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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Advice wanted. I have taken two dogs from a sheepdog training business purely to regime them but I’ve fallen in love with them.

I have an issue with one who was incredibly aggressive to men has now stopped once I’m with him.
Ive two issues: A workman tried to come in the gate (he had met him previously with me) but he continued to come in even though the dog was trying to stop him. He nipped his hand tore a piece from his trousers.
The second is a kid came down with a stick banging it and he jumped the 5ft fence. Luckily I was there. He has came on well since this and allows the kids to pet him but again I’m terrified every time in case a kid comes in and he bites. I have a therapist coming in two months but in the meantime I’m terrified.
The dog is amazing with women and kids especially my two year old.
Any advice. I don’t want to be sued obviously and everyone is saying put him down.
 

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By "sheep dog" I assume you mean Border Collie?

The biting behavior is most concerning. The dog, as you note, is very intelligent.

It is likely you will need a Veterinary Behaviourist to sort the dog out. Until that can be arranged the dog must be strictly managed. Gates, pens, on leash when outside, crated when workman come, crated when visitors come.

Be careful.
 

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Does this dog have a bite history, meaning has he bitten people in the past badly enough that they've needed medical attention and/or it's been reported to the authorities? Did he break the skin when he nipped the workman?

Even if the answer to both of these questions is "no", you're going to need to practice more careful containment practices in the short term at the very least. If the answer to either is "yes", I would encourage you to figure out long-term solutions to make sure there's as little risk as humanely possible of him coming into contact with strangers outside of controlled, supervised interactions. As you implied, this is for your and his protection as well as that of the people he interacts with, because if he seriously bites someone you could be looking at legal consequences and euthanasia.

The fence either needs to be altered/replaced with one tall enough that he can't jump over it, or he needs a secondary containment measure when he's outside, whether that's an enclosed kennel, being on-leash with a person, or a secure tie-out that's too short for him to reach the fence or gate (super important - dogs have strangled to death jumping over fences while on tie-outs). If strangers need to enter your fenced yard when you're not there (postal workers, workmen, etc.), then he can't have access to that area of the yard at all when you can't be there watching him, whether that means more fencing or keeping him inside (or in a totally enclosed outside kennel) when you can't supervise him. If strangers don't need to enter the fenced area, put a padlock on the gate to prevent misunderstandings. If your fence is easy to see through, like chain link, look into privacy options for your type of fencing and try to find a way to block his view of the street. It might not help if a kid is actually knocking the fence with a stick, but it could make him less inclined to try to jump over if he can't see what's on the other side. But do NOT trust this alone to be enough when he's already successfully jumped the fence once.

Many herding dogs do nip when they're stressed or overstimulated, but as this dog has a history of being "incredibly aggressive", it's a smart thing to take it as seriously as you are. Unfortunately, if you're not physically or financially able to confine him in a way that can keep the public safe (which is totally understandable, fences are expensive!), it might be best to find him an experienced home that has a better set up and is willing and able to work with his biting. I hope it doesn't come to that, and that the person you have scheduled can give you lots of help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi I don’t know if the dog has a bite history but the people training the dog I say have abused them. The other border collie is extremely nervous and I can’t move my hands without him running. The other dog was like this also. Terrified of sticks everything.

To me it was fear aggression and now it’s territorial behaviour. He will allow people to pet him at the fence now and is very good when outside with me going for a walk.

I have fenced in the area and fenced the back area also. I do tie him and will continue this but I will need to adjust the fence at the back.

I wonder will neutering help also.

Thanks for your responses. QUOTE="DaySleepers, post: 5318021, member: 39708"]
Does this dog have a bite history, meaning has he bitten people in the past badly enough that they've needed medical attention and/or it's been reported to the authorities? Did he break the skin when he nipped the workman?

Even if the answer to both of these questions is "no", you're going to need to practice more careful containment practices in the short term at the very least. If the answer to either is "yes", I would encourage you to figure out long-term solutions to make sure there's as little risk as humanely possible of him coming into contact with strangers outside of controlled, supervised interactions. As you implied, this is for your and his protection as well as that of the people he interacts with, because if he seriously bites someone you could be looking at legal consequences and euthanasia.

The fence either needs to be altered/replaced with one tall enough that he can't jump over it, or he needs a secondary containment measure when he's outside, whether that's an enclosed kennel, being on-leash with a person, or a secure tie-out that's too short for him to reach the fence or gate (super important - dogs have strangled to death jumping over fences while on tie-outs). If strangers need to enter your fenced yard when you're not there (postal workers, workmen, etc.), then he can't have access to that area of the yard at all when you can't be there watching him, whether that means more fencing or keeping him inside (or in a totally enclosed outside kennel) when you can't supervise him. If strangers don't need to enter the fenced area, put a padlock on the gate to prevent misunderstandings. If your fence is easy to see through, like chain link, look into privacy options for your type of fencing and try to find a way to block his view of the street. It might not help if a kid is actually knocking the fence with a stick, but it could make him less inclined to try to jump over if he can't see what's on the other side. But do NOT trust this alone to be enough when he's already successfully jumped the fence once.

Many herding dogs do nip when they're stressed or overstimulated, but as this dog has a history of being "incredibly aggressive", it's a smart thing to take it as seriously as you are. Unfortunately, if you're not physically or financially able to confine him in a way that can keep the public safe (which is totally understandable, fences are expensive!), it might be best to find him an experienced home that has a better set up and is willing and able to work with his biting. I hope it doesn't come to that, and that the person you have scheduled can give you lots of help!
[/QUOTE]
 
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