, my Frank was nuetered at 6 months and STILL marks. It also does nothing for humping as humping starts before any sexual hormones kick in and is more of a exciteable behavior than anything.

The facts are, that Spay/Nueter has ONE reason and one reason only, BIRTH CONTROL. That goal can be reached just as easily by being a responsible owner. Yes, there is the side effect of reducing reproductive cancers because it removes the organs involved in reproduction, however, there are some studies that show that it may increase the chances of other cancers such as Osteosarcomas, which are far more likely to cost your dog it's life.
 

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The facts are, that Spay/Nueter has ONE reason and one reason only, BIRTH CONTROL. That goal can be reached just as easily by being a responsible owner. Yes, there is the side effect of reducing reproductive cancers because it removes the organs involved in reproduction, however, there are some studies that show that it may increase the chances of other cancers such as Osteosarcomas, which are far more likely to cost your dog it's life.
Perhaps you need to re-read up on the benefits of spaying and neutering. For your convenience I have attached a couple of links.

http://www.oregonvma.org/petowners/spayneuter.asp

http://warrentonkc.tripod.com/spayneut.htm

http://www.sniksnak.com/benefits.html

http://www.uvma.org/dogs/spaying.htm

http://www.pets911.com/spayneuter/why-spay-or-neuter/

I think the above links should give you enough information about the health and behavioral benefits of spaying and neutering.
 

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I know the pro's and cons of S/N. Trust me I've read up on both sides. I'm not saying that it shouldn't be done, but that it should be an INFORMED decision.

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/spayneut.html
drawbacks specific to spay surgery include increased incidence of bladder incontinence, triple the frequency of thyroid disease, and higher risk of some cancers, joint problems, and obesity and adverse reactions to vaccinations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=12433723
Male and female dogs that underwent gonadectomy before 1 year of age had an approximate one in four lifetime risk for bone sarcoma and were significantly more likely to develop bone sarcoma than dogs that were sexually intact [RR +/-95% CI = 3.8 (1.5-9.2) for males; RR +/-95% CI = 3.1 (1.1-8.3) for females].
http://dogtorj.tripod.com/id79.html
Altered Females:

- Increased aggression in altered females. (recent study)

- Increased occurrence of urinary calculi.

- Increased difficulty passing urinary calculi.

- Increased likelihood of vulvar pyoderma (urine scald)

- Increased likelihood of urinary incontinence.

- Increased likelihood of adverse reaction to vaccinations (27-38%).

- Notable decrease of activity/drive. (this is important to those whose animals aren't just pets but are trained to do work too)

- Increased chance of "perpetual puppy syndrome" undesirable urination.

- Inhibited social adjustment if spayed prior to complete cognitive development (usually a good time AFTER sexual maturity).

- Substantial likelihood of appreciable demeanor change after spay (menopausal women know about hormone drop.. it's not fun)

- Increased likelihood of cognitive disorders if spayed before sexual maturity.

- Increased likelihood of, or speeded progress of, degenerative osteological disorders.

- Notable decrease in muscle mass (again, not all dogs are lawn ornaments or carpet speedbumps)

- Generally live 2 (or greater) years shorter than unaltered littermates in controlled studies.


Altered males:
- Increased occurrence of urinary calculi.

- Increased difficulty passing urinary calculi.

- Increased chance of urinary obstruction.

- Increased likelihood of urinary incontinence.

- Increased likelihood of adverse reaction to vaccinations (27-38%).

- Notable decrease in activity/drive. (same as above in female list)

- Increased chance of "perpetual puppy syndrome" undesirable urination.

- Inhibited social adjustment if castrated prior to sexual maturity.

- Substantial likelihood of appreciable demeanor change after castration (same concept as above in female list... reproductive hormones affect more than just reproduction).

- Increased likelihood of cognitive disorders if castrated before complete cognitive development (usually a good time AFTER sexual maturity).

- Notable decrease in muscle mass (yep, same as above)

- Generally live 2 (or greater) years shorter than unaltered littermates in controlled studies
Studies on the link between S/N and hypersenstivity to vaccines

__http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.2005.227.1102?prevSearch=

(http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.2005.227.1102?prevSearch=a)
llfield%3A%28Adverse+Events+Diagnosed+Within+3+Days%29_

(http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.2005.227.1102?prevSearch=allfield:)


 

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As a child, my immediate family didn't have pets, but my grandparents did. None of them were altered because that wasn't the trend at the time. Despite my grandparents being fairly attentive and responsible people, the two male dogs used to escape the yard on a regular basis and the female had two "oops" litters.

As an adult, all five of my animals (four dogs and a cat) have been fixed. The living ones are eight and five. The deceased died of old age at 13 years, a brain tumor at 12 years, and cancer of the spleen at 8 years.

Long story short, anecdotal evidence has shown me that it's possible for an altered animal to live a long and healthy life, but it's impossible to keep an unaltered animal from getting pregnant/getting another animal pregnant.

I realize this isn't true, but it is something for the average pet owner to consider.
 

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immpossible to keep an unaltered pet from producing off spring? Don't think so, my Mome last GSD was put down at 14 years old, he was never altered and never produced a litte. The only reason he was put down is because he refused to eat after my Mom passed, at 14 he was as healthy as most dogs half his age. The only dog my mom nuetered passed at five years old due to bone cancer.

Oh, and I'm sorry, but I don't think that published research from the AVMA is 'anecdotal' nor does my vet who's among the top 5% of vets accordi g to AVMA standards.
 
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