Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We adopted Dixie, a 1 - 2 year old beagle smooth coat collie mix, she is a sweetheart. We adopted her to play with our Newfoundland pup Boris (5 1/2 months), yet we wanted a dog who is calm around my 13 1/2 year old Collie mix. So far everything has worked out great, her and Boris romp and play together all the time, and since we have adopted her, Boris stopped jumping on top of Samson (the old dog) and so Sam's hips are feeling better and he is able to rest happily.

ANYWHO, She showed no signs of food aggression, they drank from the same water bowl, nibbled out of the same bowl (We "do" feed them all separate but we have forgotten to pick up food left over from Boris at times) We feed them Taste of the Wild, so its pretty tasty stuff.

Today I came home from work and brought each dog a medium size, greenie type chew stick. Separated the old man to the baby gate since he likes to eat his then eat the others, he is not aggressive though, just loves the chew sticks. I made Boris and Dixie sit and handed each of them a stick. Dixie went to chew on hers, we tested her aggression by petting her and poking the stick, she didn't show any care. Later that night, after we returned from the park. Boris never ate his stick and had it in the living room, she walked over and took it from him, and he let her. BUT once she had it, he walked by and she went after him. I mean she jumped him, noone was hurt, no blood or anything major. Boris was afraid to go near her after that for a good while, we quickly picked up the chew stick and put it away.

I would like to know tips on how to redirect this behavior. She has been passed around back and forth to the pound Once for chasing a pet pig, once for barking at a neighbor, once because the dog she was adopted with chased a pet, besides this one thing she is a wonderful dog and we want to make this work. We would love to stay her forever home, no more passing her around. But we do not want Boris to pick up food aggression because of her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
My whippet/herding dog mix has a similar issue with raw bones, she strongly protects them even though nobody wants them. She got really strange with them (snarling and showing her teeth to a wall) recently, and they went off the shopping list. From what I have learned it is common for females to throw weight around and act dominant with other dogs in the house. This is clearly resource guarding of the chew.

I would try using another type of chew and see if she acts similar with it, I would also want to know if she will do it with you around. I am not a pro with resource guarding behaviors, so I would suggest that you find a trainer to help with this, or at least a book on the topic to point you in a proper direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I know we are about to start Boris on Basic training classes soon at the training center and we just got through discussing with my fiancee of seeing if they can help her as well. Classes are not cheap and we arent that well off, but thankfuly he too, has a heart for her and thinks it might be worth a shot. I have also started on the "NILIF" I think that's what your post calls it here. We did the similar training for my old dog Samson years ago, he is very relaxed and well behaved. We started on Boris but have not been as strict, but I think with the introduction of the new girl we are going to pick it back up and become pretty strict on it.

I have noticed she still seems unsure of everything here, and given what litte we know about her past, I can not blaim her. I think starting to show her who is in charge will help relax her, make her more at ease. She does not panic but you can tell with her ears and eyes. she's trying to figure the house pack out.

I am still looking for tips we can do at home to help with her. I plan to work with her a bit everyday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,393 Posts
I'm not positive that she did anything "wrong." She had a chew stick, Boris came over to get "her" chew stick. She told him to back off [I imagine that she growled at him before he got close, but that he ignored the hard stare and growl warning], and then snarked him, with no intent of drawing blood (?)

The mistake was allowing her to take "his" chewstick. I'm going to stick my neck out with a non-positive way, and maybe we'll get a better suggestion:
Calmly, tell her "No," take her chewstick and return it to Boris. This has to be immediate or it won't work... Then, given her a fresh chewstick. I'm not sure that she even needs to know what "no" means. Obviously, you can't do this if she is resource aggressive with people, but it sounds like she wasn't. However, if she growls at you, then back off. Try again later when you can catch it in the act.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Some good news is there has to be something we missed, I am starting to think Boris might have tried to "Play" with her while she had the stick. I have been testing her with small simple treats to see how she reacts and I see her excitement to get it, but nothing negative. Besides the ears showing she does not want to lose the treat to someone else, she has not yet turned to fight for one.

She got a hold of his chew bone last night, we forgot it was on the floor when she was in the back yard. He walked by her a few times she did not pay him any mind, she moved away from him once but that was about it. I of course, am still getting used to her quirks, so I kindly reached down and took the bone from her, gave her a biscuit instead, and told her what a good girl she was.

I have never adopted from the pound before, she is my first personal pup I have not grown up with, or knew the parents of. SO she is teaching me on how to teach her.

I am happy to receive tips on welcoming a pound puppy as well. She already knows where "her" blanket is at night, and is starting to understand that if she wants outside she has to sit, I go out first, followed by our old man Samson, then she comes. She does not jump up to stand against us for attention like she used to, we started working on that first, ignoring her or turning away, once she is on the ground and looking like she is giving up, I ask her to sit, then I kneel and give her pets and loves.

I am really hoping over time she adjusts well to us, as well as us to her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,393 Posts
I don't see her responses, as you've described them, as bad, just normal. She stole his stick, it was hers, he came to get it, she snarked it... he learned that what's hers is hers... and it went no further.

I think that you do want to teach her not to steal from him, and the way that you're going sounds fine. I believe that most dogs live in a "world of scarcity" where they fight to protect what little they get. However, Boris lives in a "world of plenty" (?) and isn't worried about losing out. My dog is also like that... but I don't know how to teach it to Dixie, but the way you're progressing sounds good. Maybe you can take away her treats, reward her, and then give her back her treats... in addition to trading her when she steals... when you can't prevent it.

Also, there's a philosophical difference on the Forum. I strongly believe in teaching a dog that he is never allowed to resource guard or to guard food, starting with handfeeding little puppies from their bowl, while sitting on the ground and petting them. They may not like it, but they get used to it, like everything else we impose on them. This helps to reduce or prevent accidents with children and pets.

In any case, Dixie learned some survival skills, or didn't yet learn good 'civilized' social skills. So, you'll have to teach her your rules, which fork is the salad fork, and other good canine etiquette.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top