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Discussion Starter #1
In general how long is too long between sending an application and getting a reply?

What is the rule on correspondence between more than one rescue? Is it rude to be in contact with rescues on two different dogs?

Also to any rescuers or fosters out there, how honest are you guys about the dogs?
 

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The group that I volunteer with tries to reply to all inquiries within 24 hours, but I know from experience that time frame isn't always typical. Most groups are comprised of volunteers that have day jobs and are responding in the evenings and during free time. That really isn't an excuse to leave inquiries unanswered for days or weeks though, IMO. If I didn't get a response after three days, I would try to contact them again.

I think it is absolutely fine to be in contact with two rescues, particularly if you are having trouble getting in touch with one of them. You should be concerned with finding the dog that you "click" with; it may not be the first one you meet.

I foster both dogs and cats, and I am always honest, especially about the negative things. I look at it this way - if I lie just to get a dog placed, it isn't likely an adoption that will stick. Everyone has their non-negotiables, and whether I agree that they are legitimate or not doesn't matter. A family that adopts a dog that is ill-suited for them and their home is just asking for trouble.

I know that some groups or individuals do try and gloss over a dogs issues. I think the only way that you can be sure is to meet the dog in person and see if your impression of the dog lines up with what the foster parent has told you.
 

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Why would it be rude to contact them about more than one animal? or even contact multiple rescues?

If it is, then I'm the rudest woman in Ohio! and that's ok if they want to say it behind my back.... the nuts and bolts reality is, I have to do what is right for everyone concerned, I need to make a well thought out, deliberate decision. This impacts all of our lives, these animals deserve to be loved and cherished. They already got the short end of the stick once, who am I to short change them again?!

Hubby and I have been looking for another rescue dog for about 6 weeks. I have spoken to numerous rescues, visited with one dog, have another visit with a second one tomorrow. Hubby says maybe I'm making it harder than it needs to be. In 2004, it took me 8 weeks to find Zoey in a shelter a couple hundred miles away in Rural Michigan, she's been worth EVERY minute and every mile!

As far as the info I've been provided, well, that's all in the eye of the beholder... I would characterize Zoey as exuberant, other people might feel intimidated by her. Something one person feels is managable, I might not have the skill set for. It's up to us, as the adopter to be honest with the Rescue Volunteers. My experience is the volunteers have been very willing to partner up with me to make the right placement. If they have thoughts about something I need to change to be a better pet parent, then I'm all ears! One told me I needed to work on restablishing myself as the person, instead of "poochie pez dispenser." (my phrasing, not hers)

Then again, I might be every rescue's nightmare. Ok, I'm not a nightmare, but I'm probably not a dream come true either, at least they know I'm committed to whatever dog we bring home.
 

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I was pretty honest with anyone who approached me, the only time I wasn't upfront was the few people who came for puppies from the litter that I had raised who were NOT imo a good, responsible home (one being the people next door who didn't have fence/gates and their dogs used our front yard as the bathroom or the park, the other being someone in the area who complained a lot about my 12 year old calm golden being 'a lot of dog' yet wanted the hyper busy puppy because 'he looked cool) - I just called the rescue and said 'do not adopt to...' and why.

The dog I had who had aggression issues, I told whoever contacted me about it. The dogs who were great, same thing. I was dissapointed the rescue DIDN'T tell people about the one dog, she was great, just not with other dogs, not a big deal!
 

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There is no across the board rule. All rescues are separate entities. I don't know how they would find out you inquired on dogs at different rescues, but I doubt many will care. I work for a shelter and we often have people who come and meet a dog, and then go to another rescue to meet a dog they're interested in there. No harm in that.

I like the way the previous poster put it. It is in the eye of the beholder. We have the "meet your match" system and half the time I completely disagree with the levels they put the dogs at. They are put at these levels by a person who meets with them one time for up to a half an hour while I'm with them every day for hours. It's not as if the person determining those is TRYING to do a disservice to the dog, they just don't know. In the event I'm grabbed to answer a potential adopters question, I am always honest about the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So it wouldn't be pesky to call tomorrow (Wednesday), after applying last Thursday? I realize rescue organizations are mostly run by volunteers and would hate to be a burden to people I respect a great deal and I'm hoping to adopt from.

I'm in no rush, just would love to meet the dog ASAP.
 

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I don't think it would be a big deal. I volunteer for another rescue run entirely for volunteers and they make a point to return emails/phone calls within 48 hours. Sometimes things get busy and over looked at other places, so I would give them a call.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you.

One last question for all the insiders; What reason are most applications denied?

My vet check should be great. My current dog is healthy, happy and sociable. I own my house and live a stable life. I don't keep up on heartworm prevention and have a very small fenced backyard to my name. All but the pickiest rescues would be fine with this correct? Anything I should say or do?

As you can tell, my first dog was from a breeder.
 

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Definitely depends on the rescue organization again. I would say that a rescue might deny you if you state you don't keep up on heartworm preventative but they have no reason to ask that, or they might agree and not care. I don't personally do it year round either. Doesn't make me a bad owner, but some people won't see that. Some deny based on fence status, some don't care.

If they do vet references your vet can't say "Well, they came in and did these medical treatments, and then they come in every year for vaccinations but they didn't buy HW preventative these months!." Every vet reference I have done they're just allowed to tell me the person does in fact use their vet offices and the person had to notify the vet first that a rescue would be calling in order to do that. Neither the rescue I volunteer or work for has a question about heartworm, or about the size of the yard (one does home checks, one does not)

I would just fill out the application as honestly and briefly as possible.
 

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None of the rescues I've applied to have asked about HW meds. The question I run into the most is about how much time the dog will spend alone, and how will that time be spent.

Size of the yard is of little consequence because the yard is for pottying anyway, exercise is walks and playing with the family.

My spidey sense could be wrong, but I feel like maybe you're worried about being judged for having a dog from a breeder? If that's the case, don't. When we adopted Zoey, out resident canine senior citizen was a pet store puppy. He had a rare auto immune disease that was the direct result of being from a puppy mill. We made an uninformed choice when we bought him, but we stuck with him until he died at 12. They respected that even though we made a mistake, we tried our very best to give him a good life. That's their biggest concern.
 

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And remember, all rescues are different. Don't paint them with the same brush! A terrible experience with one does not predict a bad expereince with another.

I have been turned down 3 times and considered a very desireable adoptor a half dozen times. Neither means anything really. I have been turned down because, and I quote, "You have other dogs and no dog should have to share the love." I have been turned down for having same-gender dogs. I was turned down once because the dog was heart-worm positive and I wanted to treat the illness with my own vet. It's all fine. I just stayed calm and polite. There are about 10 million dogs out there that I can love. There will always be another. There is no "perfect" dog and I don't believe in magical connections that happen through photos and 10 minute meet and greets.

Remember that most rescues are volunteer run. Even if the people are rude or flakey, they are giving of themselves in ways that most of us don't. Honor that and filter out all of the crap! Adopting can go smoothly or it can be a wild ride. It's always worth it in the end.

And most important: TAKE NOTHING PERSONALLY!!!! These people do not know you, so do not invest in their judgements about you, good or bad. It's hard, but it help the process a lot if you can take this advice!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
None of the rescues I've applied to have asked about HW meds. The question I run into the most is about how much time the dog will spend alone, and how will that time be spent.

Size of the yard is of little consequence because the yard is for pottying anyway, exercise is walks and playing with the family.

My spidey sense could be wrong, but I feel like maybe you're worried about being judged for having a dog from a breeder? If that's the case, don't. When we adopted Zoey, out resident canine senior citizen was a pet store puppy. He had a rare auto immune disease that was the direct result of being from a puppy mill. We made an uninformed choice when we bought him, but we stuck with him until he died at 12. They respected that even though we made a mistake, we tried our very best to give him a good life. That's their biggest concern.
The heartqorm question stemmed from a question on the application about heartworm prevention.

Oh no, I hope I didn't present it that way, breeders are just another way to bring a dog home, our dog was from a great breeder and she's never had a problem.
 

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The heartqorm question stemmed from a question on the application about heartworm prevention.

Oh no, I hope I didn't present it that way, breeders are just another way to bring a dog home, our dog was from a great breeder and she's never had a problem.
Sometimes my "spidey sense" is glitchy. :)
 
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