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Discussion Starter #1
For those of you that have Corgis, can you tell me what you love about them and what you don't love about them?

After researching a bit more, I'm thinking about the Cardigan Corgis pretty heavily in terms of my next dog. I love Samoyeds, but Corgis look like they are a little easier upkeep wise, but could still keep up with an active lifestyle.

Plus, they're REALLY REALLY CUTE!!!!!

The Cardis are the ones with the tails, and tend to be a bit heavier boned then the Pems.

Anyone have experience? Anyone know a good breeder I could bug for information?
 

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What state are you in, and I'll point you to some good folks.

Cardis are wonderful dogs. They're NOT a pushbutton dog, and can be kind of a challange in performance work because they like to create NEW versions of exercises if you repeat the old one too often (especially if you repeat the old one without reinforcement :p) They range from VERY drivey to couch potatoes- even in the same litter- but the vast majority of them fall somewhere in the middle, and even the couchpotatoes CAN keep up with an active lifestyle with no issue as long as the food's good ;P.

If you like the Samoyed personality, you may actually like the spitzier Pem better- and you might want to look at Vallhunds too, if the tail's the issue. Cardis are not as outgoing- some are real social butterflies, but some can't be bothered with anyone outside the family.

Health problems are pretty minimal. At this point, I wouldn't buy from a breeder who didn't check hips (but I'd be okay with getting a copy of the x-rays for MY vet to look at- a lot of folks don't OFA). PRA is the big issue that everyone worries about- there's a DNA test, it's a simple recessive, and I don't know of anyone breeding carriers who isn't extremely careful. As far as who to talk to... I'd talk to Kim Shira, Lisa Phillips, Betty Ann Seely, and while she's not got anything planned according to her webpage, Cathy Ochs-Cline, she'd be an invaluable resource - she produces LOVELY dogs with gorgeous toplines and temperament to die for. (We've got great temperments in the breed right now, but I'm seeing a LOT of weird toplines cropping up.)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hello Animal! Yes, I'll be showing and doing agility. I don't know much about agility, but we have a great group here called the Wild Weavers, and I can get in contact with them.

Dogstar- I live in Central Ohio, so send away! I like dogs that are a challenge. I love northern/spitz breeds, and would prefer a dog to have that streak of independence.

I think they COULD be a very good fit for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Dogstar, what is a houndy temperment? I don't mind a drivey, stubborn dog. Maybe its the independence? I've heard that the Cardis are similar to GSDs, and I like their temperment very well, too. I guess what I meant is that I like dogs that can "think" for themselves, even if it means more work for me as a trainer.
 

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Woohoo, another corgi fan!!!
I am partial to the pembrokes, though cardigans are nice dogs also and I wouldn't mind having one at some point.
I had a tri color male pembroke, Roscoe, who was as loyal a dog as you can find. He was given to us as a puppy from a lady my mom worked with. We lost him in a freak accident, but my aunt still has his sister, Gertie. A friend of my mom's also has a little female pembroke, named Tasha.
My Bailey is the love of my life. She loves people, and I am looking into getting her certified to be a therapy dog. Her favorite thing is car rides, we take her on vacation with us to Georgia every year where my cousin's family owns a cabin on a very private lake. Bailey swims and wades in the water on occasion there, which is very unusual for a corgi.
They are very much herders, which is very unfortunate for the dachshund who she herds through the house:rolleyes:
Female corgis tend to be dominant, which is something to consider if you have another dog.
Shedding is really the only downside to the corgis. They shed A LOT. However, with regular grooming and a good diet it is very manageable.
I live in Ohio also, there are some great pembroke corgi rescues around here and a cardigan rescue over in Indiana. I can get their urls to you if you are interested. I got Bailey from a breeder in Georgetown, Ohio, who shows them. I do not show Bailey, but am looking into agility.
Pembroke corgis are very loyal, loving dogs who want to please their owners. They are very smart(it took Bailey all of 5 minutes to learn shake) and affectionate.
Good luck finding the right dog! Let mw know if I can help in any way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi, thanks for replying!

I'll be looking for a dog to compete with in the ring, as well as agility, so I don't think a rescue will fit the bill. I do appreciate people who push rescue, though! Good for you!

Yeah, I think both "breeds" are beautiful and interesting dogs.
 

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The Pems are more 'up' and pushy. Cardigans are more likely to say "THis isn't fun, I'm DONE." By houndy, I mean that they're more aware of their environment (which they do have in common with shepherds) and that they can be frustrating for that reason - keeping track of what's going on can be MUCH more important than anything you can offer as a reinforcer.
 

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I prefer the Pembrokes myself, both appearance-wise and personality-wise. I like how they are a bit smaller and more compact, and I'm just crazy about those fuzzy butts! Come to find out, there are a few breeders of Pems who don't dock the tails at birth. I may sniff one out later on for one of my next dogs and try out a tailed Pembroke.

Shippo is like the class clown and has to meet EVERYONE. He is a social butterfly and gets a lot of attention for it lol. He's always wanting to learn something new, and is incredibly easy to train because of that. Being a corgi, sometimes he gets carried away during play with other dogs (particularly during games of chase) and sometimes gets in trouble with the other dog for losing his brain and biting the other dog on the butt in the heat of the moment lol.

I fully plan on doing agility, flyball, and therapy with him when I get the money, as I think he'd be great at all of it. Maybe Novice Obedience as well.

I'm hooked on corgis and can't imagine life without one!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the input, everyone!

I like that "push!" I can't deny that. I do like that spitzy temperment that seems to be more of the Pembroke then the Cardis. I know it's silly, but I love dogs who are always "smiling."

Thanks for the info!!

I'm not QUITE saying that I'm going back to the drawing board, but you've definitely given me some things to think about. My next dog will be a spitz of some kind for sure.

One think I really liked about the Sammies is that like Corgis, they're kind of all purpose dogs. They can do agility, obedience, and have a good deal of fuzzy coat that I can snuggle up to in the cold winter months here (which is most of the time, it seems). Plus, the Corgis are compact enough that they are easy to travel with. Sams can definitely grow a bit larger, and have a ton more coat.

I've looked into keeshonds too, but I'm not entirely sure I'm sold on their personality. Akitas are too much dog for me, as are huskies and malamutes. It's good to know you're limits!!

Not that Sams are "easy" dogs, as in they do needs LOTS Of exercise and mental stimulation, but they're a bit less drivey and hyper then a husky. OR SO I've been told. ;-)

Although, I do hear that they are supreme escape artists...hmmm...
 

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I am gonna semi-hijack this thread because a Corgi is seriously in my future somewhere -- probably a Pem, since Cardis aren't too common here. When you draw the distinction between the Pem's spitzy personality and the Cardi's houndy one, what exactly do you mean? I have experience training Beagles, but I'm looking for something slightly more biddable than this. To be specific, I'd appreciate some more creativity, as well as a little less of that "what's in it for me?" gene. I haven't had much experience with spitzes of any kind, so what does the spitz personality entail?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
From my experience, we had keeshonds growing up and I used to show them in 4 h and such, they are very intelligent and playful dogs.

However, most spitzes are pretty similar in personality.

They often think for themselves, and figure out "problems" such as, "How do I get out of this fenced in yard?" "If I pull on this door, can I escape?" :p

They are very interactive and very trainable. You just have to keep it interesting. Spitzes in general catch on to things VERY quickly and most tend to be very handler oriented. They love to learn and they need to have that mental stimulation.

And most are "upbeat" dogs, which means it never rains on their parade.

I think spitzes are less intense then what a german shepherd or malinois would be training wise. Maybe the Cardi is an exception to that?
 

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It can really depend. Indy, when totally *ON* was as drivey as any Mal or GSD *WHEN HE CHOSE TO BE*. The 'choosing to be' was key. :p This is a dog that when working goats (and Indy was on the 'small' end for a male Cardi- about 32.5 pounds at his ideal working weight.) KNOCKED ME OVER by running into a foot I stuck out to slow him down. (He was in the middle of tangling with Cranky Doe Who Didn't Want To Go Back In The Pen and I was afraid for his safety. :p Running full speed into my foot didn't even slow him down, but spun me all the way around and I fell over, and I am NOT a small person. As soon as he got Cranky back in the pen, he was back to see if I was okay (and if any treats had fallen out of my pockets while I was lying on the ground, just checking, Mom). It's not that Pems can't be intense but I've not met any that were as intense as Indy, and Indy drove a lot of the trainers we worked with over the years to distraction, because he COULD be that intense and wouldn't turn it on if he didn't feel like it. He LOVED to tug, but would only work for it a limited amount- you could get decent heads-up heeling in exchange for a high ROR, but he had very definite Ideas about how much heeling was fair exchange for a given period of tug. :p Toys and treats would get him to perform, but he didn't find working in obedience innately reinforcing the way some dogs do- Mal and Kaylee find working as a team WITH me to be innately reinforcing, so does Lizzie. With Mal and Kaylee, I'm not sure how much of that is natural. With Lizzie, a great deal of it is trained, using things that I learned from what DIDN'T work with Indy. He LOVED to critter and was safe with my ratties and mice as long as they weren't loose on the floor, but killed probably several hundred rodents over his lifetime in the barn and in the field. His 'sister' Summer caught a JACKRABBIT in full flight (admittedly, a young and stupid jackrabbit that zigged when he should have zagged :p), something that most sighthounds have trouble with. I never convinced her to break out of a trot on the agility field unless it was for the purpose of zoomies. :p I love that about them- but if you have it in your heart that you want to do lots of different sports? I'd stick with the Pem, as they're easier to bribe, I mean convince that activities they don't find innately reinforcing are fun.
 

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I see. The Pem sounds like what I'm searching for... Thank you for the advice! I'll be watching this thread as well.

By the way, Sammgirl, just to make your decision a little harder:



:D
 

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It seems like Corgis are really getting more popular:D I take Bailey out with me and people get so excited "Oh my gosh, a Corgi!" at least they know what she is now, I used to have people ask me "Is that a German Sheperd Dachshund mix?" haha...
I think the most heart-warming experience I had taking her out was at a PetSmart. A man and his autistic son were shopping and the man asked if they could pet her. He had been looking for a smaller-sized dog for his son and was leaning toward Corgis, though he had never met one. As I told the man about the ups and downs of Corgis Bailey gave the boy many kisses and laid in his lap:p The man was very impressed with how she interacted with his son. I could have cried it was so cute.
Corgis really seem to be very in-tune with their humans. They pick up on emotions and seem to really have an understanding of situations even before you do. They seem to always be one step ahead.
 
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