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I grew up training a chocolate lab and later an eskimo spitz. Both of those puppies seemed super easy to train with treats. We have a pomsky now that I'm struggling to get to come to me. He likes treats, but he's not super excited about them (my lab would run through barbed wire for a treat:) So, what I've been trying with this pup is when I know he's hungry, I'll put his food on the floor between my legs, and I'll say "come" and he'll come up until about 4 or 5 feet from me and then sit and stare at me. So, while saying "come" I start to pull up towards me and the food in a higher pitched voice saying come and then when he's at the food say "Good dog!" and he eats. I can often get him to come also for some treats but it's slow for him to come all the way up to me taking the food from my hand. He's not even super excited to go outside (prefers being indoors) so calling him to the door with "come" to go out doesn't motivate him either.
Is this something that will change as he gets older? or should I try some other techniques. Most techniques I'm reading about rely so much on positive rewards with treats, but this dog doesn't seem that motivated them. Should I maybe I try with treats before his afternoon meal when he should be hungrier?
Thanks for any advice.
 

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The thing is that "treat" is sort of a catch-all word in dog training. some dogs are not especially motivated by food, and the treat is actually a short game of tug or fetch or play with a favorite toy that only comes out during training, or it's praise. Or, it may be just for the dog to get to do something the dog wants to do.
I use a variety of things in my training.

Also, before giving up on treats, try a lot of different things, simply because training with food is easier most of the time if you can find something your dog will work for.
some ideas:
boiled fat free chicken breast, cut up into tiny pieces
tiny pieces of hot dog
string cheese
squeeze cheese
liverwurst (very carefully used and small amounts, as it can upset the system if too much)
tiny pieces of cooked steak

and so on.

working with the dog when he is hungry is fine - just make sure that you don't give so much to the dog that the dog doesn't want his meal afterwards.
 

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Don't feed his meal until after training. He needs to be hungry. Use treats that are better than regular food.
 

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Not personally experienced or all that familiar with the breed mix, but as any husky owner will tell you, recall problems, wanderlust and escape artistry are common husky breed characteristics. The question is which behavioral characteristics will they inherit? Did a little web searching and there's dozens of youtube videos and perusing the comments from Pomsky owners, their characteristic often lean to one side or the other .... huskies are very independent, high energy and often posses the characteristics above ....The Pom side however will tend to be very attached, the Pom having being nicknamed the "velcro dog". From the web search found the following common Pomsky traits

"he's a great watch dog and "alerts" when something is up. She loves all animals & people. If she gets out the door she will not come when called (Husky) trait. It took an hour to to get her back in the mountains. I've got to find a good trainer to have her heel & return when called (off Leash). "

Among the cons listed:
  • Can be challenging to train
  • A great escape-artist
Another trait that first-time owners aren't often prepared for is that they can be quite willful and stubborn, making them difficult to train in spite of their high intelligence.

"From their Husky side, Pomskies inherit an adventurous and bold personality. They can be a bit stubborn, and will naturally take on the role of pack leader. And, like Huskies, these little wolf-like dogs have a burning desire to see the world. They may not be able to hop a fence, but they can be wanderers and escape artists, just like their Arctic ancestors.

"It’s important to remember that Pomskies have a running streak in them. Unless you’re dedicated to training perfect recall, it’s a good idea to keep the Pomsky in an enclosed area or on a leash. A training area with few distractions will also be ideal for a distractible dog like the Pomsky."


When looking at the two breed's characteristics, the mix seems a perfect combination if both genetics kinda "meet in the middle" ... but be prepared for them tolean heavily to lean to one side or the other as was the case with one of our dogs ...appearance all GSD; behaviors all husky....see Items 2,4 & 5. The other one makes me doubt the husky heritage or she just leans heavily to the GDS side.

Speaking from my own experience with the husky half, they are not all that enthralled by treats ... when we had just the one, I observed some very strange behaviors in this regard:

  • She loves playing a game of "hide and seek". While she's out taking care of late night business,I'd hide treats around the room. When being let in, she'd zoom to the den and begin the hunt .... using puzzles to keep them mentally stimulated is highly recommended by breeders and trainers.
  • And yet when she's laying in her doggie bed and I toss a treat her way, if she can't reach it from her reclined position,she shows no interest, as if telling me "Unless you get of your tail and bring that closer, I'm not getting up"
We have two rescued mixed breed GSD / Husky dogs. We know the mix of the older dog (knew the parents) , she looks all GSD but her brain is all Husky. She was an "apartment dog and was crated for a time 10-12,sometimes14 hours per day. Oddly, "go to your crate" command is immediately followed (my guess is indoors she knows she can't get away). But I could hold a steak in front of her after not being fed that day and she's if if she slips a leash or zipline, she's gone. At the dog park especially,if we're sitting down she will usually come when called but if we get up to leave ...she wants to stay and will not come within "grabbing range". Yet,she will approach other park humans when called;she knows what the command means, she's just stubbornly refusing as play is better than treats.

She was well out of the puppy stage making this harder than it would have been from an early age. We tried training recall with a long leash .... she was too well aware that she could be reeled in, the constant tug of the spring lead reminding her of it constantly. We had been training her in the fall using a 200' surveyors tape .... no spring load, very light in weight with sound cues. Immediate response maybe 2/3 of the time, a light tug required for the other. Between 5 weeks of rain and now bitter cold, have had suspended training. Next step, weather permitting, will try the long leash and a sound / vibration collar. I'm opposed to shock collars, spray collars and other negative reinforcement. The noise vibration is functional just to break their attention.

Before this I was 2-1 with recall training with other peoples huskies / mixes.... the puppies were a reasonable success ...19 / 20 times and the Owners continued reinforcing the behavior. The older dog, after 2 weeks I had to give up.... Glad to help another person as it's an enjoyable activity anytime but after 2 weeks, life demands that I get back things in my own life. After that, that dog was never off the leash or out of the yard .....but was probably "bailed out" of the local shelter 10- 15times. I heard one of the town shelter staff teased the Owners by using a label maker to put his name on one of their bowls.

Being a designer breed about a decade old

You will likely benefit from sharing information with other Pomsky owners ... I don't social media so never been there but there is a facebook group

There's a book

And dozens of web sites and even a Pomsky Forum (not very busy ... 33 or so posts in almost 4 years))

Finally, if you haven't done so already ... familiarize yourself with the designer breed's potential health issues by looking at common issues with the 2 breeds. While you are trainng your dog, yur attention is focused on them more intently and this is the best time to look for early signs.
 

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Another trait that first-time owners aren't often prepared for is that they can be quite willful and stubborn, making them difficult to train in spite of their high intelligence.
I am going to take strong issue with this statement. And any other such statements.

Husky type dogs tend to be independent in nature.
BUT,
No dog is stubborn. This is simply not a dog trait. It is a human trait, and attributing human traits to dogs is inaccurate and, worse than that, is doing the dog a grave disservice. Calling a dog "stubborn" or "willful" is putting the blame for lack of good training onto the dog, which is unfair and unproductive.

If a dog does not do as you ask, it is not due to "stubbornness".
It will be one or more of the following:
-the dog doesn't understand fully enough what is being asked
--the dog knows the cue, but has not generalized it to the different environment he is in
--the dog is too distracted
--the dog is not sufficiently motivated to do it
--the dog has a physical or emotional impediment to doing as asked

All of these things are correctable by the trainer.
 

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He likes treats, but he's not super excited about them (my lab would run through barbed wire for a treat:) So, what I've been trying with this pup is when I know he's hungry, I'll put his food on the floor between my legs, and I'll say "come" and he'll come up until about 4 or 5 feet from me and then sit and stare at me. So, while saying "come" I start to pull up towards me and the food in a higher pitched voice saying come and then when he's at the food say "Good dog!" and he eats.
I suggest feeding him his morning meal as treats during training, that may help with his interest/motivation. Be careful to not use the treat as a bribe to entice him to come, use the treat as a reward for coming!

Couple other things that might be helpful, try back away as you call him. Make it a game! With some puppies softening your stance by not facing them squarely can also help.

If he's playful, get him engaged with a ball or tug and use that to motivate his recall the same way, backing up as you call him. Training should be lighthearted and fun!
 

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Here's a great discussion on the mechanics and usefulness of backing up when teaching recall (and some other things).

 

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I am going to take strong issue with this statement. And any other such statements.

Husky type dogs tend to be independent in nature. BUT, No dog is stubborn.
Take issue if you must, but I think you're facing an uphill battle. I understand what you are trying to say, but do a web search using Yahoo on "Husky Stubborn" and you get 27,100,000 hits. The purpose of language is to convey meaning. Humans tend to convey meaning using their own life as a frame of reference. And there's really no arguing the point that when people use the term, there's going to be an extraordinarily small number of people who don't get the full meaning out of that statement. And it's pretty hard to find a husky owner or rescue group who doesn't agree.

"I tried to get that stain off the table but it was sure stubborn !" I tried to get that lug nut off the front wheel but man, it sure was stubborn." Are nuts and stains stubborn ? But would anyone hearing those statements be confused as to the message that is being conveyed ? It was much more difficult to reach the goal. With Husky training, generally it's a bit more difficult to reach that goal. ...some would say extraodinarily so. We can try and make it sound nice by calling it "independence" or "unmotivated" but that doesn't make any less frustrating or difficult.

Two political opponents are arguing a position and can not come to an agreement, both! walk away saying "That SoB is danged stubborn".. That's because anyone who doesn't do what you want them to is, from their point of view, stubborn. To a dog owner, they goal is to have the dog do what they want the do ... when you work with different breeds and you are using pretty much the same usually effective techniques, how does one define this particular breed's resistance to do what it is supposed to do ... "the 1st 4 lug nuts came off easy, the last one was stubborn" .. I don't see any ambiguity there. That's not rally different from a trainer saying "The shepherd, dobie and lab are doing well and will finish their training by friday but the husky is being a little bit stubborn and will need a little more work" . I don't see anyone not understanding that the Husky is the proverbial stubborn lug nut.

When your child won't listen to or obey the teacher, ...what will the note to the principal not read "Child stubbornly refuses to follow direction". No, it's not the teacher, she has 34 other students doing just fine in the same environment. The reason the child may stubbornly refuse to follow the instruction may very well be that it is distracted or unmotivated, but that's his problem not the teacher's. Every observation is point of view based. The child is exhibiting stubborn behavior, defined as "refusing change one's attitude or position on something, especially in spite of good arguments or reasons to do so." We have a confusion here between cause and effect; his reasons for exhibiting that behavior may be many but the fact remains he is still refusing to change his behavior in spite or critical reasons to do so

As far as the dog doesn't understand fully enough what is being asked, distracted, unmotivated to do it or having the the physical or emotional impediment to doing as asked. The following is more to the point.

"The Siberian Husky is an intelligent breed of dog and this can be both good and bad. Good, because they are able to comprehend what you are trying to get them to do. Bad, because they may decide they don’t want to do it. The trouble is you don’t know when they are going to be stubborn. If they are outside, having some fun playing around and you decide they need to come in now, they may choose not to. They will probably just sit there, looking at you – or lie down, pretending that they are asleep and that they can’t actually hear you. Or they may sit there and just howl in protest at your obviously ludicrous request.This stubborn-ness is difficult to fix. Even with proper formal training at an early age, some Huskies will just be more stubborn than others. All you can do is try and train it out of them using a treat-reward system. Unfortunately, this stubborn streak is just part of the package so you’ve just got to accept it may be there!"

When people label a breed as stubborn ...they mean that, "by comparison" in a general sense, all they are saying is that they tend to resist what you what them to do because they have a "you're not the boss of me" attitude more than other breeds. Just like those two politicians.

There's only 73,700 hits pairing Labrador and stubborn (Husky has 368 times as many)

"But, are Labradors stubborn? Labradors are not stubborn, they can be stubborn if they are bored due to a lack of exercise, also, if they start being stubborn suddenly then they are probably ill and need to go to the vet, however, a trained and socialized Labrador is not likely to be stubborn."

But if we are going consider the position that "everyone got it wrong", we can always fall back go to the "literal definition". To go with "no dog is stubborn", looks like we are going to have to rewrite some dictionaries. As has been discussed previously, the dictionary has it backwards.

Stubborn (Dictionary Definition): "having or showing dogged determination not to change one's attitude or position on something, especially in spite of good arguments or reasons to do so."

Dogged (Etymolgy): "having the qualities of a dog" / “characteristics similar to that of a dog”

The very dictionary definition of stubborness actual says "behaving like a dog".

If Husky owners are referring to their dogs as stubborn, Husky Rescue groups are saying Huskies are stubborn and refusing to allow adoptions to people w/o previous experience, and there over 28 million references on pairing "Husky" and "Stubborn", if I want to speak in a manner to be understood, I think it's important to use the vernacular that's most widely accepted. The causes may vary, the effect is still the same.
 

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Stubborn implies an unwillingness out of spite. Huskies definitely show "unwillingness" to do as asked but they don't do it out of spite. They do it because it's fun. The fun may be in the action itself, or it may be in the reaction from the person there, or it may simply be because the dog has "been there, done that" and just isn't interested in the desired action anymore. It is not because they are set in their ways and unwilling to give an inch.

Tornado-dog (jack russell mix) isn't stubborn, he's tenacious. When I try to redirect him from things, it takes a lot more work on my part - and he will go back to whatever I redirected him from once he gets "over" whatever I redirected him with. Because of this, it takes longer for behaviors to sink into his brain and become habits.

I always say huskies are smarter than humans and they take a perverse pleasure in proving it. They aren't being stubborn, they are enjoying messing with you.

Some dogs just get tunnel vision. They aren't being stubborn, they just don't see/hear anything outside of their line of focus.

Each of these dogs are often called stubborn and as such are commonly dealt with in the same manner to less than stellar results. Understanding why the dog is not doing what is expected helps to individualize the training. For Tornado-dog, this means lots more repetition than other dogs and time for his brain to click and think "oh yeah, when she says X, I'm supposed to do A". For a husky, this means changing things up often so he doesn't get bored and mess with you for entertainment. For a dog with tunnel vision, it means finding a way to get through the tunnel walls so she'll see/hear you.
 
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Describing an inanimate object as 'stubborn' does not risk impacting their relationship with the humans around them or their welfare going forward.

A child who consistently struggles in the classroom usually needs extra support and/or a different approach to learning. Expecting every child to learn things the exact same way and labelling the ones who don't succeed as 'stubborn' or 'obstinate' or "unwilling to learn" or any other undesirable character trait without making any effort to understand WHY they're not succeeding in that environment is setting them up for failure. This is exactly how a lot of kids 'fall through the cracks' in school systems.

Nobody is arguing that people don't call huskies and similar breeds 'stubborn'; we're arguing that it's a loaded word that negatively impacts the way an owner or handler sees the dog and interacts with it, and therefore shouldn't be used. 'Stubborn' dogs are maliciously and deliberately disobeying, after all, and need harsher handling, stronger corrections, more discipline, etc. to 'put them in their place'. It's easier to resent a dog one believes is being willfully disrespectful, and interferes with building a genuine bond.

Most so-called 'stubborn' dogs have other things going on. Maybe they're not being motivated with a reward that works for them, or maybe they haven't been taught how to have impulse control in exciting environments. They could be confused by unclear or sloppy training and genuinely have no idea what their handler is asking them to do, struggling with anxiety or pent up energy that makes engaging nearly impossible, or be feeling extra sore, tired, or even sick. The trainer could be expecting too much too quickly from them, or expecting to be able to easily overcome strong genetic drives and temperament with a bit of training.

@rickcr you've gotten some good tips here for how to build food motivation, but the truth is some dogs are just flat-out not that into food or treats. It's definitely more challenging to work with them that way, but it can be done. What else does your pup really, really enjoy? Is he really into playing tug or chasing things? Will he do a backflip for a bellyrub? Does he go nuts for you talking to him in a silly voice? You can use all these things to reinforce behaviors if you're creative (and willing to suffer a little embarrassment, in the last scenario, haha!).

One more thing that occurred to me: if he really likes chasing things, make the treat-giving dynamic. Instead of just placing the treat in his mouth, toss it or slide it across the floor for him to chase. The only time this is a bad idea is if you're trying to train a calm behavior, but for stuff like recall and tricks it can be a great way to amp up the value of your reward and keep your pup engaged.
 

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@Jack Naylor , you can (and often do, I see) write all the long paragraphs you want to but in this case, as in some others, you really are not on the topic.
Comparing to inanimate things is not useful, dictionary definitions are not pertinent, nor are comparisons to human children in this case. As others have said above, your arguments are not valid on this topic of whether or not dogs are actually stubborn. They are not, and calling a dog that only leads to misconceptions, misinterpretations of the dog's behavior, and damage to the dog/person relationship.

This is not just a matter of semantics, but of attitudes that people have or do not have towards their dogs which can be helpful or harmful. Seeing a dog as stubborn is harmful.
 

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Stubborn implies an unwillingness out of spite.

Comparing to inanimate things is not useful, dictionary definitions are not pertinent, nor are comparisons to human children in this case.
Just saying those things doesn't make them true ...reality dicates otherwise.

a) The dictionary definition make no such implication
b) The word is largely accepted by the husky community as is evidenced by 21 million hits
c) Every single example you gave for dogs can, in actual fact, be also be applied to humans so why does the word exist ?

When a family member is sick and asks me for a "Kleenex", I'm going to go get them a tissue; If you want to stand there and argue that every tissue is not a Kleenex be my guest, but your not helping anyone.

As to inanimate things, the fact remains that the entire world uses this vernacular and ignoring it is simply denying reality. We have dictionaries for a reason...so there is no argument as to what the word means...to deny this is, again, ignores reality.

As others have said above, your arguments are not valid on this topic of whether or not dogs are actually stubborn.
As 21 million internet references attest, stubborness is a behavior associated with dogs, specifically huskies. The meaning of words is defined by dictionaries. Husky Owner and rescue groups all use this terminology. You'll find it mentioned in hundreds of youtube videos. When people continue to expend effort in accomplishing a desired result, resistance to achieving that result and describing it as "stubborn" is a universally accepted vernacular. Two people ...200 or 2,000 saying otherwise will not change that. Put 100 husky owners in a room and ask how many of you have observed your dog being stubborn ? Would you bet on the outcome ?

Most understand that cause of the stubborn behavior is independence, lack of motivation and other causes. It's like saying "Dog's aren't Happy" .... we can ask why they are happy ? Anticipation to getting something they want being one of the main causes ... but when people see a dog dancing, spinning in circles, lifting front feet up, vocalizing etc, I wouldn't criticize the description "happy" being used.

If we can't not apply the word stubborn to dogs,then we can't apply it to children either as many of the motivating factors are in fact the same. So if that's the case, why does the word exist ? Why is it used by psychologists ? Why does it not "risk impacting their relationship with the humans around them or their welfare going forward. " ? If it's OK for psychologists, to describe this behavior. Why is it a topic in Psychology today ? The people are PhD's, with state issued licenses after proving adequate education training and experience giving advice to parents for their children ... why shouldn't they be disbarred ?

What I find so interesting is the trend of highly sensitive children to display a high level of stubbornness, are strong-willed and absolutely refuse to do certain things. It is this quality (along with others) that has emerged in these children that isn’t captured by their highly sensitive nature but is something else. What is it? And what do you do?

Stubbornness is considered the “showing dogged determination not to change one’s attitude or position on something,” per dictionary.com. This feels right. What I find emerging in highly sensitive children beyond sensitivity is the energy of defiance. They rely on their inner wisdom, what I call intuitive intelligence, as opposed to outside authorities. In other words, these highly sensitive boys and girls cannot be cajoled by people outside of them – they are inwardly motivated and when they want to do something, they will.

Our highly sensitive children aren’t just sensitive. They are a collective of highly capable, intelligent, gifted, and yes, stubborn beings who were born to do great things. I realize these also aren’t the easiest kids to parent, teach and counsel, but they hold within them the potential to be great. Not just good but truly great. Of course, a lot of this rests on our shoulders and how we nurture their greatness, support their unique gifts and help them channel their stubbornness in productive ways.


Again, she describes the causes of the stubborn behavior in children a manner that parallels similar behaviors in dogs but she stated that the dictionary definition "feels right". Some pyschologists also argue that there's no such thing as stubborness or greed as it's an observation or perception ... as I said an "observed" condition. But f your goal is do overcoming, using the word to define your observation is appropriate in that it defines a course of necessary action. It's like the color "blue" ...why is it called blue ? It's useful for us to agree on what blue means so that when my wife says go out and buy some blue paint, I don;t get my head chewed off when I come how with red

Now here is they key point, which highlights the real world disconnect. If the person who 1st said "Let's call the color of the sky yellow", would that change what the sky looks like ? The word, just like colors, is a "completely made up" description of an "observed behavior". When we observe the color of the sky, we can all agree that it's blue . Society has determined that a certain behavior represents a set of observations ..each behavior is driven by specific desires or emotions. Approximately 34,000 emotions have been described and assigned specific definitions, all in the dictionary most of them subsets of other subsets down to the 8 primary emotions ... every word used to describe them is a word
"completely "made up". When you observe stubborn behavior, the solution is to ascertain the driving force behind the "behavioral display". We don't describe the color of the sky as "The answer to why the sky is blue isn't quite correct. The sky is blue not because the atmosphere absorbs the other colors, but because the atmosphere tends to scatter shorter wavelength (blue) ......[yada yade 400 more words]".

======================================
I don't need to be lectured on why the sky is blue when the wife asks me to go out and buy blue paint, I observed the color and "blue"and that gives me all I need to know. I also don't need a dissertation on canine motivations when an owner describes a dog or breed as "stubborn", I know exactly what he / she means because I have observed this behavior as has any experienced Husky owner, breeder or rescue group and there is a wide consensus. When a breeder or rescue owner is evaluating a prospective dog owner, it's important for the perspective owner to be prepared and understand that to successfully rear and train this dog, despite experience with other more anxious to please dogs (like Labs), they are going to have to display a different demeanor and take a more diligent approach to training. That is the message that needs to be conveyed and that's why the pairing of husky and stubborn gets 21million hits.
=====================================

I'm fine with people having different opinions, even when there is a preponderance of acceptance out in the world to one side versus the other another. In closing my part in this discussion to any lurker I'll say "Hey don't listen to me, I'm just a random dude you found on the internet. Do your own research ...." Here's a few places to start, but pick any sources ya want and draw your own conclusions.

-Word meanings ==>Dictionaries
-Husky Behaviors ==> Husky Owners,Organizations and rescue groups
-Use of stubborn for inanimate Objects ==>Real life
-Use of stubborn for inanimate Objects ==> Dictionary:
"unreasonably obstinate; obstinately unmoving"
"difficult to remove, deal with, or use "
 

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Okay, the links to topics totally unrelated to the thread topic is getting out of hand, I'm deleting the worst offenders. Please only link articles that are actually relevant to the topics being discussed.
 

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Just saying those things doesn't make them true ...reality dicates otherwise.

a) The dictionary definition make no such implication
b) The word is largely accepted by the husky community as is evidenced by 21 million hits
c) Every single example you gave for dogs can, in actual fact, be also be applied to humans so why does the word exist ?

When a family member is sick and asks me for a "Kleenex", I'm going to go get them a tissue; If you want to stand there and argue that every tissue is not a Kleenex be my guest, but your not helping anyone.

As to inanimate things, the fact remains that the entire world uses this vernacular and ignoring it is simply denying reality. We have dictionaries for a reason...so there is no argument as to what the word means...to deny this is, again, ignores reality.



As 21 million internet references attest, stubborness is a behavior associated with dogs, specifically huskies. The meaning of words is defined by dictionaries. Husky Owner and rescue groups all use this terminology. You'll find it mentioned in hundreds of youtube videos. When people continue to expend effort in accomplishing a desired result, resistance to achieving that result and describing it as "stubborn" is a universally accepted vernacular. Two people ...200 or 2,000 saying otherwise will not change that. Put 100 husky owners in a room and ask how many of you have observed your dog being stubborn ? Would you bet on the outcome ?

Most understand that cause of the stubborn behavior is independence, lack of motivation and other causes. It's like saying "Dog's aren't Happy" .... we can ask why they are happy ? Anticipation to getting something they want being one of the main causes ... but when people see a dog dancing, spinning in circles, lifting front feet up, vocalizing etc, I wouldn't criticize the description "happy" being used.

If we can't not apply the word stubborn to dogs,then we can't apply it to children either as many of the motivating factors are in fact the same. So if that's the case, why does the word exist ? Why is it used by psychologists ? Why does it not "risk impacting their relationship with the humans around them or their welfare going forward. " ? If it's OK for psychologists, to describe this behavior. Why is it a topic in Psychology today ? The people are PhD's, with state issued licenses after proving adequate education training and experience giving advice to parents for their children ... why shouldn't they be disbarred ?

What I find so interesting is the trend of highly sensitive children to display a high level of stubbornness, are strong-willed and absolutely refuse to do certain things. It is this quality (along with others) that has emerged in these children that isn’t captured by their highly sensitive nature but is something else. What is it? And what do you do?

Stubbornness is considered the “showing dogged determination not to change one’s attitude or position on something,” per dictionary.com. This feels right. What I find emerging in highly sensitive children beyond sensitivity is the energy of defiance. They rely on their inner wisdom, what I call intuitive intelligence, as opposed to outside authorities. In other words, these highly sensitive boys and girls cannot be cajoled by people outside of them – they are inwardly motivated and when they want to do something, they will.

Our highly sensitive children aren’t just sensitive. They are a collective of highly capable, intelligent, gifted, and yes, stubborn beings who were born to do great things. I realize these also aren’t the easiest kids to parent, teach and counsel, but they hold within them the potential to be great. Not just good but truly great. Of course, a lot of this rests on our shoulders and how we nurture their greatness, support their unique gifts and help them channel their stubbornness in productive ways.


Again, she describes the causes of the stubborn behavior in children a manner that parallels similar behaviors in dogs but she stated that the dictionary definition "feels right". Some pyschologists also argue that there's no such thing as stubborness or greed as it's an observation or perception ... as I said an "observed" condition. But f your goal is do overcoming, using the word to define your observation is appropriate in that it defines a course of necessary action. It's like the color "blue" ...why is it called blue ? It's useful for us to agree on what blue means so that when my wife says go out and buy some blue paint, I don;t get my head chewed off when I come how with red

Now here is they key point, which highlights the real world disconnect. If the person who 1st said "Let's call the color of the sky yellow", would that change what the sky looks like ? The word, just like colors, is a "completely made up" description of an "observed behavior". When we observe the color of the sky, we can all agree that it's blue . Society has determined that a certain behavior represents a set of observations ..each behavior is driven by specific desires or emotions. Approximately 34,000 emotions have been described and assigned specific definitions, all in the dictionary most of them subsets of other subsets down to the 8 primary emotions ... every word used to describe them is a word
"completely "made up". When you observe stubborn behavior, the solution is to ascertain the driving force behind the "behavioral display". We don't describe the color of the sky as "The answer to why the sky is blue isn't quite correct. The sky is blue not because the atmosphere absorbs the other colors, but because the atmosphere tends to scatter shorter wavelength (blue) ......[yada yade 400 more words]".

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I don't need to be lectured on why the sky is blue when the wife asks me to go out and buy blue paint, I observed the color and "blue"and that gives me all I need to know. I also don't need a dissertation on canine motivations when an owner describes a dog or breed as "stubborn", I know exactly what he / she means because I have observed this behavior as has any experienced Husky owner, breeder or rescue group and there is a wide consensus. When a breeder or rescue owner is evaluating a prospective dog owner, it's important for the perspective owner to be prepared and understand that to successfully rear and train this dog, despite experience with other more anxious to please dogs (like Labs), they are going to have to display a different demeanor and take a more diligent approach to training. That is the message that needs to be conveyed and that's why the pairing of husky and stubborn gets 21million hits.
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I'm fine with people having different opinions, even when there is a preponderance of acceptance out in the world to one side versus the other another. In closing my part in this discussion to any lurker I'll say "Hey don't listen to me, I'm just a random dude you found on the internet. Do your own research ...." Here's a few places to start, but pick any sources ya want and draw your own conclusions.

-Word meanings ==>Dictionaries
-Husky Behaviors ==> Husky Owners,Organizations and rescue groups
-Use of stubborn for inanimate Objects ==>Real life
-Use of stubborn for inanimate Objects ==> Dictionary:
"unreasonably obstinate; obstinately unmoving"
"difficult to remove, deal with, or use "
Jack, I have to wonder how many people actually read all these lengthy and long winded posts that you keep putting up that wander off topic and around to other things that are not pertinent to the subject being discussed. Maybe if you want to write essays it would be good to do that in a place where people are more interested in convoluted and long winded paragraphs and debates....and there are definitely such places.

Clearly, you like to write, which is great. And you are not a bad writer, either. I like to write too. But I have to wonder.... maybe here isn't the best audience for you. Most people probably don't have time or inclination to read an essay.

Shorter responses that are to the point are more effective on the internet where people are looking for answers to questions or problems, I think. Most are not looking to read someone's debate with multiple references on a dog forum. We are only talking about dogs here. Not philosophy or semantics or why the sky is blue. Just a thought. (and please, please, don't write another essay in response!)
 
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