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Discussion Starter #1
I joined this forum today for one major reason: My dog is going to a shelter unless I can fix him in under 3 days.
He has always been a bit aggressive, as a puppy he would nip people and run away and things like that, but he is about 3 years old now and his fear aggression has turned into full-on attacks. Yesterday, the neighbor's dog came into my yard, and Rudy (my dog) ran through the screen door and chased my neighbor's dog back into their yard. He didnt stop though. He grabbed the poor thing by the stomach and it took 4 people to get his jaws unlocked. Weird thing is, the dog only had 1 puncture wound and only needed 1 staple.
My family always knew that Rudy was a terror, but this is by far the worst he's ever done. He has never gone that far out of his way to attack something like that. My parents decided that this is the very last straw, having already threatened to send him to the pound numerous times, but I've always gotten him out of trouble. (Training lessons, medication, etc.)
Unfortunately, with my resources dried up, I have nowhere else to turn but the internet. He's off to the pound in 3 days and theres no guaruntee that even if he does get better, we'll be able to keep him, but I at least want to make him better so that he gets adopted and doesnt spend the rest of his life in the shelter.
The main points are that he is highly aggressive towards anything unfamiliar. (Strangers, vaccuums, even friends)... He is extremely territorial and wont let anyone near anything that he has (toys, food, socks)...and he only sleeps underneath a bed or someplace that he can barely fit (unusual,I thought I would point it out)
If there is ANYONE out there that knows what to do, please tell me. I love that dog, all I want is to see him happy.

Thanks for taking the time to read all that, I know it's alot.
 

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Sorry, but the desensitization and resocialization required to help your dog is going to take months.
 

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Thing is, this isn't a problem that ANYONE can fix in three days. And frankly, your dog really doesn't sound like a good candidate for being adopted from a shelter. The fact that you're minimizing this problem rather than seeing it as an extremely serious event means that even WITH time, your chances of making a significant impact on this dog's behavior and keeping him safely are VERY low.

I would spend the three days doing everything your dog loves- and have him euthanized at a familiar vet, with the people he loves and trusts around him. This is a better end than alone on a cold shelter table where he doesn't know anyone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
He's going to a no-kill shelter the next county over. And I'm not minimizing the incident, I was pointing out that he weighs about 3 times as much as the neighbor's dog and yet only did a little bit of damage to it. 1 puncture wound is nothing considering it had the opportunity to kill the other dog. It's why I said I thought it was weird.
 

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From the sounds of it your dog is very violent, unfortunatly as everyone mentioned it just can't be fixed in 3 days.... it's also not likely the shelter will be able to adopt him out :(. You seem to think that the damage inflicted on the other dog was pretty minor, considering your dog could have kept going for the kill but that's just awful to think of. It was someone's dog!
I am sorry for you and your pooch though........... it's not an easy situtation to be in.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wasnt thinking of it that way, what Im trying to say is that there must be a reason that he reacted with relative restriction. If he really was a full-out aggresive dog, why didnt he kill the other dog? And yes, Im aware that he is unadoptable in this condition, but if its a no-kill shelter, then there must be some sort of rehabilitation program there or something right?
 

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No, not necessarily. In fact, I would say that most (not all, mind you) no-kill shelters are just that. Shelters where they don't kill the animals. Some may stay there long past the point of adoptability simply because it is the shelter's policy not to kill them.
 

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From the sounds of it you have not trained this dog and let it get away with to much.

correct me if Im wrong. what training have you done? what is his excersise like? what breed?

In 3 days you wont make a dent, resource guarding, dog and human agression and oither training faults will tkae months to fix. just becuase he goes to a no kill shelter means nothing. If the dog is agressive in new situations and to strangers, they will not hesitate to put the dog to sleep. IMOP bext bet is if you are going to get rid of the dog, do it the humane way and PTS. no rescue will adopt out a dog with so many issues.
 

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Even most "no-kill" shelters will put down dogs that are too aggressive to go to new homes. It's a legal liability to adopt them out, besides the safety issue. Unless this shelter is a true sanctuary, they probably will put him down.
 

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Sorry you have to decide what you have to do with your dog :( that is never easy..

Honestly, I would put him down if you can't keep him.. I'm not saying because he is aggressive, I am saying that because no one will adopt a dog with all those issues :( It's sad, but the truth.. at least he wont be left all alone in a shelter will he will never get better.. He will be with his master right up till the end at the vets, and that's the best thing you could do for him.
 

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As unlikely as it is, you could try to get him in at Dog Town or somewhere similar.. I have no idea how you go about getting a dog in at a place like that though.
 

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Even most "no-kill" shelters will put down dogs that are too aggressive to go to new homes. It's a legal liability to adopt them out, besides the safety issue. Unless this shelter is a true sanctuary, they probably will put him down.
I'm very sorry you're dealing with this, but I agree with Willowy....this is not an adoptable dog, and this is not a problem that can be passed on to someone else. Most if not all no-kill shelters will still put down aggressive dogs or sick dogs...or even transfer them to a shelter that does euthanize. Even if they don't, it's likely that he will live out years and years of his life in a kennel at the shelter. I've never heard of a shelter or rescue group that has a rehabilitation program for aggression....it just isn't something people want to deal with due to liability and lack of resources. I'll even go a step further and say that I think it is unfair to the hundreds of dogs out there without issues waiting to be adopted, for a slot to be filled by a dog with aggression issues.

Honestly your options are spending alot of time working with your dog with the help of a professional and keeping him securely contained in the meantime, which is what I would suggest first before even beginning to entertain the thought of taking him to the pound or having him put to sleep, but if that isn't an option, then having him humanely euthanized yourself is the only other thing to do imo.
 

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It sounds like this dog was lacking in the Socialization and Training Departments from early on.

What you're seeing now is the result of, probably, a less-than-ideal puppyhood. You said he used to get nippy as a pup. Was he shown the correct way to behave? How was it addressed? Did he have any training - Puppy Classes, Beginner Obedience, etc? Was he introduced to dozens of other dogs and people? I know there's nothing you can do about those things now, but deficiencies in these areas can be very very telling.

As others have said, three days is not going to cut it. No way, no how - not with fear issues.

You probably need a behaviorist to 'fix' this dog. It seems like his aggression is broad-spectrum: dogs, objects, people. These are time-consuming issues to fix, and since it's more than one, I cannot lie, you have your work cut out for you.

The best thing I can suggest for now is to get him a vet check. Ensure that there are no imbalances in his system that could cause aggressive responses (thyroid issues come to mind). If at all possible, find a behaviorist - not just a trainer, but someone highly qualified, who has dealt with fear and aggression issues beore. It can't all be done in three days, but perhaps if you get the ball rolling, you can buy yourself some (much needed) time.

Good luck.
 

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first let me say I am sorry this is happening.

Moving on from that I agree with the other posters. Three days is not going to fix the problems. Your dog, for whatever reason, is terrified. To that end he attacks things. It is what dogs do when they are really afraid. He is also a resource guarding dog from your description. This means you cannot take things from him and he gets aggressive if you try to.

While all these things are typically preventable when dealt with as they come up and as the puppy grows into a dog, you have an adult dog where these behaviors are now ingrained. Over coming the fear and the resource guarding would take months at best and more like the remainder of the dog's life with anyone who handles or owns the dog having to be constantly vigilant.

Adopting your dog out to anyone would be irresponsible to the adoptee and also irresponsible to the dog.

As hard as this is to say, without the time and money to work on this and a plan to work on it for the rest of the dog's life, the kindest thing you ccan do is have him Put to Sleep. To ease that process some vets will give you medicine before hand that you can give the dog before you take him in so he is pretty groggy and the process is less frightening.

Again, I extend my apologies for not having a solution to your problem that does not take a lot of time, effort and vigilance for the rest of this dog's life. I am also sorry because most of these things could have been prevented when they first began to show up in most dogs.
 

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How are so many dogs today having access to doors that don't stay properly closed?

This just happened to my boyfriend's dog, while he and I were both walking our dogs, only it was two dogs, who were known to be aggressive. They burst out the front door, which wasn't properly secured, for them knowing their dogs were already capable of this, and they both ran off their property attacked my boyfriend's dog.

They were reported to animal control, and if it happens again, I will call 911 right there and they will have their dogs seized. I'm not playing around anymore.

I'll agree with others here who say that training your dog out of this takes a lot longer than 3 days. If you manage to keep your dog, teach it the boundaries of your house, and secure ALL exits to your house so that your dog cannot escape and harm other peoples' pets.
 

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I'm sorry, but 3 days won't even make a dent in your dogs issues. It takes months to retrain a dog away from habits, and to retrain the humans to lead it.

Sometimes the best thing we can do for the ones we love is to make the hardest decision possible. I had a Boxer mix that I loved dearly, and everyone that knew me on this site back then can contest to it. I worked for 8 months on his issue with various trainer and behaviorist. In the end, I knew that it was the best to put him to sleep. Hardest thing I have ever done in my life, but I do not regret it. See, if I would have personally found a home for him if he would have redirected his aggression onto someone from his new family, I could have been sued. For me to take him to a shelter, even a no-kill one that actually does their job, He would have been put down.(I had gotten this dog from a no-kill shelter that do not temperament test their dogs. Therefore I ended up with a dog that was dangerous and could have hurt someone with out me

I vote for you to take him and have him put down in your arms. He'll never have a good life and that is what you need to think about. Unless you can take the months to years to work on his aggression, don't pass off the work on someone else, put him down so he'll never be in fear or pain again.
 

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sadly, no kill just means they dont kill adoptable dogs.

unforunately, a shelter will likely deem your dog unadoptable.

I wish I had advice for you. but the previous posters put it well.
 

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I wasnt thinking of it that way, what Im trying to say is that there must be a reason that he reacted with relative restriction. If he really was a full-out aggresive dog, why didnt he kill the other dog? And yes, Im aware that he is unadoptable in this condition, but if its a no-kill shelter, then there must be some sort of rehabilitation program there or something right?
I don't know about all no-kill shelters but some will euthanize an animal if it is too aggressive. At the clinic where I work, we had to euthanize a dog as it had been adopted out twice from a no-kill shelter and bit the new adopters. He had to stay at the clinic for ten days and then he bit one of my co-workers so he had to stay for another ten days before we could euthanize him. He was aggressive to some people and sweet to others - he was fine with me.

I'm not sure if shelters carry out rehab programs but I would think that they wouldn't be able to keep an aggressive dog.

Why did you wait until now to ask for help? You can contact behaviourists but anything short of sedation will take more than 3 days....
 
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