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My husband and I lost our lovely wheaten terrier last year at age 15 years. We miss her very much and we are ready to get a new dog but it would need to be ‘hypoallergenic’ and not too Barky like our wheaten was ( yes, she was perfect) and from a reputable source. We live in CT. Any suggestions? It seems that a Cavachon might be a good option. I would really welcome suggestions because the dogs health, availability and cost are all factors and we are feeling lost at this point. Thanks!
 

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What breeds work as 'hypoallergenic' is highly variable from person to person. There's no true hypoallergenic dog breed, but dogs with hair - curly or wiry - don't shed as much and therefore often keep dander and other allergens they might collect on their coat (dust, pollen) more contained rather than floating around the house or sticking to furniture. Probably helps that curly breeds are bathed more often on average, too, since they need regular grooming.

What I'm saying is that, if you want to be very sure the dog works for your household's allergy concerns, go with a breed that you absolutely know the allergic person/people respond well to (like another Wheaton), or go meet adults of the breeds you're considering and spend time with them to better judge how they work for you. I've known people who could live fine with wire-haired dogs but had trouble with poodles, who are the quintessential 'hypoallergenic' breed you hear recommended.

Be very, very careful with crossbreeds like Cavachons. Because they haven't been carefully bred for a consistent coat type over many generations, they can often vary quite a bit when it comes to how much they shed and how easy it is to manage their coat - and, of course - how an allergic person may respond to any given individual, even within the same litter. By this same token, the unfortunate truth is that it's much harder to find someone breeding mixed breed dogs responsibly - that is, doing thorough health testing and temperament evaluations to produce puppies that are as healthy and stable as possible - than a responsible purebred breeder.

Health testing is especially important in this case because Cavalier King Charles Spaniels - the 'Cava' part of a Cavachon - are lovely, lovely dogs but have devastating health problems. It's no joke. Over half of the entire population of the breed has the terminal heart condition called Mitral Valve Disease by only five years old. Almost all of them have it by ten. And that's not the only serious health condition in the breed by a long shot. This is not something that vanishes just by breeding a Cavalier to a different breed, and I would personally be extremely picky about how a breeder was managing health issues in their lines if I was getting a dog with any Cavalier in it. Breaks my heart, because they're such delightful dogs.
 

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Couldn't have said it better myself.

the problem is because hypoallergenic is the latest hype too many unscrupulous breeders are mixing dogs without any testing marketing them as hypoallergenic and charging huge amounts of money.
Sadly for many people they find out too late that the hypoallergenic dog they think they have bought is nothing of the sort.
 

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Thanks very much for your comments - sounds like I am better off sticking with a purebred dog. I’ve done research on the CKCharles and I know about their serious health issues - very sad because they are so very sweet. I don’t want to risk getting a Cavachon with health issues. I’d consider getting another wheaten but as an older person I don’t want to have to deal with the strong prey drive - is a bishon a good option or a havanese? Is there Another ‘hypoallergenic’ breed that isn’t too barky?
 

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Bichon Frise and Poodles have similar coats. A lot of people who have dog allergies find that they don't have a reaction, or at least not as severe, to them. The downside of course, is the grooming they both require. Although if you've had a Wheaten, you've done a fair bit of grooming.
 

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My family has a history of allergies. I myself have a very mild allergy to dogs. My wife and daughter have a more severe sensitivity.

What we've found is that both tend to do well with dogs they've lived with for a while. We had three dogs sleeping in our bedroom for years. Two were big-time shedders and the third actually slept on the bed. My wife did fine with them. But when we'd dog-sit for one or more of my son's dogs, she'd have a reaction. At least once, I ended up taking her to the ER with a severe asthma attack. None of these dogs were alleged to be "hypoallergenic," though I suppose the miniature schnauzer would be labelled as such by some.

This is just a personal observation and I don't know if there's any scientific validity to it. My daughter is starting to adjust to a new, second dog (likely AmStaff and big-time shedder) and is finding the same thing.
 

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Poodle! If you get a Show line they are more likely to be less drivey, and they come in three sizes (4 if you count moyen).. Toy, Mini, and Standard. One of them is bound to suit you, just shave them down so they will be low maitence and wala! best doggo ever <3
 

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I wanted to say mini schnauzer, but unless you train them, they are barky by nature and pretty prey driven. But me being bias, I love mini schnauzers! One thing to keep in mind, they are very intelligent, want to please you, so can be very easily trained.

They are so personable and love to be talked to, they have been the best emotional support for me and best company I could ever ask for.

Bear in mind there is no hypoallergenic animal with hair or fur. Only low allergen. I have slight reactions when I rub my face in his fur or comb him, but it's not that bad.

Also I'd like to mention like Ron, I have more reaction to a dog that doesn't live with me, for example I had more reaction (sneezing, runny nose, itchy face and skin) when I was doggysitting a shihtzu without even combing or rubbing my face. Another thing I noticed: More reaction to my new pup than my Mini of almost 15 years. I assume I'll build a bit of a tolerance to his particular coat as we go on. I'll stess either way, the little reactions I have are 100% worth the companionship.
 
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