Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I've just started having the time to walk/run with my dogs. Especially Banjo who is maybe not high energy, but easily excitable. She runs out of energy fast when you walk/run with her, but when she hasn't had anything to do all day she is all over the place. My question is, is a run of the same distance, but less time worth the same as a walk that is more time but again, the same distance? And how much should we wear her down? My boyfriend can literally outrun her distance and speed, but when should we call it quits for her?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Our dog is a lot tireder after being allowed to run a lot on a shorter route than if she just walked on a longer route. Our dog is a puppy, so I let her pick the speed and I just stay along next to her. She never seems tired by the end of a run/walk, but she passes out 30-45 minutes later after getting back.

I would pick a speed/distance and see how the dog feels after that and then increase it gradually until the dog is as tired as you want. Though, it'll probably also depend on how much activity the dog had earlier that day, and even the day before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
You have to get your dog into shape, the same way we need to get into shape, before you expect the dog to keep up with you.

The softer the ground is, the better for running with your dog (if you're able, allow them to run on the grass next to the sidewalk, instead of on the sidewalk)

Speedwalking your route for a few weeks before running is a great way to get the dog into shape. Once that is going smoothly (not sore or over-tired when they get home) then incorporate some short running intervals into the mix.

The trouble with dogs is they just want to please. And if the pack is moving that way, the dogs going to move that way too, quite often to their discomfort. So remember to take it slow, and build it up.

If you start slow you will also come to recognize any physical limitations that your dog might have that might not make your dog a good jogging buddy (ie patella problems, cruciate problems, disc problems etc!) Starting slow will help prevent further injury, and allow you to assess when your dog should be in fitness, and make that your goal.

My chihuahua can keep up with both me and my boyfriend, as well as my other dogs just fine on our big long off-leash walks, he can also do agility and he's in great shape. But it took him LONGER to get to the point where he could effortlessly go 5km uphill through Mt. Doug park because he has physical limitations (I would call being 5lbs a physical limitation! LOL)

But once the level of fitness is there, running with your dog is a great way to bond!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm not so concerned with getting my dogs into shape, but more with just which is more effective, running or walking, for burning off excess energy. I don't have the time to develop an entire excercize schedule. I just walk or run them when it's warm enough and I have enough time before dark. Or if Banjo has WAY too much energy and won't let do my homework or something. Sometimes Aurora will help if she sees Banjo is too energetic, and will engage her in rough housing for me and that helps, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
A 20 minute run tires out my dog as much as a two hour walk, so my vote is definitely for the running. But as mentioned, you do need to build up to it if you're going to want to do it daily.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top