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Discussion Starter #1
My Clumber is 7 years old, low activity, but loves to play around the house with her toys. Spends most of the day napping.
She has very mild hip dysplasia. It's not uncomfortable for her, but she cannot jump, and I would like for her to be on a food that is good for her joints.
With the recent death of her littermate, she has been very depressed and has lost a bit of weight. She is still eating, but much less. She should be about 55 pounds, and she is currently 49 pounds.
She had entropion surgery to reclaim some of her lost vision, and is doing very well, but I would like to try to preserve the vision she has left.
She has always eaten Purina, but I would really like to get her on a natural dog food. I just want my best friend to live a long, happy life with me. I want her to be the best she can be.

I'm in college, so I would prefer dry food recommendations for the sake of convenience, but am open to trying any kind of diet as long as it will benefit her.
Cost is not an issue.

Please help!
 

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49 lbs may be better for her than 55 if she has HD. My own dog has a hip issue and the vet is really firm about keeping him very lean to keep the weight off the joint.

That said, there are a lot of high protein, grain free foods that would be great for your dog, such as Taste of the Wild, Canidae, Acana, Wellness Core and Blue Wilderness. I like to rotate between all of them, but my dog isn't bothered by food switches, either. If you are feeding Purina, you need to feed less of the grain free. Purina is full of fillers, so you have to feed more. I'd start at around 75% of what you're feeding now and adjust up or down depending on her weight.

Now, for the HD, you need to start giving supplements, specifically glucosamine and fish oil. While all the food listed have these in them, they have them in normal dietary amounts, not therapeutic amounts. My dog is 45 lbs and I give him 1/3 of the human dose of glucosamine and fish oil. It really has made a difference in his mobility, and the fish oil seems to have improved his coat. I dose him by grinding up human glucosamine tablets in a coffee grinder and putting it in his treats and poking a hole in the fish oil capsule and squeezing it onto a plate for him to lick up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well she's really underweight and both of her vets want her to gain weight.

I take glucosamine, the human tablets are safe for the dog?

I'll definitely get her the fish oil, and would you recommend her going grain free? Are all of those food brands available at a pet supply store? I know they carry Blue Wilderness, but I've never heard of the others!

Thank you so much for your response!
 

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If your vets want her to gain weight, then she should. I just wanted to be sure.

The only problem with human grade tablets is the enteric coating. Dogs have very short digestive systems, so they can't break it down well enough to get much out of the tablet, which is why I grind it up.

I prefer grain free. As I said, dogs don't really have digestive system for grains, and it can cause problems in dogs. My own dog gets ear infections if he eats grains. Different pet supply stores have different brands. PetSmart only has Wellness Core and Blue Wilderness, but Pet Supplies Plus has all the above brands. You can also order them online.
 

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Thanks so much!
We have Pet Supplies Plus here, and I'm unfamiliar with their selection, because where I'm from only has Petsmart and I'm just here for school!

She has a very sensitive digestive system, I'll try the grain-free food!
 
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