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Discussion Starter #1
Today was the first day the youngest of my group had a beef RMB. She's had chicken wings before and just gobbled those up, but this beef "soup bone" took her forever! She seemed so confused with it at first and it took her a looong time to actually start chewing. It took her a couple of hours to get through it.

Should I have picked it up sooner? Is there any danger in leaving a RMB out for a few hours?
 

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You're talking about the marrow/shank bones that you just buy at a grocery store, correct? basically just a leg bone cut up into pieices?

I still have rib bones and marrow/soup/shank bones lying around my house from months ago.. I'm still finding a few underneath my furniture, bed, etc too.. I dunno.. we're all still alive, so I can't say its harmful.
 

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After seeing a farm dog waddle out to the ditch to gnaw on a roadkilled deer for an entire week (darn highway department ruined his fun by collecting the deer!) during the summer (!), with no obvious ill effects, I've decided to not worry about that kind of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You're talking about the marrow/shank bones that you just buy at a grocery store, correct? basically just a leg bone cut up into pieices?

I still have rib bones and marrow/soup/shank bones lying around my house from months ago.. I'm still finding a few underneath my furniture, bed, etc too.. I dunno.. we're all still alive, so I can't say its harmful.
Honestly I'm not quite sure what they were. They were labeled "soup bones', but I've never actually feed those before. I pictured them a little less meaty.They were all crates while they enjoyed the bones, so I wasn't so much as worried about finding them later, as I was of Ellie eating meat that had sitting at room temperate for a few hours (I don't know, I just could swear I read somewhere that you shouldn't leave it out too long?)
 

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Dogs have a much shorter digestive track than we do, so they don't get as sick with stuff like this as we would - thank goodness! I'd be careful yourself though, handling the bones.
 

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Be careful feeding those kinds of bones. The best rule to follow is to not feed the weight bearing bones (leg, shoulder, etc.) of large ungulates (cattle, deer, pigs). Dogs can break teeth on those bones very easily. Chicken is great--most rib bones are fine. Pig tails are great. Avoid the "marrow bones" though unless you want dental problems.
 

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Be careful feeding those kinds of bones. The best rule to follow is to not feed the weight bearing bones (leg, shoulder, etc.) of large ungulates (cattle, deer, pigs). Dogs can break teeth on those bones very easily. Chicken is great--most rib bones are fine. Pig tails are great. Avoid the "marrow bones" though unless you want dental problems.
i wouldn't worry too much about venison bone or pig legs....but i certainly agree with you about cow, elk, moose...these bones are so dense they are a slab fracture waiting to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Be careful feeding those kinds of bones. The best rule to follow is to not feed the weight bearing bones (leg, shoulder, etc.) of large ungulates (cattle, deer, pigs). Dogs can break teeth on those bones very easily. Chicken is great--most rib bones are fine. Pig tails are great. Avoid the "marrow bones" though unless you want dental problems.
To be totally honest, I'm not sure what kind of bones the were. The label say beef soup bones, but they were way more meat then bone. It didn't look like any part that was weight bearing, like the round cut marrow bones, which is what I always assumed soup bones were? I kind of think these were scraps and were just labeled soup bones.
 
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