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Hello. I have a black lab/wire-haired pointer that is a few days away from being a year old. He is friendly, incredibly cute, and very affectionate. The only problem is, he cannot be alone. He hates being kenneled, and he reacts very poorly to it. We gave up on the kennels, because on numerous occasions, he breaks out. When he is in a kennel, it takes him only a few seconds to start drooling and whining. On top of that, he starting destroying anything he can find. I understand that he exhibits multiple symptoms of separation anxiety, and we have tried multiple things to get him over it. We tried the Thunder Shirt, which he tore apart. The kennel doesn't work, because he always seems to find a way to break it down. We're looking for some way to keep him calm, so that he can be happier when we're gone, and so that the house stays intact. Any advice is really appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I dealt with the same things that you are dealing with for a year until I finally decided to seek out help from a veterinary behaviorist. It was the best thing I could have done. He's now on Prozac and his anxiety is under control. Here's a list of veterinary behaviorists http://www.dacvb.org/about/member-directory/
It's not a complete list so if you don't see anyone close to you then call your regular vet and they should be able to refer you, that's how I found ours.
 

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With my two, crating made the SA worse. Are you able to try dog proofing an area and leaving him there? Other things you can try: leave radio or tv on, calming treats, melatonin, leave kong filled with goodies.

Start de-sensitizing him to you coming and going. Start by getting ready to leave. Do all the things you normally do before leaving (get keys, put on shoes, etc) but don't actually leave. Keep doing this until he doesn't seem anxious. Gradually work up to being able to step out, but come right back. The key is to always ensure that he isn't anxious before increasing the departure. Then gradually work up to being able to leave for a few minutes, etc.

It is hard work and you may need drugs if he is very severe.

My two were mild and now usually fine.
 
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