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Ok so starting in December, I am moving back in with my mother, not for monetary reasons, just because she owns 18 acres and needs some help. so anyway, she used to be heavily into breeding Australian Cattle Dogs, but hasn't for about 10 years. so anyway, she has 11 kennels, 11 runs and 10 acres of her land is set up for dogs basically, she even has a vet examination room. so I was thinking that maybe once i move back and set everything up, back to standard, that i could maybe become a small no kill shelter, taking in 8 dogs at a time. I know there's a lot involved, but i've only ever worked for government run kill shelters, and don't know exactly how setting up one of these shelters work....so that's where you guys come in, has anyone done this before, so that they can sort of give me a run down, of what's involved. I was thinking of going breed specific, but i don't think that would be fare on other breeds..
 

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one thing with this being a no kill shelter you have to make the decision. are you going to take in dogs on a first come first serve basis or are you going to have specific requirements for the type of dogs you accept.
 

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Sounds good on paper... Good luck.

If I were you, I'd start breed specific if you can only take in 8 dogs at a time.
 

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With those kinds of limitations, I think it would be better to become a foster home for an established rescue group instead of trying to start your own.....the whole non-profit thing can get complicated. Any local rescue group/shelter should be thrilled to have your help.
 

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that was an option, but where i am moving, there is only government run shelters. I am looking to build out eventually, but just starting small, and then expand later, I never really liked the idea of fostering.
 

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No small rescue groups at all? That's fairly unusual. Most places have at least one small grass-roots type rescue going. Are you considering getting a non-profit or simply taking in strays/unwanted pets, fixing them up, and adopting them out? Anyone can do that and I doubt you'd need anything special (unless the county is zoned....then you might need permits). But if you want to go all out and create your own actual shelter, there are a lot of considerations. Best Friends has seminars on how to do it, but they aren't cheap.
 

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No small rescue groups at all? That's fairly unusual. Most places have at least one small grass-roots type rescue going. Are you considering getting a non-profit or simply taking in strays/unwanted pets, fixing them up, and adopting them out? Anyone can do that and I doubt you'd need anything special (unless the county is zoned....then you might need permits). But if you want to go all out and create your own actual shelter, there are a lot of considerations. Best Friends has seminars on how to do it, but they aren't cheap.
In Australia, it's illegal to keep strays or unwanted pets without being a rescue/shelter. I would want to rescue, train and adopt out.
 

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Being in Australia changed the whole face of the thing. I do not know the financial laws in Australia but here is a bit of advice that does not come from the heart, but from the head.. and it may not be viewed favorably. Then again, I may be preaching to the choir and if that is so, tell me to just go and sit down.

If you want this to work, expand and be successful, set yourself up FIRST with a business plan. Even a Non Profit No kill shelter needs to be run like a business insofar as funding resurces and accounting goes. You need to plan for expense and income and be able to produce a statement. Know the laws. Understand everything you can about availability of grants or other incentives for your particular type of NPO. Find out what the tax advantages are for YOU and for those donating money or time or both.

Calculate the time it will take now, and in expansion, to really care for the animals. Be realistic. Consider paid staff and how paid staff will be supported both financially and benefits.. time off etc. Even if you are sick or disabled, the dogs have to be cared for and the business must go on. Consider liability and insurance (not sure how this works in Australia). Consider volunteers with the insurance. Volunteers are an asset but insurance may view them as a liability.

Last, but not least, have an Exit Plan. You may not want to exit and you may never need to exit, but every good business plant has an exit plan and strategy along with a realistic balance sheet.

After you have come at this like a business and have the thing on paper and figured out.. know the laws for taxes and finances.. know the resources for funding and can honestly estimate both the income and the outlay, you will be ready to accept your first dog.

Good Luck.
 

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With those kinds of limitations, I think it would be better to become a foster home for an established rescue group instead of trying to start your own.....the whole non-profit thing can get complicated. Any local rescue group/shelter should be thrilled to have your help.
I agree, if you take in that limited amount of dogs, you might as well help out your local shelter by fostering the adoptable dogs so they can take in more animals (don't your government run shelter have a foster program?) - besides there is not really a difference between fostering and sheltering.

There are a few things you need to consider before starting a no kill shelther and one of them is that you are not putting a time limit on the animals'stays. It means you will not euthanize animals to free up space... it means you may be housing animals for months or years before they find a home. You may even be responsible for some animals until they pass away. (and this could easily happen with the first 8 you take in)... essentially... you could have helped more animals by fostering the adoptable animals from your local animal shelter.

Animals need socialization and animals living in animal shelters often develop behavioral problems due to extended stays in the shelter cages. Are you ready to deal with those issues on a daily basis?

No-kill... I get it... but you need to consider that you might find animals who are suffering greatly and beyond medical help. There will be some with behavioral problems that cannot be fixed. How will you handle these? You'll need someone who can evaluate the quality of life for the animals in question, and a trusted veterinarian who can help.

Also animals in shelters are prone to diseases... are you capable of handling/controling those diseases?

Honestly... If I were you I'd think REALLY HARD and REALLY LONG before starting a no-kill shelter. You might be able to help more animals if you just supported your local animal shelter.

Here's a few article you can read before you should consider starting a no kill shelter:
http://www.hsus.org/pets/animal_shelters/what_to_do_if_you_have_concerns_about_your_local_shelter.html

http://www.hsus.org/pets/animal_shelters/how_to_get_involved.html

http://www.petfinder.com/how-to-help-pets/starting-nonprofit-help-animals.html

http://www.petfinder.com/how-to-help-pets/start-animal-shelter.html

http://www.animalsheltering.org/resource_library/magazine_articles/jul_aug_1996/parvo_factsheet.pdf
 
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