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Discussion Starter #1
My husband and I are looking to get a dog and are hoping we can get some advice on what kind of dog we should look into...
We live in NYC in a large apt (3K square feet) located near the park for walks. We both work full time (working remotely now) but would invest in doggy daycare and/or dog walkers and are very active when we are not working. Besides family dogs growing up, this would be our first dog. We don’t have kids but likely will in a few years.
In an ideal world (realize this is not all possible) we are looking for a dog that is:
  • Lovable and cuddly, kind
  • medium to large size
  • Low shedding (my husband prefers dogs that don’t have curly hair though...)
  • very little to no barking
 

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An off the track Greyhound would be a good option. Though reserved, they can be quite affectionate with with owners, are definitely large, have a tight coat with little to no undercoat, and aren't usually barkers. They also don't need nearly as much exercise as people think once they quit racing.
 

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A greyhound does seem to fit the bill pretty well. You'd probably need to be willing to adopt sight unseen if you went with an off the track greyhound, Florida had shut down its tracks for good as of yesterday and as it was the biggest racing state, I expect most would come from there.

But people breed greyhounds for non-track purposes too so a puppy is an option and I think the large, quiet, and friendly is covered. Not sure on shedding since short and thin coats still leave hair around, its just easy to vaccuum basically.

What size would you describe as medium to large? like, in my head, my 65 lb pit bull is "medium" cause she is stocky and not super tall or long. But some people think weight vs dimensions.
 

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Second the Greyhound,

Afghans came to mind too.. Irish wolf hound maybe?..
 

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I'm not sure if you own or rent your apartment, but do you have any restrictions on breed, size, or type from a landlord or housing association? Your own insurance? And can I ask what your husband doesn't like about curly coats, because if it's the maintenance that can rule out some other breeds as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all. To clarify the size I think of medium to large as being like 30-75lbs. Not really any larger than a large golden retriever. I personally love the look of a bernedoodle but a) may have health problems and b) has the curly hair that my husband doesn’t love (just a preference on looks)
 

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Greys are right in that size range. They tend to look bigger because they are tall and lean.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmm yeah I don’t love the look of greys...they’re not very fluffy / cuddly looking haha. Any other ideas?
 

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Fluffy, low shedding but not curly coated are kinda like "pick two of the three"

Wire coated dogs are low shedding (grooming required) but not fluffy.

Double coated dogs are fluffy but not low shedding.

If you can deal with the shedding, a classic choice for a reason is a Lab/Lab mix of 2-3 years old from a shelter or rescue.

If you like the look of the Bernadoodle, maybe an actual Berner? Gonna shed though but unlike most doodle mixes, you can seek out a reputable breeder to lesson some of the health issues risk.

Its not the easiest time to do so given Covid, but really, I think the best thing would be just meeting dogs at the shelter and through rescue groups because especially the barking or lack thereof can be very individual beyond just breed traits.
 

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Unfortunately, you're not going to find a lot of fluffy dogs that don't shed much. Low shedding large dogs are mostly either very, very thin-coated like a grey, wiry - which looks shaggier, but isn't always nice to cuddle with - like a giant schnauzer (probably not a great dog for you anyway, just the first wiry large breed I thought of), or curly to some degree. Don't fall for the hype of people who breed poodle crosses and claim that the dogs who don't inherit the curly poodle coats are low-shedding and hypoallergenic - sadly it just doesn't work that way.
 

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Olde english sheepdogs are low shedding and "fluffy".

A bearded collie, maybe.

Soft-coated Wheaten Terriers are shaggy when grown out, and not fluffy, but very soft (hence the name)
 

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Fact of life: Dogs shed. :) Some more than others. Most of the lower-shedding breeds, like Poodles, Wheatens, Kerry Blues, hard-coated terriers, etc., have pretty intense grooming requirements to keep their coat in shape.

If you want a doodle-type dog, then check out the Bearded Retriever Club of America. home The dogs were originally a Golden Retriever x Poodle crosses, but they are trying to set breed type, and have the dogs breed true through multiple generations. As a warning though, pretty much every cross that has Poodle in it requires a ton of grooming.
 

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You can go to AKC.org then their breed page and put in search criteria. For instance, for me I'm looking for a small to medium dog in the 25-40 pound range. My biases are I don't want anything with a coat longer than the big dogs I've had (Akitas and Rottweilers), don't want curly or wiry, don't want yappy. Can't stand a roached back and don't much like white. Do want a dog with the get up and go and temperament to work with in Rally, Obedience and other dog sports. Believe me, ideas like that narrow things down very quickly and compromise may be called for.

Good luck to us.
 

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Olde english sheepdogs are low shedding and "fluffy".

A bearded collie, maybe.

Soft-coated Wheaten Terriers are shaggy when grown out, and not fluffy, but very soft (hence the name)
Good point. I've been avoiding suggesting terriers because a lot are great with family, but not especially friendly and sociable with strangers. Not sure if you're looking for a dog who loves everyone or are okay if it's only cuddly and friendly to family, @Tatertotwoof.

I haven't been around OES since I was a kid. The one I spent the most time with (which still wasn't much - family friend who wasn't local) was lovely, but another who lived across the street wound up biting someone. I'm guessing that's NOT a desirable temperament in the breed, but I don't know whether aggression or anxiousness is a problem with the breed or if Max was a major outlier. Can't speak to how barky they are - some herding breeds are, some less so. I didn't know bearded collies were low-shedding though, thought they had a double coat, if a longer one than usual.
 

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IMO, unless its a livestock dog or a "protection" type dog, they should be OK with children and people if socilized correctly.

Terriers may not be outgoing, but mostly ok being around new people. Wouldn't expect it to be golden retriever happy about meeting people, but probably wouldn't mind a stranger petting it.

I know of a handful of herding breeds who do well with children, if they have a good outlit. Dog wont nip at children if its properly mentally stimulated. Etc..

and I guess the OP should elaberate on "child friendly" lots of people think their dog should be fine with being poked and pulled on, but thats not fair. Children should respect dogs and should be taught not to invade a dogs space.
 

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Oh, yeah, I didn't mean that they'd be aggressive towards strangers, just that a lot of terriers I've known are very reserved, uninterested, or even suspicious of strangers, and I had been assuming that "lovable and cuddly, kind" description by Tatertotwoof was more like, as you said, a golden temperament who was that way with everyone. That's why I asked for elaboration on whether they want a dog who's everyone's best friend and loves all the people ever, or is fine with a dog who's more aloof with people outside of its known circle. I also don't know any soft-coated wheatons so I'm going on terriers in general instead of that breed specifically, they might be more laid back about new people than others, I'm not sure!
 

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I am blanking right now on the name of a poster who hasnt been by for a awhile with 2 Wheatens

But if I recall correctly, the one from a good breeder was quite friendly to people outside the family and that was typical for the breed

I had thought of wheatens but wasn't sure if the coat was curly or not from the point of view of the OP's husband. I think some lines are more curly and some more shaggy

Never met one either so couldn't speak from experience
 

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A family member had some Wheaten's and they where always very happy to see people, and get some pets.

but that's just two Wheaten's I've met, so Idk about the general population.

to remind you, they don't really have curly coats, mostly wavy, but they look curlier when shaved

Grown out

File:Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier 600.jpg - Wikimedia Commons


Shaved


still more wavy than curly, but worth asking if wavy is okay
 

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Wheatens do need to be groomed. Just letting you know.

A first dog should be about the right temperament first and foremost with looks being secondary.
 
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