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How does a person go about certifying a dog as a Service Dog? I was asked by my trainer, as she wasn't sure about how. She's got a friend with a Chiwawa that alerts the wife if the husband is having a minor seizure, and they are now inquiring about getting him certified so they can take the Chiwawa everywhere with them. They are in Washington State as well, about an hour away from us. Any info is appreciated. I did find the site http://registeredservicedogs.com , is this all they need, or is there training needed before certifying? The dog is well trained, up-to-date on all shots, etc, and is a people loving dog with no aggressiveness at all. Thanks....
 

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How does a person go about certifying a dog as a Service Dog?
There is no requirement for certification under the ADA, nor are there any groups or individuals who are "it" in terms of getting one's dog "certified" as a SD (Service Dog). There are guidelines regarding standards of behavior and trained tasks, which you can find on the IAADP (International Association of Assistance Dog Partners) website, or Delta Society. SDs obtained from programs will be "certified" by that program, as dogs who perform tasks that mitigate the disability or disabilities of the handler the dog is paired with.


I was asked by my trainer, as she wasn't sure about how. She's got a friend with a Chiwawa that alerts the wife if the husband is having a minor seizure, and they are now inquiring about getting him certified so they can take the Chiwawa everywhere with them.
In order to have the right to public access with a dog trained to mitigate a disability, the person has to first be a qualified person with a disability as defined by the ADA.

When the ADA was passed by Congress and signed into law, there was no question that people with seizure disorders were covered by and protected by this civil rights law. However, the automatic ADA protection of people with seizure disorders changed subsequent to the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) in the case known as UAL v. Sutton. In that case two sisters sued under the ADA for the right to be airline pilots with United Airlines. They did not meet the 20/20 uncorrected vision requirement for new hire pilots of this airline having very bad vision, but vision that corrected to 20/20 with glasses and with contact lenses. This case went to the SCOTUS which used this case to issue an expansive ruling that changed the protections of the ADA for millions of people.

The SCOTUS ruled that in determining if a person is disabled, appliances and medications that serve to mitigate the impairment on which a person's disability is based must be taken into consideration. This directly contradicts the position taken by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the agency charged by Congress to be the author of the ADA Title II and Title III regulatory law. In the ADA Title III Technical Assistance Manual published by DOJ in 1993 they stated:"If a person's impairment is greatly lessened or eliminated through the use of
aids or devices, would the person still be considered an individual with a disability?

Whether a person has a disability is determined without regard to the availability of mitigating measures, such as reasonable modifications,
auxiliary aids and services, services or devices of a personal nature, or medication. For example, a person with severe hearing loss is substantially limited in the major life activity of hearing, even though the loss may be improved through the use of a hearing aid. Likewise, persons with impairments, such as epilepsy or diabetes, that, if untreated, would substantially limit a major life activity, are still individuals with disabilities under the ADA, even if the debilitating consequences of the impairment are controlled by medication."

However the SCOTUS ignored the opinion of the agency charged by Congress to develop this regulatory law, and concluded that appliances and medications that mitigate a person's impairment shall be taken into consideration in the determination of whether a person with a physical or mental impairment is disabled under the standards of the ADA

Within a year of so of the UAL v. Sutton case there was an ADA Title I case before the federal court in Texas. In this case, a man who had worked for the same company for 10 years had a seizure at work. The employer immediately fired him because he was perceived as a risk. In this case the U.S. District Court ruled that, because his seizures were mitigated by medications resulting in only infrequent seizures, he did not qualify for the protection of the ADA. His firing was allowed to stand as lawful. To date, there is no case law that would support a person with a seizure disorder being protected by the ADA if the person's disorder is mitigated by medications that result in infrequent seizures.

Only a federal judge can determine if a person with a seizure disorder who, due to the mitigation of medications, has infrequent seizures, is protected by the ADA. Unless a person with a seizure disorder has seizures with a frequency resulting in the disorder "substantially limit[ing] one or more of the major life activities of such individual," it is likely that the courts would rule that the person did not qualify for the protection of the ADA.


I did find the site http://registeredservicedogs.com , is this all they need, or is there training needed before certifying? The dog is well trained, up-to-date on all shots, etc, and is a people loving dog with no aggressiveness at all. Thanks....
This site is ripping people off. There is no need or requirement for "registration" anywhere, or in any form.
 

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There is no requirement for certification under the ADA, nor are there any groups or individuals who are "it" in terms of getting one's dog "certified" as a SD (Service Dog). There are guidelines regarding standards of behavior and trained tasks, which you can find on the IAADP (International Association of Assistance Dog Partners) website, or Delta Society. SDs obtained from programs will be "certified" by that program, as dogs who perform tasks that mitigate the disability or disabilities of the handler the dog is paired with.




In order to have the right to public access with a dog trained to mitigate a disability, the person has to first be a qualified person with a disability as defined by the ADA.

When the ADA was passed by Congress and signed into law, there was no question that people with seizure disorders were covered by and protected by this civil rights law. However, the automatic ADA protection of people with seizure disorders changed subsequent to the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) in the case known as UAL v. Sutton. In that case two sisters sued under the ADA for the right to be airline pilots with United Airlines. They did not meet the 20/20 uncorrected vision requirement for new hire pilots of this airline having very bad vision, but vision that corrected to 20/20 with glasses and with contact lenses. This case went to the SCOTUS which used this case to issue an expansive ruling that changed the protections of the ADA for millions of people.

The SCOTUS ruled that in determining if a person is disabled, appliances and medications that serve to mitigate the impairment on which a person's disability is based must be taken into consideration. This directly contradicts the position taken by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the agency charged by Congress to be the author of the ADA Title II and Title III regulatory law. In the ADA Title III Technical Assistance Manual published by DOJ in 1993 they stated:"If a person's impairment is greatly lessened or eliminated through the use of
aids or devices, would the person still be considered an individual with a disability?

Whether a person has a disability is determined without regard to the availability of mitigating measures, such as reasonable modifications,
auxiliary aids and services, services or devices of a personal nature, or medication. For example, a person with severe hearing loss is substantially limited in the major life activity of hearing, even though the loss may be improved through the use of a hearing aid. Likewise, persons with impairments, such as epilepsy or diabetes, that, if untreated, would substantially limit a major life activity, are still individuals with disabilities under the ADA, even if the debilitating consequences of the impairment are controlled by medication."

However the SCOTUS ignored the opinion of the agency charged by Congress to develop this regulatory law, and concluded that appliances and medications that mitigate a person's impairment shall be taken into consideration in the determination of whether a person with a physical or mental impairment is disabled under the standards of the ADA

Within a year of so of the UAL v. Sutton case there was an ADA Title I case before the federal court in Texas. In this case, a man who had worked for the same company for 10 years had a seizure at work. The employer immediately fired him because he was perceived as a risk. In this case the U.S. District Court ruled that, because his seizures were mitigated by medications resulting in only infrequent seizures, he did not qualify for the protection of the ADA. His firing was allowed to stand as lawful. To date, there is no case law that would support a person with a seizure disorder being protected by the ADA if the person's disorder is mitigated by medications that result in infrequent seizures.

Only a federal judge can determine if a person with a seizure disorder who, due to the mitigation of medications, has infrequent seizures, is protected by the ADA. Unless a person with a seizure disorder has seizures with a frequency resulting in the disorder "substantially limit[ing] one or more of the major life activities of such individual," it is likely that the courts would rule that the person did not qualify for the protection of the ADA.




This site is ripping people off. There is no need or requirement for "registration" anywhere, or in any form.
Excellent response....

I would just add one thing...... a therapy dog is not afforded the same rights of access as a service dog...... and there is NO requirement that a service dog wear a fancy cape have a certain color leash or anything else... all a service dog must do is be specially trained to mitigate a disability.
s
 

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Well, as for that site I posted, it does not cost anything. It only costs if you want to register with them and get the certificate, patch, etc. But as for certifying, all you have to do is fill out the form, signed by both the persons doctor that proves his disability, and signed by the persons vet that proves that the dog has all re required shots, etc, that is required by law. Then you mail it in or fax it to them. But if you also want to register with them and get the other stuff, it's up to you. Thanks for all the info, will be printing it all out for her, as she's not a computer person and doesn't have a computer.
 

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It's still a scam- a dog would be just as certified if I printed out a certificate for them on toilet paper.

In addition to the dog having task training (and seizure alert is, unfortunately, a weak task, because it's hard to demonstrate it on command- more on that in a sec), it needs to be very, very well trained as far as manners go- proofed at least as well as the average competion obedience dog- only a SD's go to be that mannerly for hours at a time, not just 20 minutes or so. Additionally, the dog should be checked for health problems beyond just shots and an annual vet heck-hips, elbows, eyes, patellas and thyroid (pain problems can cause a dog to be snappy, thyroid problems can lead to unpredictable aggression, and it's just downright unethical to work a dog in pain).

Servicedogcentral.org has good info on public access standards.

I think Shalva and poodleholic covered all the other important stuff.
 

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Another point to ponder is whether or not the dog is suited for public access.


Disqualifying Factors
Any of these reasons can disqualify a dog from service dog work. These are factors you will want to rule out innitially through extensive testing before you make a choice about a particular dog.

Temperament
Aggression
Sound Sensitivity
Hyperactivity
Distractability
Fearfulness

Health
Allergies
Skin Problems
Hip or Knee Problems
Thyroid Imbalance

Other Disqualifications
Inappropriate Barking
Inappropriate Elimination
Excessive Mouthiness
Critter Chasing (cats, rabbits, or squirrels)
 

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Well, as for that site I posted, it does not cost anything. It only costs if you want to register with them and get the certificate, patch, etc. But as for certifying, all you have to do is fill out the form, signed by both the persons doctor that proves his disability, and signed by the persons vet that proves that the dog has all re required shots, etc, that is required by law. Then you mail it in or fax it to them. But if you also want to register with them and get the other stuff, it's up to you. Thanks for all the info, will be printing it all out for her, as she's not a computer person and doesn't have a computer.
You really don't need to have it certified. And frankly, by saying your dog is certified to other people, it can spread the misinformation that a SD needs to be certified. Plus that website is a scam, so I wouldn't give them the visitor traffic to their website anyways.
 

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Thread is almost 12 years old. I'm not sure if any of the participants are still on the forum.
 
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