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Discussion Starter #1
At what age or thereabouts are dogs considered seniors?

My girl seems to be slowing down and having a lot of potty accidents indoors.

She came to me as a rescue from the street and her age three and a half years ago when I took her in, was estimated at two or three. So, she could be anywhere between five and six and a half years old, am I right? I've never been good at Math.

She's a lovely girl to me but in all honesty, just a little mutt from an oops litter whose owner just decided to dump her when she was no longer convenient to own.

It could be a UTI and I do need to get her in to be seen by the vet. Also, her teeth are not looking good, although I brush them regularly but the last time I did yesterday, they bled. Not good.

I will be calling the vet tomorrow to schedule an appointment to have her checked out, look into a dental cleaning and what is involved with the anesthesia and how safe it is.

I still think she's rather young for such health issues. Maybe just badly bred? I've certainly done my best to do what's right for her - food, care, exercise, love ...

What's not working?
 

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When a dog is considered a senior depends on their size and breed as different dogs have very different life expectancy. Some larger breeds have an average age as low as 7 or 8 years and are considered seniors as young as 5 or 6. Smaller breeds tend to live longer and aren't considered seniors until they are in their teenage years.

Knowing nothing about her breed or previous history if she is really only 5 or 6 I'd think that is still really young for incontinence issues. I would take her to the vet asap. The gums are a good indicator of health and if you are regularly brushing her teeth it worries me that they are bleeding all of a sudden. She may have UTI but it sounds like there may be some other underlying health problems as well here if she is also having fatigue and poor gum health. How does her breath smell? Does she still have a good appetite? What is she eating?
 

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Definitely go to the vet.

Estimating age is not an exact science. It's possible she is older than you were told. But, my friend's 15 year old cat started rapidly declining 2 weeks ago, not eating, not moving. Heartbroken, she took him to the vet. Turns out, fleas were eating him alive. One flea treatment later, he's his regular self.
 

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Vet definitely.

Some dogs start slowing down younger than others. Summer is 8 and a few months and so far is active and eager. She's also a small dog though. My sheltie, Nikki, by 8 had already started slowing down visibly. Had a lot of arthritis and a white face but she lived to be 12. My other sheltie, Trey didn't slow down till about a year before his death at 13. I always wonder why Nikki slowed down so much faster than the others. I still don't really know, she and Trey were kept on the same food and all that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Vet for sure.

Gally, her breath smells fine. She eats a high quality kibble, mixed in with home-cooked meat and veg. Her appetite is still generally good, although she has the occasional off-day when her food holds no interest but that doesn't happen so often.

She is a small breed, supposedly a mix of Pap and Peke. And yes, she could be older than what the vet originally guesstimated.

I will absolutely have her checked out ASAP and thanks all, for the feedback.
 

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Like the others said, make a vet appointment. Update us after you go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Marie. We have an appointment scheduled for this coming Saturday. A possible UTI test, if the vet thinks that's the problem and what we need to have done.

I'll have her take a look at Plume's teeth/gums too. We've already talked about a dental cleaning, anesthesia and pricing. The price is a bit of a financial ouch but you do what you have to do. I'm a little bit nervous about putting her under anesthesia in fear of things going wrong with that. But I am trying to keep things in perspective. I'd rather take that small risk than the greater risk of her dying from an untreated mouth/tooth/gum disease.

In better news, she gobbled her delicious dinner tonight with enthusiasm. I brushed her teeth afterward and saw less bleeding from the left side. A bit more, but not too much, from the right side. Maybe I just need to be more vigilant about brushing, as in, on a daily basis.

I will schedule the dental cleaning for when I'm on vacation later this month and can look after her while at home.

And I will update on what the vet has to say after our appointment this Saturday.
 

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Glad you have an appointment! I currently don't have a senior but they're near & dear to my heart and my preferred dogs to adopt.
 
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