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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a 3 year old toy chihuahua and am only on day 5. I know he could probably be traumatized from his life changes but we treat him really good and when we focus attention on him he gets really happy, if things don't totally go his way he looks like he's crying, shaking, tail between legs. Were not yelling at him strictly and he's happy most of the time but if I leave and even though the rest of my family is home (who he likes) he looks really depressed. Am I making him too dependent on me? When I'm home I like to spend all my time with him and there isn't much time he isn't not petted or cuddled with by me and that's even when we sleep. Maybe I'm letting him make too much of a production of me coming home or leaving. Or maybe his last owner did bad things to him. I'm not sure what to do
 

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you might want to have her checked for hypoglycemia, and other ailments common to "teacup" dogs
 

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I would just relax. Dogs go through so many adjustments in the first weeks. I wouldn't be reading too much into anything. It takes 2 or 3 months for a dog to settle in.

When you're home, I would balance giving direct attention and just hanging out. Just because a dog is sitting near you doesn't mean you have to be petting it. Just try to relax.

I would also fight the urge to try to figure out what the last owner may or may not have done to him. It really doesn't help/matter. I adopted one and lived with her for months before finding out her story. Her story was hideous, but it didn't change who she was or what she needed. She just needed to be safe and have a great life. She didn't need me feeling bad for her or trying to baby her for things she had forgotten all about and moved past.

RELAX! Have fun. Enjoy these early days and let your relationship quietly unfold. It's gonna be great.
 

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It's been 5 days. It takes at least 6 weeks for a dog to calm down and settle in. At this point, you can't really make a determination about behaviorial problems.

Definitely don't make a production out of leaving if it upsets your dog. Just go. Don't give a long goodbye, don't say goodbye, just leave. You can even practice doing things you do before you go, but not going so the dog doesn't associate you putting on shoes with you leaving and freak out every time you put on shoes.

Otherwise, just be gentle and patient and let him settle in.
 

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I'm sorry, I meant toy not teacup. Same thing though?
Teacup is not a real size. Basically, it's the result of BYBs breeding smaller and smaller dogs until they have something tinier than it should be. Amazingly, people actually pay more for a dog labeled as "teacup".
 

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Did you get a check up with a vet? Anytime you get a new dog, a check with the vet is a good idea, just to get off to a good start.

It's really important to build a bond with your dog, but you don't want it to be unhealthy, so that he can never be happy unless you're there. Yes, you can give her a lot of love throughout the day. But, make sure she can be independent as well.

One way to help with independence is to give him a treat that lasts a long time, like a bully stick or a frozen, stuffed kong, so that it can keep him occupied on the treat instead of on following you, or being upset when you're gone.
Another thing is to NOT make a big deal when you leave or come home. Don't make a fuss.
You can also make lots of boring trips around the house while you're home to discourage him from always following you. For instance, if you are sitting down in the living room, get up and go get a drink, then come back. Thirty seconds later, go get a book. Thirty seconds later, go put your drink away. Thirty seconds later go get a sweater. You get the point. Just make lots of boring, random trips. The goal is for the dog to see nothing exciting is going on and it's a hassle to keep following you.

Training the dog to perform commands can help build a bond, as can walking.
 

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I'm sorry, I meant toy not teacup. Same thing though?
nah. Obviously I can't rule out a physical ailment, but it's not the same.


Teacup is not a real size. Basically, it's the result of BYBs breeding smaller and smaller dogs until they have something tinier than it should be. Amazingly, people actually pay more for a dog labeled as "teacup".
It can be even worse that that. A dog has a window of what, 2-3 weeks during which she can concieve. If bred early and then again late in the cycle, a breeder "specializing" in teacup dogs can improve the odds of getting tiny little premature pups -- when the first batch is ready to deliver, they all come out at the same time.
 
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