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As one of my "future dogs" to one day own, I really want a rescue greyhound. Has anyone adopted one of these rescue dogs and how are they? What are your experiences with a rescue greyhound?
 

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I've been thinking about a retired greyhound, too. I started a thread not too long ago: greyhounds and received some very helpful advice. I'm also interested to see any new information that posted here.
 

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Cool, I will check out your thread :D I meant a lady with a couple of retired greyhounds a year ago. They were so beautiful and well-mannered. I should of asked her more questions >.<
 

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I dont own one but met one is petsmart! So calm and loved everyone. The owner said she enjoyed her daily walks but also laying on the couch sleeping is one of her favorite activities,lol.
 

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My husband and I considered a greyhound, but then I read up on them on a rescue site in the Atlanta area. Many have issues around small dogs b/c they're bred to chase small creatures. Also, because they're sight hounds, they must be kept on a leash when not in a fenced enclosure - no exceptions, again, because of their tendency to chase anything that moves. If we didn't already have a small poodle, we probably would have gotten one - I love the fact that they can be couch potatoes, but also need some exercise! Some are small dog tolerant, and they apparently get adopted fast!
 

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As with any breed there are some downsides to greyhounds, but overall they are a great fairly healthy and long lived breed. They are a large breed which means they have access to every thing from the floor to the counter. Retired racers have a tendency to be dog aggressive and go after anything smaller than they are. Greyhounds also have thin skin that tears easily, so rough play may end up with a trip to the vet.
 

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I considered getting one for my next dog for some time, but then realised I would want something a bit more trainable. Not that greyhounds can't be trained of course, but I want something that was bred to work with me, like a rottie or malinois or something along those lines. So depends what's important in a dog. If all you want is a laid back pet I think greyhounds are great, but if you really enjoy the training aspect of dog keeping I wouldn't get one.
 

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They're on my list for next dog, but I may have to change that if they're really that prone to chasing small dogs! I had no idea! GSD was my other option but that would likely be a mostly-shepherd mix from the shelter. I'll have to make sure I ask about small dogs specifically if I do get one.
 

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Funny, this thread started 5 days after our very 1st retired Greyhound here for boarding. He's 12 yrs old and very nice in kennel. The owner said they had dropped lead on him once and he was gone. Their young son chased after and got lucky cause dog stopped to investigate a dog in yard or he would still be running.

I can see how accidents could happen because he actually is so quiet he/they could lull a person into a false sense of security. As I said my 1st and only visit with one.
 

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As with any breed there are some downsides to greyhounds, but overall they are a great fairly healthy and long lived breed. They are a large breed which means they have access to every thing from the floor to the counter. Retired racers have a tendency to be dog aggressive and go after anything smaller than they are. Greyhounds also have thin skin that tears easily, so rough play may end up with a trip to the vet.
Can anyone elaborate on this? My understanding is that greys are generally good with other dogs of approximately the same size as they have been living with trackmates. Yes, many do chase small furry critters - including other dogs - as that is what they have been bred and trained to do, but that a tendency to be dog aggressive is not common.
 

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I've heard that they tend to be good with other dogs, due to living in kennels with other dogs, so they are well socialised with other dogs and people. I can't imagine that someone would keep a dog aggressive greyhound around for long.
 

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Can anyone elaborate on this? My understanding is that greys are generally good with other dogs of approximately the same size as they have been living with trackmates. Yes, many do chase small furry critters - including other dogs - as that is what they have been bred and trained to do, but that a tendency to be dog aggressive is not common.
A former neighbor of ours has 2 retired greys and he works with a local rescue. Whenever we would pass each other during dog walks, he always moved off the sidewalk to keep his dogs from getting too close to Molly. He said he didn't trust them with small dogs because of the small dog aggression issue. Once his wife was walking their two and he was walking two that they were watching for the day & one of those snarled and snapped at Molly.
In terms of exercise, he said a 45 minute walk in the morning did the trick and they just happily lazed around for the rest of the day.
 

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This is a breed we'd like to bring into our home. We have a fenced in yard, while one of our dogs is short legged, he's not little. I've never heard of a dog aggressive retired racer but I suppose it's possible.
 

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My brother and his wife adopted two retired racing greyhounds and they are very sweet dogs. They came completely house broken and crate trained, but they had to be taught to walk up and down stairs, walk on carpet, and other things that they had never encountered before. They wear their muzzles when they take them to the greyhound park, but they have never shown any aggression towards anything. Argos escaped one day from the house and wandered down to the local elementary school down the road and just got a bunch of lovings from the kids until someone read the address on his collar and took him home. When they got married in April they had the reception at the house and I was truly amazed at how well behaved they were. There were several little kids running around and playing with them and they just walked around then laid down and went to sleep.

The one thing that drove me nuts about them was the counter surfing and the stealing. The dogs have no boundaries and will eat anything anyone leaves on the counter. The only safe spot in their house was on top of the fridge, in the toaster oven, and in the microwave. And if you had any purse of bag Argos would go through and steal something out to move it about the house.
 

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Retired racers have a tendency to be dog aggressive and go after anything smaller than they are.
This is realy a misconception. Retired races are rarely aggressive with other dogs as such. There are exceptions, but they are few and far between.

However, many retired racers that have actively trained for racing - again with some exceptions - have a highly developed prey drive (not the same thing as dog aggression). And that will manifest itself with more or less ANY small creature - whether it is a cat, a small dog, or just about anything else.

Greyhound adoption groups test all incomng greys for cat tolerance, small dog tolerance, and genereral temperament. However, if you have another dog of any size in the house, they will insist that you come in for a meet between your current dog and the specific grey that you are interested in. There is a lot of individual compatibility that is involved.
 

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I've heard that they tend to be good with other dogs, due to living in kennels with other dogs, so they are well socialised with other dogs and people. I can't imagine that someone would keep a dog aggressive greyhound around for long.
Retired racers have lived with other greys their entire life. Many of them actually want the company of other dogs of about the same size. and do better in a household where there is another medium-to-large dog for them to interact with. Small dogs are another thing, however.

You are correct in a sense about general dog aggression. It's very uncommon in racing greyhounds. But it is not completely unheard of. Greys who "interfere" (read "go after other greys") on the track are not kept for racing. However, some do end up in the adoption chain for that very reason. All the adoption groups test for tolerance with other dogs, as well as for cat and small dog tolerance.
 

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They're on my list for next dog, but I may have to change that if they're really that prone to chasing small dogs! I had no idea! GSD was my other option but that would likely be a mostly-shepherd mix from the shelter. I'll have to make sure I ask about small dogs specifically if I do get one.
I don't think GSD mixes have any particular issues with small dogs like greyhounds do. Obvs, any dog can be dog aggressive or just not like your adorable Roxie, but I don't think it's a breed specific thing, unless the other side of the mix is greyhound maybe.
 

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We've interacted with Greys that are up for adoption at PetsMart, and my neighbor has had two.

I think the most remarkable trait is how placid they are. The ones that we interacted with had no problems with Yorkies or with my 60 lb dog. The Greys were curious and interested, although one did give a snarl.... I attributed that to the possibility of having a grouch in any crowd :) I've never seen one off leash, but I can imagine that they might run or chase, as a sight hound.

Most of them were mature or seniors, and happy to sleep a lot. I never saw one sitting, either standing or lying down. Not sure if that's a normal physical issue.
 
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