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Freddie is Romanian, he was unwanted and kept in an outside kennel with little human interaction for about the first year of his life and then dumped in a public shelter. He was rescued from there and a foster carer looked after and worked with him for around 5 months and then put him up for adoption for his forever home. I have had him 2 weeks. When he first arrived he was terrified, growling, snarling and snapping at people, when I went to collect him I bribed him with chicken and he was good travelling home in the car. It only took 3/4 days to toilet train him - smart dog - he loves a cuddle, pulls a bit on his harness but we are working on that. He's learnt sit, lie down, wait already. Sorry about the long winded post, I just wanted to give background.
My 2 major problems are,
1. he's snapping - putting harness on, taking harness off, drying feet with towel, cleaning bottom, cleaning eyes, I've never experienced this before. I realise it's most likely due to ill treatment and it's fear and mistrust rather than aggression. He's not biting hard, just mouthing really, a warning - get off! - I also realise it's something I need to handle quickly and correctly.
2. He starts crying, whining and kicking up in public if we stop walking and also barks and lunges at other dogs. I've been trying to get his attention and reward 'quiet'
I know it's really early days, but want to get started on the right track as soon as possible.
Advice please?
 

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I'm not sure I can help with your first question, but as the owner of a snarling beast on a leash myself, I can say that a lot of leash reactivity is management. There are lots of threads on that topic because it's quite common. You're not alone!

Basically, in order to train your dog to look at you, or sit, or touch, or anything instead of freak out at the other dog...you have to be at a distance where they aren't already over threshold and freaking out. That might mean crossing the street if you see another dog, turning around, going around a solid barrier like a parked car...anything to prevent the incident from beginning. Then you can start working on getting his attention and giving a treat for whatever behavior you ask for (we like using "touch"). Eventually, a dog in the distance means we're going to work for treats, and that's way more fun than growling!

It's a process, though. Lately my challenging adolescent (7 months) hasn't been listening as well as she was, so we are doing a LOT more management (walking away) than training. We're going to try a training class where all of the dogs are on-leash to keep working on this, and that may be something to help you too! I'm excited because it's a large space and only 6 dogs are enrolled in class at a time.
 

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OP, look up "counter conditioning and desensitization" for the handling concerns. And this will help with the leash behavior too.

Not to derail the thread, but I am curious... Alisa, is Prinna's reactivity fear or frustration based?
 

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Thanks, Alisa, I've been working on 'look at me' so will try and use that as a distraction when we're out and about. I've been thinking of looking for a local training class, I think that would benefit us both.
 

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Not to derail the thread, but I am curious... Alisa, is Prinna's reactivity fear or frustration based?
Good question! I do not think it is fear based...maybe I should post a new thread with a video for interpretations! She has a very bold, rush-up-and-challenge-the-dog habit with most dogs...I can't unlock the key to why, but with some rare dogs she walks up head/tail down, sweet and submissive as can be. Those tend to be safe, known dogs. But with most, she is tail UP and ready to rush into their space, even with some dogs she has known for months at daycare. She is quiet, but does try to lunge even when there is distance between us and the other dog.

Every day I'm thankful that she is so people-friendly. And cute. She was snarling when a neighbor was passing us in the hallway last week with her dog, and she actually complimented Prinna. How my pup managed to earn a compliment while acting like a little demon is beyond me! :laugh:
 

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Don't put too much credit in the head/tail up meaning it's not fear. Mostly it means 'I want more space so I will rush forward and be aggressive/confrontational to get it'. Especially when the dog's ability to retreat is blocked by a leash or fence.

That said, quiet always worries me. Dogs who bluster and make a lot of noise are usually bluffing and issuing a warning - sort of screaming "GO AWAY" even if they're upright and lunging forward (especially then). Dogs who are quiet... not necessarily so much. The intent there can be much scarier.
 
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