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Hi. New here looking for advice from someone who's had experience with severe on set of anxiety in there pups.
Daisy and I have been living in an apartment for year and a half now and about 4 months ago the landlords had renovated the floors above us. Unfortunately I was at work while happening and noticed immediately something was wrong but couldn't figure it out. Wasn't till I had a day off did I find out the cause was.
Once the reno was done it took a couple days but she was back to normal. Once the apartment was filled she started getting anxiety again when they would do certain things walk with shoes on etc. But that started to go away and thing were looking good again. Now idk what has triggered it but now being inside are apartment at all she immediately whats to run to her safe place and seems to feel no safety in are house at all.
The vet recommended some meds but I'm not a big fan of doping her up with Prozac etc.
My question would to anyone who's had this severe anxiety problem if she may start to be more comfortable and if I move is the problem just going to follow?
Trying some cbd oil today so see how that works.
Thx for listening
 

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It's hard to say whether this behavior developed because of the reno exclusively or she's genetically anxious and she's just exhibiting symptoms now. It might be a little of both.

Because of the severity of the anxiety, I would consider the medication. If she's immediately going to her safe place even in her own home, she's likely over threshold and can't learn that the people walking above her are not going to hurt her. Once the edge is taken off her fear, she can be in a place to learn. There are different medications and dosages so they're not "doped up", just not constantly afraid of existing. Additionally, you can't really control the people above you. For now, it's probably better that she's on something to help, because I don't imagine you can be home any time the upstairs neighbors are home to work with her.

When you are home, though, and you hear people walking around, throw some delicious treats (if she's not taking them, that can be another indicator that she's way over threshold and not in the frame of mind to learn). The idea is that she learns noises from upstairs = treats.

Many dogs are weaned off medication depending on the severity of their anxiety, too, because once they are in the proper frame of mind to learn and have gained those coping skills, they don't require the medication anymore. I think you should discuss this with your vet more, or even consider a behaviorist or trainer specializing in anxiety since this is kind of a tricky situation where you are completely unable to control the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's hard to say whether this behavior developed because of the reno exclusively or she's genetically anxious and she's just exhibiting symptoms now. It might be a little of both.

Because of the severity of the anxiety, I would consider the medication. If she's immediately going to her safe place even in her own home, she's likely over threshold and can't learn that the people walking above her are not going to hurt her. Once the edge is taken off her fear, she can be in a place to learn. There are different medications and dosages so they're not "doped up", just not constantly afraid of existing. Additionally, you can't really control the people above you. For now, it's probably better that she's on something to help, because I don't imagine you can be home any time the upstairs neighbors are home to work with her.

When you are home, though, and you hear people walking around, throw some delicious treats (if she's not taking them, that can be another indicator that she's way over threshold and not in the frame of mind to learn). The idea is that she learns noises from upstairs = treats.

Many dogs are weaned off medication depending on the severity of their anxiety, too, because once they are in the proper frame of mind to learn and have gained those coping skills, they don't require the medication anymore. I think you should discuss this with your vet more, or even consider a behaviorist or trainer specializing in anxiety since this is kind of a tricky situation where you are completely unable to control the trigger.
It's hard to say whether this behavior developed because of the reno exclusively or she's genetically anxious and she's just exhibiting symptoms now. It might be a little of both.

Because of the severity of the anxiety, I would consider the medication. If she's immediately going to her safe place even in her own home, she's likely over threshold and can't learn that the people walking above her are not going to hurt her. Once the edge is taken off her fear, she can be in a place to learn. There are different medications and dosages so they're not "doped up", just not constantly afraid of existing. Additionally, you can't really control the people above you. For now, it's probably better that she's on something to help, because I don't imagine you can be home any time the upstairs neighbors are home to work with her.

When you are home, though, and you hear people walking around, throw some delicious treats (if she's not taking them, that can be another indicator that she's way over threshold and not in the frame of mind to learn). The idea is that she learns noises from upstairs = treats.

Many dogs are weaned off medication depending on the severity of their anxiety, too, because once they are in the proper frame of mind to learn and have gained those coping skills, they don't require the medication anymore. I think you should discuss this with your vet more, or even consider a behaviorist or trainer specializing in anxiety since this is kind of a tricky situation where you are completely unable to control the trigger.
She is a collie so she is prone to anxiety. I'm just hoping that if we move away from the scary place so to speak lol that it won't follow. When we're outside walking or at the park she's her normal self but even when we're getting close to home I see her tail go down and she starts becoming hesitant. She 2 and a half now and never was a problem before the reno so I'm hoping a townhouse or house will ease the anxiety 🤞🤞
Appreciate your help thank you
 

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I'm trying to understand why you don't want to use prescription medications that have a lot of studies and research behind them regarding safety and efficacy, but are willing to use something that hasn't been as well studied, and has mostly only anecdotal evidence of being helpful.
 
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I'm trying to understand why you don't want to use prescription medications that have a lot of studies and research behind them regarding safety and efficacy, but are willing to use something that hasn't been as well studied, and has mostly only anecdotal evidence of being
I'm trying to understand why you don't want to use prescription medications that have a lot of studies and research behind them regarding safety and efficacy, but are willing to use something that hasn't been as well studied, and has mostly only anecdotal evidence of being helpful.
I wouldn't put my children or myself on those drugs so why would I do that with my dog?
 

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She is a collie so she is prone to anxiety. I'm just hoping that if we move away from the scary place so to speak lol that it won't follow. When we're outside walking or at the park she's her normal self but even when we're getting close to home I see her tail go down and she starts becoming hesitant. She 2 and a half now and never was a problem before the reno so I'm hoping a townhouse or house will ease the anxiety 🤞🤞
Appreciate your help thank you
It might...or it might not.

If it were my dog, I would be addressing this and not ignoring it. Best outcome is you move and the dog forgets. The worst outcome is you move, the dog is still afraid of noises outside the home, and it will probably be worse because now she's in a new place and didn't receive any medical intervention or training to equip her to handle her anxiety.

Although I don't have your exact problem, I do have an Aussie/Collie mix with his own set of issues, and I can say from experience that these types of things don't just go away. There are lots of situations where I will say "just ignore the dog" but this isn't one of them...
 

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I wouldn't put my children or myself on those drugs so why would I do that with my dog?
I guess I just can't see letting a dog (or child) suffer from a condition where medication could help. If your dog had severe arthritis, would you refuse to put them on painkillers? If your child had Type I diabetes, would you not give them insulin? I don't know why so many people are so resistant to using medications that could help with mental and/or emotional issues (well, yes, actually, I do, but that's another story).
 
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Here's a great article, written by a vet, about the use of medication for behavior: Behavior Medication: First-Line Therapy Or Last Resort?

No one is saying meds fix the problem or are good for every dog. But if your personal vet is recommending it, what is the harm in trying? Not wanting to try meds for personal reasons is putting your personal bias (founded on what evidence?) over a dog's well being. There is still a huge stigma around many dog things like medication, muzzles, etc. But we ask our dogs to live in extremely 'artificial' (to a canine) constructs and expect them to cope like humans do - and many humans struggle too. So it's no wonder that many dogs in modern day society require more help via training and sometimes medication to adjust to their daily lives.
 

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Hi. New here looking for advice from someone who's had experience with severe on set of anxiety in there pups.
Daisy and I have been living in an apartment for year and a half now and about 4 months ago the landlords had renovated the floors above us. Unfortunately I was at work while happening and noticed immediately something was wrong but couldn't figure it out. Wasn't till I had a day off did I find out the cause was.
Once the reno was done it took a couple days but she was back to normal. Once the apartment was filled she started getting anxiety again when they would do certain things walk with shoes on etc. But that started to go away and thing were looking good again. Now idk what has triggered it but now being inside are apartment at all she immediately whats to run to her safe place and seems to feel no safety in are house at all.
The vet recommended some meds but I'm not a big fan of doping her up with Prozac etc.
My question would to anyone who's had this severe anxiety problem if she may start to be more comfortable and if I move is the problem just going to follow?
Trying some cbd oil today so see how that works.
Thx for listening
Dear Matt, here is what I feel ( please take it or leave it) your dog is one of the most intelligent dogs there is. it sounds like she was scared by the sounds above. But not about herself. She is worrying about your wellbeing. One of most wonderful tricks in this case is when you hear your Daisy getting worried, tell her: “it’s ok Daisy”. Repeat it. Hug her. Repeat it. She will watch and listen to you. Redirect her attention. Pat her through those sounds. Worse case scenario, after you tell her it’s ok, and she is still going nuts, take her to the bathroom with lights and let her sit there for like 15 min. She should calm down. I watched it on youtube.
my morkie Sadie learned how to relax when she goes to the room and sit there by herself for like 15 min.
plus a lot of love. I would not give her any medications. at least give her a chance!
and again, i feel that she is trying to protect YOU.
 

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I wouldn't put my children or myself on those drugs so why would I do that with my dog?
As someone who suffers from anxiety and takes Prozac, I guess I'm lucky my parents had a different mindset than you. Prozac has saved me, literally. And honestly, based on your description of it ("doping") you don't really understand it anyway - that isn't how SSRIs work, at all.

CBD is more likely to have a doping effect, and may not be helpful anyway.

Do as you will, but you need to move past those biases for your dog as well as humanity at large.
 

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Hi. New here looking for advice from someone who's had experience with severe on set of anxiety in there pups.
Daisy and I have been living in an apartment for year and a half now and about 4 months ago the landlords had renovated the floors above us. Unfortunately I was at work while happening and noticed immediately something was wrong but couldn't figure it out. Wasn't till I had a day off did I find out the cause was.
Once the reno was done it took a couple days but she was back to normal. Once the apartment was filled she started getting anxiety again when they would do certain things walk with shoes on etc. But that started to go away and thing were looking good again. Now idk what has triggered it but now being inside are apartment at all she immediately whats to run to her safe place and seems to feel no safety in are house at all.
The vet recommended some meds but I'm not a big fan of doping her up with Prozac etc.
My question would to anyone who's had this severe anxiety problem if she may start to be more comfortable and if I move is the problem just going to follow?
Trying some cbd oil today so see how that works.
Thx for listening
Thank you we have the same problem withour chuihua puppy a toy adn he just chews eveythign in site I had to carbord some places off like unnder the couach are you saying let him have that back but he will chew at the small obsticales under neath,>?:unsure:
 
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