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Just in tears!! My girl has an extreme problem with eating her stool, now she is resource guarding it to keep me from picking it up She eats so much of it she throws it up than guards the throw up from me for she can eat that too. Please do not tell me some dogs just do this. This is not normal! She has been to the vet, i tried forbid, the pineapple and pumpkin NOTHING IS WORKING. I need some answers. It is horrible the amount of throw up she ate! Really am concerned about this. Please be kind an only answer if you have an answer an experience with this
 

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You're right that this behavior is outside the normal range of poop eating. One of the first things I would suggest is asking for a referral to a board certified veterinary behaviorist to determine if there is an underlying psychological issue that needs to be addressed.

Meanwhile, I would muzzle train her. You will need a muzzle that you can put what's called a stool guard on, so that she can't eat anything off the ground. The Muzzle Up Project has resources on how to go about training her to be comfortable wearing a muzzle. https://muzzleupproject.com/

I've not purchased anything from the following companies, but from a quick Google search, they all have muzzles and stool guards.

Another thing you can do is make sure that she doesn't have access to it. Even if you have a fenced yard, take her out on a leash, and as soon as she poops, move her away from it, then immediately go back and pick it up
 

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Unfortunately, this is a common behavior. How old is the dog? Puppies seem to be more prone to this behavior. This behavior is learned from the mother of the litter. The mother will consume the puppies waste to clean the whelp area and to eliminate the scent from predators.

How often are you walking the dog?
What training has been used during feeding time?
How often do you feed the dog?
What are you feeding?
This may also indicate a lack of a nutrient in the food.
What is the breed?

You can train against resource guarding, but you must be assertive.

When you see the dog eliminating, that is the time to "step" in. Literally, step between the dog and the snack. Stay standing, do not try to pick up. Don't say anything, just block the access. Eventually, the dog should relent and back away. Take a step towards the dog. When the dog steps back again. Then you can attempt a pick up. Stay on each event until the dog relaxes. Don't forget to reward the dog with a treat, pet or play. In effect, you are claiming the treasure as yours. You are taking the lead dog role. Right now, your dog is controlling you.

You can use this "Blocking/Claiming" technique on anything. Please take note, I did not say to strike or punish the dog. You are only to block access.
Yes, your dog's behavior is a bit on the extreme.
 

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Another thought... you don't mention what her body condition is, but if she's losing weight, or extremely hard to keep weight on, then testing for Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency might be a good idea. Dogs with EPI are frequently compulsive stool eaters.
 

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A little more on the "Blocking/Claiming" technique.

I use this blocking very often on our walks. We encounter many street and unleashed dogs. I will step in between my dog and the other dog to simply block. I don't say a word or make a sound. Often the other dog will attempt to side step and go around, I move to maintain the block. The other dog's focus is typically glued to my dog, eventually the dog will look at me, that is when I step forward. The dog will most often retreat a step or so. Then I give the command "Shadow, Come" to continue our walk. If the other dog continues, then I repeat the block. After a few minutes the other dog will give up and leave. Street dogs are the most persistent, but I have always been successful. Unleashed dogs are typically retrieved by the unleashed owner after a few moments.

Leashed dogs receive the same blocking response while I assess the dogs behavior, temperament and grooming, I'm also evaluating the owner. If the dog and owner are both calm, good behavior and temperament, with evidence of grooming.....then I will allow the dogs to meet. The sniff meeting is short, I will allow about 30 seconds or so while watching the dog's behavior.


My point, you can block/claim anything with the right mindset and actions. These 2 examples are me Blocking the other dog and Claiming my dog. This works with dogs I have never met before.

Its odd what our dogs know. Shadow and I have done this dance numerous times. He knows to remain behind me while I block. Somehow he knows when it is ok to meet a leashed dog. He will come from behind me ears forward tail upright and slowly wagging. They sniff. Occasionally, Shadow will tell the other dog to go away. I see this because of the dog's body language and the other dog retreating. It is also evident with the body language about play. We occasionally meet other dogs from the same building, they know each other and will always have short play. You can see this in their body language. A distinct difference between "go away" and "lets play" body language.

Denise, learn this technique. It can be very helpful in many situations.
 

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I've read that feeding the dog some pineapple will make the stool taste bad. I've never tried it and don't know if it will work.
 
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