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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most leashes be using the ever popular swivel-eye snap hook. Other day while my boy bosco was romping & rolling in the cool green grass next to the busiest roadway in my neck of the woods, to my utter horror i noticed that the ever popular swivel-eye snap hook had somehow opened and was totally disconnected from my boy bosco's harness. Without hesitation i bolted into action and re-restrained my boy bosco. Thankfully due to my alertness and brisk reflexes any possible catastrophes had been averted, at least for the time being. Afterwards we rushed home and scoured the interweb for a better way. Found very little in the way of safety clasps for leashes that were up to our standards. As the old saying goes, "if you want something done right, do it yourself". Wells here's what i had laying around the homestead. Obviously we'll be looking to upgrade to some stronger materials as needed. Come monday we'll be contacting our local patents office...

Accident waiting to happen...?



Safety first, our number one priority...
 

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I would get a new leash when the buckle becomes untrustworthy. I know I buy more leashes than average but it's literally a matter of life and death for fido.
 

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A good quality lobster clasp/gate spring clip, which opens similarly to a carabiner, is my favorite for this reason (although you can find cheapo ones of that style too, always inspect a clasp before you use it for sure). Some of the spring hooks are okay, but others seem to wear out or get stiff and 'sticky' easily, where the mechanism doesn't want to work smoothly. I do know of some people who use locking, climbing-rated carabiners for dogs who are very strong or have behavior issues that could create dangerous situations if the equipment fails, but of course those are a huge pain to get on and off. Gotta make some trade-offs in those situations.
 

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My dog is trained very well. We use a leash where we must, but should it come unclipped he would be obedient so it's not a huge concern.

I have used horse leads as well as a piece of rope tied to the collar.

I never use a harness other than an agitation harness for protection training for IGP. Most pet walking harnesses a dog can slip which is more dangerous than the hasp coming off!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My dog is trained very well. We use a leash where we must, but should it come unclipped he would be obedient so it's not a huge concern.
I have used horse leads as well as a piece of rope tied to the collar.
I never use a harness other than an agitation harness for protection training for IGP. Most pet walking harnesses a dog can slip which is more dangerous than the hasp coming off!
My boy bosco is coming along but next to a busy roadway isn't the place i'm wanting to put its training to the test. As for the harness, yes if my boy bosco puts on the brakes and i pull, the harness starts to slip, don't ask me how i know. But as long as the dog keeps moving forward, the harnesss works well, just gotta be aware of its limits...
 

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I’ll stick with my snap leashes, thanks!

This sort of accident can happen with all leashes, albeit claw, carabiner, or others. A good quality leash of all these types of clips won’t have this issue.
I’ve also found that claw clips tend to be used on much lower quality leashes, so I avoid them.

Snaps, imo are just more convenient. No point in switching for an issue all leashes have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ll stick with my snap leashes, thanks!

This sort of accident can happen with all leashes, albeit claw, carabiner, or others. A good quality leash of all these types of clips won’t have this issue.
I’ve also found that claw clips tend to be used on much lower quality leashes, so I avoid them.

Snaps, imo are just more convenient. No point in switching for an issue all leashes have.
Eggactly... i ain't be switching anything, i'm adding an additional piece of safety, that's the beauty of it...
 

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But also get a new leash. You KNOW this one is faulty, and adding those Keychain carabiners won't slow him down if he bolts while the leash is disconnected.


If you must have snap clips, go to a hardware store and find the ropes and chains, they will have "snap links" in there with serious weight ratings and strong springs.
 

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I’ll stick with my snap leashes, thanks!

This sort of accident can happen with all leashes, albeit claw, carabiner, or others. A good quality leash of all these types of clips won’t have this issue.
I’ve also found that claw clips tend to be used on much lower quality leashes, so I avoid them.

Snaps, imo are just more convenient. No point in switching for an issue all leashes have.
How interesting! I own a couple really nice leashes and tracking lines with good, strong lobster claw snaps, and see them pretty often in stores. Maybe it's regional differences? My younger dog wades in the ocean in the summer, and I only use the stainless steel gate clips meant for marine boats or marine sports for his water leashes - fewer parts that can rust or break. I'm less fussy about his other leashes because they're not exposed to as harsh conditions, but seawater can really mess lower quality metal up fast.
 

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I make leashes and always get snaps a bit larger than "normal". I want one that is rated for more weight than I think it would be used for.
But, for my dogs, I mostly use a one piece collar/leash combo (French martingale), that I also make. It's basically a martingale collar with the martingale portion extends into the leash, so no snap to fail. I fit them so if the dog pulls back, it can't slip over head.
 
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