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I'm currently dealing with some reactivity issues with my dog to people and to be honest sometimes it gets lonely and feels like an uphill struggle sometimes.

so I thought I could create a thread where we can all share our reactive dog success stories, whether it's a dog that is fully reliable around it's trigger now or even you walked past a dog without your dog lunging today! Anything goes as long as it's (mostly) positive just to egg us all on and show us some hope for our dogs to keep us going!

Feel free to add as little or as much info as you want, from how the reactivity was caused, what methods/toys/treats etc you found super useful. Useful links or guides.

My dog is reactive to people, it started with a child that spooked him while he was sleeping, he then reacted to her by growling and lunging at her but we made a ton of progress by her building a relationship with her by feeding him treats, actually interacting with him etc.

He then went to the vets with an inner ear infection, vet touched and he immediately went for a warning snap and had to be muzzled so he could look and from then on he's been reactive to anyone who walks towards him he doesn't know.

We then stupidly had a camping trip to the Lake District in the middle of summer and he had to come with, stupid me thought I could use this as a training opportunity with all the people there but as I found out when I finally got back and consulted a positive trainer, trigger stacking is a thing so that didn't go hugely well.

Now I've been to a positive trainer and got a load of resources/methods and a plan to move forward so hopefully we can get this sorted. He's 17 months and the trainer has high hopes he's just going through a fear period and will come out the other side fine because I was "switched on" to dog training as she put it. Hoping that's the case but for now we're working on building engagement with me so he can ignore triggers, doing some BAT, muzzle training and just avoiding any negative experiences with people, , so far so good.

I work at an indoor dog park on Sundays so hopefully one day he'll be all clear to come to work with me, that's always been one of my dreams!

Today we worked about 10 feet from some people and engagement and reaction were all neutral to positive so that's wicked.

Hope I can learn some cool tips or some science based stuff from this thread!
 

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Hi thanks for starting this thread!

Barclay is reactive to other dogs. He will bark repetitively and lunge, and his eyes roll in his head- frankly he looks crazy and he has a headache-inducing bark. He probably has a reputation in our neighborhood, as some of my neighbors with dogs will turn around or walk in a different direction when they see us, lol. However, he is a small dog (17 pounds) so I know his reactivity is not comparable to reactivity in larger dogs.

Now the goods news- one of my neighbors approached me a while back and said "He's improving!" What I did was use "look at me" and treat. The key for me is to be able to see the other dog either before or at the same time as Barclay, and then quickly "look at me" and treat. That usually redirects him, because he is food motivated. If it is a dog that really sets him off-in my apartment one of his main enemies is a female pug- I continue to treat, and sometimes ask for a sit and treat.

This requires me always having treats in my pocket, and quick reflexess. If a dog catches us by surprise, all bets are off, and I have to either walk him quickly away or I will lift him up and turn around.

Walking my two-year old terriers together can be a trial and embarrasing, but some things I just have to let go. I am also sure that things will continue to improve over time. Btw, I have had Barclay for 6 months.
 

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Molly started with the reactivity between 5 and 6 months - it just grew out of a fear stage and a negative experience. Lunging, barking, growling, just sounding like cujo. We put her in her agility foundations class just before 8 months, anyway, though at first she had to stay behind a couple of barriers to block the site of other dogs. I have definitely left classes in tears. We repeated that class, and then took beginner and are now halfway through intermediate. She's now almost 16 months old and has been in group classes for half her life.

She's better. Not perfect, for sure, and still a struggle, but better. Look at that didn't work for her, because she's prone to 'freezing' and fixating on things, anyway. She was already crazy obsessed with other dogs, LAT just made it worse. Look at ME was asking her to take her attention off something scary and do nothing, and she'd do it but it didn't really take her mind off what was going on. What actually worked was asking for her to look at me and then engaging her in play or training so that her brain was put on something else.

A vest/harness that has patches with a stop sign and patches on the sides that say 'no touch, no talk, no eye-contact' helped, too, since she can kind of wig out at people here and there - especially when they're too forward or direct. It also tends to ensure people with other dogs keep some distance from her.

We've come along way. I no longer have any fear of her going after anyone, or any dog. She WILL stay with me and work, even in very distracting environments. Her work is sometimes pretty crappy compared to home, but she won't leave me to start trouble. Even when that distracting environment is an agility field with a dog on the next course and a bunch of livestock around the edges and other people and dogs waiting in the wings. The more exposure she has, the better she is.

My biggest issue at this point is probably just that she embarrasses the heck out of me, and fear of what's going to happen when we run out of classes to take with her. She's not ready to compete, really, but I'm not ready to let her stop being exposed to a bunch of other dogs being crazy because at this stage of the game it's HELPING keeping her threshold really, really high and frankly I don't want to lose that.

ETA: That said, as Patricia said, I'm big on protecting the dog. No one pets Molly. Dogs don't approach Molly. The key to her being comfortable and getting comfortable is that she knows she isn't going to have to interact with those things. that said, ain't no way I"m keeping her away from people, dogs and the public. All that does is turn the people, dogs, and the public into a bigger, scarier deal. At least if her behavior is anything to go by, and frankly even if I wanted to leave her home all the time, I couldn't. Dealing with other dogs, people and public spaces are unavoidable in most dog's lives. Besides, she'd find life at home and in isolated areas pretty... well, limiting and sad.

There's a line, basically, for me. You keep your dog safe, you build confidence, you keep the public safe, you prioritize the dog's comfort over good manners, but you don't just give up on the dog or enable fear and bad behavior, either.
 

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Darien was abused to the point of torture and broken bones, him being HA was understandable and it didn't bother me. No sense in taking him places out into the world to learn to feel safe, if they were not places that he could feel safe. Last thing in the world for him would of been to keep torturing him about strangers / people... took some thought finding places to have fun and explore for the two of us to bond, that going a the right time for us was pretty much void of people and other dogs. That was the most successful start. The way to keep Darien safe in public situations was not changing his mind about people, it was about strong OB skills. strong team skills. That allowed us to maneuver in and through public situations when we needed to. He was a (Rules) dog... That is what gave him confidence.. Life has rules and everyone follows the rules ,, Mom, will step up and make them (people) follow the rules.. Always let Darien keep his voice, always let him put terror and fear into people who didn't play by the rules, kept our humor between us about rude humans,,( we had a grading scale of 1 - 10.. 10 being the scariest affect on people Darien could earn with his antics) it was just between us, it kept it light hearted working together, no stress or fustraction from me to him.. I had his back and he knew it... (never let other people make us feel embarrassed or if there was something wrong with Darien) Skating through real life with majority of humans following the rules, ( Darien does not ever have to interact with people) ( and people do not interact with Darien he is off limits) Darien learned tolerance in public situations and that tolerance really helped around stupid people who didn't want to follow the rules. Darien gave the time to redirect humans who slipped by or been more tricky to sneak up on us and go straight for him.. Main thing is that Darien learned to trust me and interact with me that I had his back always.. Darien was sharp in OB skills down to perfection , he enjoy'd being good at it. we could maneuver any situation in a very structure way and that was what he could focus on and stay strong to task.... Never have to be distracted for worring or anticipate having to meet people, be touched by people, or confronted by people.. he could focus on staying on task, keeping a tight heel while walking, or sitting while I engaged with other humans. I always thought of Darien first, I always kept him safe from the one thing that he didn't like. I always knew the path we were to take to lead him for him to know it was safe to follow into tight situations, set appointments at the quiet times , end of day last dog to the vet clinic or in the back door when it was busy.. And he grew tolerant confident and secure..

There was so much more to learn and be excellent at, that had nothing to do with other people and dogs in his younger years.. I am totally against confronting a dog over and over again with the things they can't do and traumatizing them over and over again and expecting different results ... then being surprised that it's worse. I am all for starting with stopping the madness completely for them, and teaching them life is great in all other ways, and how to interact in the world without being confronted by what concerns them.

Awesome dog (if you knew how to play ball "you were in) lol .... have their back, don't feel the need to choose the public over your dog.... :) :) :)
 

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My male dog is reactive to almost any other male dog. My solution, preferably before it starts, is to pick him up and carry him past the other male. Not a perfect fix, but it sure has made walks more peaceful. Sometimes I have to orient his line of sight away from the other dog while passing, sometimes not. Even though he always looks like he's spoiling for a fight, it must in fact be fear, because the "flyover" seems to make him feel safe. As he is 17kg, it's doable but I'm glad I don't usually have to carry him too far. In these moments I'm glad he is not a Saint Bernard. :- )
 

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I would call Watson mildly reactive I guess. He's not a reactive dog in general, in that he isn't hyper alert to different stuff really. He's just very interested in dogs. If it's a busy area with lots of dogs and people he's pretty chill, and he's learned to relax in classes. But if one dog is approaching in a quiet area (like our local trail in the off season) he will look, and stare, and look some more, and sometimes bark once they dog is directly across the trail from us (about 20ft).

Lately he's gotten so much better and is ignoring most dogs on walks now. I use bring treats, and I do say "leave it" if I have to, but one some walks he's looked to me without a prompt, or just sniffed the ground and ignored the dog. There are specific dogs (intact males) or types of dogs (super reactive ones or GSDs) who he struggles with, but he has gotten a lot better. I think his problem is mostly excitement frustration which he's getting under control. The times he's insecure (like around intact males) is much harder and he often completely ignores me and reacts, but luckily we rarely see these specific intact males who he has a hard time with.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Darien was abused to the point of torture and broken bones, him being HA was understandable and it didn't bother me. No sense in taking him places out into the world to learn to feel safe, if they were not places that he could feel safe. Last thing in the world for him would of been to keep torturing him about strangers / people... took some thought finding places to have fun and explore for the two of us to bond, that going a the right time for us was pretty much void of people and other dogs. That was the most successful start. The way to keep Darien safe in public situations was not changing his mind about people, it was about strong OB skills. strong team skills. That allowed us to maneuver in and through public situations when we needed to. He was a (Rules) dog... That is what gave him confidence.. Life has rules and everyone follows the rules ,, Mom, will step up and make them (people) follow the rules.. Always let Darien keep his voice, always let him put terror and fear into people who didn't play by the rules, kept our humor between us about rude humans,,( we had a grading scale of 1 - 10.. 10 being the scariest affect on people Darien could earn with his antics) it was just between us, it kept it light hearted working together, no stress or fustraction from me to him.. I had his back and he knew it... (never let other people make us feel embarrassed or if there was something wrong with Darien) Skating through real life with majority of humans following the rules, ( Darien does not ever have to interact with people) ( and people do not interact with Darien he is off limits) Darien learned tolerance in public situations and that tolerance really helped around stupid people who didn't want to follow the rules. Darien gave the time to redirect humans who slipped by or been more tricky to sneak up on us and go straight for him.. Main thing is that Darien learned to trust me and interact with me that I had his back always.. Darien was sharp in OB skills down to perfection , he enjoy'd being good at it. we could maneuver any situation in a very structure way and that was what he could focus on and stay strong to task.... Never have to be distracted for worring or anticipate having to meet people, be touched by people, or confronted by people.. he could focus on staying on task, keeping a tight heel while walking, or sitting while I engaged with other humans. I always thought of Darien first, I always kept him safe from the one thing that he didn't like. I always knew the path we were to take to lead him for him to know it was safe to follow into tight situations, set appointments at the quiet times , end of day last dog to the vet clinic or in the back door when it was busy.. And he grew tolerant confident and secure..

There was so much more to learn and be excellent at, that had nothing to do with other people and dogs in his younger years.. I am totally against confronting a dog over and over again with the things they can't do and traumatizing them over and over again and expecting different results ... then being surprised that it's worse. I am all for starting with stopping the madness completely for them, and teaching them life is great in all other ways, and how to interact in the world without being confronted by what concerns them.

Awesome dog (if you knew how to play ball "you were in) lol .... have their back, don't feel the need to choose the public over your dog.... :) :) :)
I think considering his circumstances that it's fair enough to not allow human interaction! So sad to hear. I think it depends on the dog and how badly their experience with the trigger is. My dog is people reactive but he's improving surprisingly quickly actually and not reacting very often at the minute. I think if his reaction was consistent and no improvement I wouldn't hesitate to stop keep challenging his fear but at the minute I think we are able to undo some of the damage that has been done.

My male dog is reactive to almost any other male dog. My solution, preferably before it starts, is to pick him up and carry him past the other male. Not a perfect fix, but it sure has made walks more peaceful. Sometimes I have to orient his line of sight away from the other dog while passing, sometimes not. Even though he always looks like he's spoiling for a fight, it must in fact be fear, because the "flyover" seems to make him feel safe. As he is 17kg, it's doable but I'm glad I don't usually have to carry him too far. In these moments I'm glad he is not a Saint Bernard. :- )
I find it so weird when does are reactive to such a specific... Like why does having balls matter to the dog at all???? Have most of the entire dogs he's met the type to be over threshold and get quite rough/humpy? or has he met calm ones too and they bother him aswell?

I would call Watson mildly reactive I guess. He's not a reactive dog in general, in that he isn't hyper alert to different stuff really. He's just very interested in dogs. If it's a busy area with lots of dogs and people he's pretty chill, and he's learned to relax in classes. But if one dog is approaching in a quiet area (like our local trail in the off season) he will look, and stare, and look some more, and sometimes bark once they dog is directly across the trail from us (about 20ft).

Lately he's gotten so much better and is ignoring most dogs on walks now. I use bring treats, and I do say "leave it" if I have to, but one some walks he's looked to me without a prompt, or just sniffed the ground and ignored the dog. There are specific dogs (intact males) or types of dogs (super reactive ones or GSDs) who he struggles with, but he has gotten a lot better. I think his problem is mostly excitement frustration which he's getting under control. The times he's insecure (like around intact males) is much harder and he often completely ignores me and reacts, but luckily we rarely see these specific intact males who he has a hard time with.
Ugh Chilli is the same, he's very quick to get aroused around dogs, if he's in a large group of them like on a viz whizz he rarely engages them and stays close to me (actually the only time he's ok with large groups of people, like he will literally go up to them and take treats and everything, even new people???) but one to one he's very much a rough house lunatic and if he's on lead or has a barrier between the two he'll get really frustrated and end up barking/lunging.

Again, what is it about entire males that freak him out or is it just one of those things? Is he entire too?


Well today we did some LAT/BAT and it went really well, people passed a few feet away on the other side of a park gate and he lay in the relaxed side pose and kept focus on me. Only time he reacted was when someone started up a power tool and then again when someone pulled up in a car real fast with loud music, both times he did a single "gruff" and then focused on me again.

I'm using a mix of rewarding when he's looking at the trigger and then distraction/focus on me with tugs or food rewards. He seems to be really fast at adapting, like he's fine with his muzzle going on and getting treats through the gap after like 2 quick sessions and his reactions to people have reduced a lot.... Starting to think it's just a fear period and he's going to come out of the other side thinking wtf... maybe I'm just being optimistic though!

Edit:

Something else I wanted to discuss is getting another dog with a reactive dog. You guys all seem to have multiple dogs... I really want another dog at some point but my brother pointed out it was necessarily a good idea because the new dog might feed off the energy or learn from the other dog. Is this the case? Would it depend on the temperament of the new dog, if I trained them separately etc aswell would the other dog likely end up with reaction issues?

I'd love a Klee Kai ultimately but I know they're naturally fairly wary of people so not sure it'd be the greatest choice in my current dogs life time.
 

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Sassy was very reactive to other dogs and I didn't have good tools for handling it at that point. Getting another dog just made a pack that was more reactive. On his own Max was fine with other dogs, with Sassy they formed a pack that chased other dogs in rude play [at dog park, not the neighborhood!]. Good thing was I did get some tools and it got better but just having another dog isn't likely to help. Get another dog because you are up to double the fun and work, not to help with some issue your dog has.

Ginger screamed that she would die unless she got to meet other dogs when I got her, with the aid of a lot of string cheese she now mutters under her breath so back yard dogs will bark at her so she gets a bit of cheese when she looks at me instead of barking back. Working it she is!

Max barked in terror at scary people the day after we got him and by the time he left us at 14 years of age he could calmly walk by people but still had trouble if they looked or talked to him. I developed my own version of 'look at me' where I c/t continuously until trigger passed by. On his own he started looking at me and I was able to slow down the c/t to just praise and a cookie over several months. I did need to carry treats for his whole life, this never went away.

Bucky has been here a month and just starting to show his complete awfulness. He adores being rude to other dogs [jumps on backs if at dog park/barks if restrained on leash], afraid of people [barks if leashed, approaches and sniffs at dog park], loses his brain when there are good smells or in new places. Good thing he likes me, is the cutest thing playing with his toys, very trainable, food motivated unless his brain is gone and looks adorable. Oh, a little guy so his worst charges can be held with a single finger in the leash loop. He is more like Sassy than like Ginger or Max, hoping he will end up the great partner Sassy was in a couple years.
 

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Sassy was very reactive to other dogs and I didn't have good tools for handling it at that point. Getting another dog just made a pack that was more reactive. On his own Max was fine with other dogs, with Sassy they formed a pack that chased other dogs in rude play [at dog park, not the neighborhood!]. Good thing was I did get some tools and it got better but just having another dog isn't likely to help. Get another dog because you are up to double the fun and work, not to help with some issue your dog has.

Ginger screamed that she would die unless she got to meet other dogs when I got her, with the aid of a lot of string cheese she now mutters under her breath so back yard dogs will bark at her so she gets a bit of cheese when she looks at me instead of barking back. Working it she is!

Max barked in terror at scary people the day after we got him and by the time he left us at 14 years of age he could calmly walk by people but still had trouble if they looked or talked to him. I developed my own version of 'look at me' where I c/t continuously until trigger passed by. On his own he started looking at me and I was able to slow down the c/t to just praise and a cookie over several months. I did need to carry treats for his whole life, this never went away.

Bucky has been here a month and just starting to show his complete awfulness. He adores being rude to other dogs [jumps on backs if at dog park/barks if restrained on leash], afraid of people [barks if leashed, approaches and sniffs at dog park], loses his brain when there are good smells or in new places. Good thing he likes me, is the cutest thing playing with his toys, very trainable, food motivated unless his brain is gone and looks adorable. Oh, a little guy so his worst charges can be held with a single finger in the leash loop. He is more like Sassy than like Ginger or Max, hoping he will end up the great partner Sassy was in a couple years.
Oh I'd never get a dog to fix another dog's issues. That's something I'm working on in a 1 to 1 situation, I already have a springer spaniel living with us which is my mum's dog but she only comes when we're going to our 'secret place' where my dog is allowed off leash because we can see from all angles easily and it's rare to see someone there so I don't need to manage him so it's fine to have the both of them.

The main reason I want another dog is because the SS doesn't play with other dogs so my dog really winds her up a treat and I'd like to take the pressure off her and have a dog mine can really rip around with, also so many breeds I want!

I think people who rescue/rehab reactive dogs are literally heroes, I don't think I'd be able to do it through my whole life!
 

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Reactivity is normal otherwise you'd be pulling a stuffed animal behind you on walks. It is the degree that is the issue. We'd all love dogs that see dogs/humans/cars/cats/rabbits/squirrels/burritos and just note the presence of such and look away. Sassy saw new things each and every time we took a walk for a good YEAR after we got her. Every sprinkler head, bit of trash, weed was reacted to. The sawhorse across the sidewalk repair was there for a month, we went by it daily and she had to renew her acquaintance with it every single day. She probably treated all those objects as new to her if other members of the family walked her as well. She was no generalizer that was for darn sure!

Early days, I am hoping that Ginger's wonderfulness rubs off on Bucky as in I hope my dog handling skills are part of her being so wonderful.
 

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I find it so weird when does are reactive to such a specific... Like why does having balls matter to the dog at all???? Have most of the entire dogs he's met the type to be over threshold and get quite rough/humpy? or has he met calm ones too and they bother him aswell?

Again, what is it about entire males that freak him out or is it just one of those things? Is he entire too?
Yes, Watson is also intact, which is probably part of his problem. I think intact males tend to be pretty "doggie" sometimes - very interested in other dog and what they are doing. I don't think that necessarily makes them reactive, but it can easily lead to frustration when the only thing they want to do is check out that other dog, but they have a leash on and can't do it. I'm pretty sure that is the bulk of Watson's issue since, like I said, he's not a reactive dog in the general sense (towards noises, people, etc).

As far as not liking intact males, a lot of neutered males also hate intact males, though I have had people (like a behaviorist) suggest that neutering him might make him better with other intact males. So I'm not sure. But I have had neutered dogs react aggressively to him because he's intact (according to the owners).

Something else I wanted to discuss is getting another dog with a reactive dog. You guys all seem to have multiple dogs... I really want another dog at some point but my brother pointed out it was necessarily a good idea because the new dog might feed off the energy or learn from the other dog. Is this the case? Would it depend on the temperament of the new dog, if I trained them separately etc aswell would the other dog likely end up with reaction issues?
I think it really depends. I was worried about my puppy becoming reactive by being around Watson when he reacts. Luckily she has very rarely seen him react (a combination of him being pretty good now, plus doing a lot of walking them separately still). And I don't think she's a reactive type. She is interested in dogs but ultimately doesn't care that much about them. I don't see her getting insecure or excited/frustrated in the future.

Our friends have a super reactive dog, and he is calmer when walking with Watson. This was mostly when Watson was not reactive (when he was around a year old). But having that other calmer dog was helpful to him. Watson on the other hand doesn't seem to derive any help from Hazel walking with him.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Reactivity is normal otherwise you'd be pulling a stuffed animal behind you on walks. It is the degree that is the issue. We'd all love dogs that see dogs/humans/cars/cats/rabbits/squirrels/burritos and just note the presence of such and look away. Sassy saw new things each and every time we took a walk for a good YEAR after we got her. Every sprinkler head, bit of trash, weed was reacted to. The sawhorse across the sidewalk repair was there for a month, we went by it daily and she had to renew her acquaintance with it every single day. She probably treated all those objects as new to her if other members of the family walked her as well. She was no generalizer that was for darn sure!

Early days, I am hoping that Ginger's wonderfulness rubs off on Bucky as in I hope my dog handling skills are part of her being so wonderful.
Ye obviously but I'm talking long term reactive issues, I really admire anyone purposely taking on those kinds of dogs and managing them or "fixing" them.

On a more funny side I was so embarrassed earlier, I was walking in a field with sheep and came across an owner with two border collies, both playing fetch and completely ignoring the sheep and then there's my gundog trying to get at them and chase them... I felt shown up but ofcourse not all BCs want to herd sheep so maybe the owner was just lucky, made me laugh though :p

edit:

Yes, Watson is also intact, which is probably part of his problem. I think intact males tend to be pretty "doggie" sometimes - very interested in other dog and what they are doing. I don't think that necessarily makes them reactive, but it can easily lead to frustration when the only thing they want to do is check out that other dog, but they have a leash on and can't do it. I'm pretty sure that is the bulk of Watson's issue since, like I said, he's not a reactive dog in the general sense (towards noises, people, etc).

As far as not liking intact males, a lot of neutered males also hate intact males, though I have had people (like a behaviorist) suggest that neutering him might make him better with other intact males. So I'm not sure. But I have had neutered dogs react aggressively to him because he's intact (according to the owners).



I think it really depends. I was worried about my puppy becoming reactive by being around Watson when he reacts. Luckily she has very rarely seen him react (a combination of him being pretty good now, plus doing a lot of walking them separately still). And I don't think she's a reactive type. She is interested in dogs but ultimately doesn't care that much about them. I don't see her getting insecure or excited/frustrated in the future.

Our friends have a super reactive dog, and he is calmer when walking with Watson. This was mostly when Watson was not reactive (when he was around a year old). But having that other calmer dog was helpful to him. Watson on the other hand doesn't seem to derive any help from Hazel walking with him.
I've heard all sorts about intact/neutered dogs. From people saying neutered dogs smell like bitches/in season, dogs who hate intact dogs, dogs who are hated by another dog for being intact etc. I never know which is true, I go on Viz whizzes where there's sometimes 15+ dogs and about 80% of the boys are entire and the only one who has real issues with other dogs is one who is used for stud. The others get on well and the biggest problem is humping from over excitement usually. Obviously that doesn't prove anything about the relationship between entire hating dogs, I just don't understand why really and have never met one who particularly goes for an entire dog that doesn't go for a neutered one but I'm in a small part of the world. I guess it's very possible, I mean I know of dogs who hate certain breeds so being intact and being able to sense hormones seems very realistic I guess.
 

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Ye obviously but I'm talking long term reactive issues, I really admire anyone purposely taking on those kinds of dogs and managing them or "fixing" them.

On a more funny side I was so embarrassed earlier, I was walking in a field with sheep and came across an owner with two border collies, both playing fetch and completely ignoring the sheep and then there's my gundog trying to get at them and chase them... I felt shown up but ofcourse not all BCs want to herd sheep so maybe the owner was just lucky, made me laugh though :p
The bigger the animal, the more my "bird dog" loses his mind. He thinks deer are the most exciting thing ever, and the few times he's seen larger livestock he has lost his mind. Small song birds barely register for him though. I call him my big game hunter. lol
 

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gingerwrinklepup Darien grew up just fine letting go on his own, several people threw themselves on him in public places , one even kissing him all over his face and he just let it be in the moment. Never forget how un-expecting peoples behaviors can be when they see a dog out in public. Play a simple toss and catch game of ball was an ice breaker for him.. "if you play ball then you must be a good person" it was Dariens universal language that he could understand so I did exploit it.. He passed several years ago was my heart dog for sure. long live never laid a mouth on anyone... did send many running for their lives, he always kept that humorous side of him to be a prankster at heart here and there .. My favorite one was Darien and Major in the back of the truck coming home from a show we stopped at KFC. Was about to walk in and saw a vehicle pull in right next to the truck. And could only see the tips of their GSD ears as the man got out of his truck had his back turned to my camper shell , just enough room to open and shut his door and start walking away.. Darien and Major let the man pass by the camper side window then Darien jumped up and he and Major started roaring at the man.. Man took off running across the parking lot as if he thought the dogs were right behind him.. It was so sneaky terrible of my two to that poor man... lol I secretly gave them a perfect 10 for how frightened the guy was and how fast he had run away until he finally stopped to realize the dogs were in the truck and not loose chasing him.... Miss you Darien, miss you so much for how much you loved life........

They area all worth the time to keep them safe and help them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
gingerwrinklepup Darien grew up just fine letting go on his own, several people threw themselves on him in public places , one even kissing him all over his face and he just let it be in the moment. Never forget how un-expecting peoples behaviors can be when they see a dog out in public. Play a simple toss and catch game of ball was an ice breaker for him.. "if you play ball then you must be a good person" it was Dariens universal language that he could understand so I did exploit it.. He passed several years ago was my heart dog for sure. long live never laid a mouth on anyone... did send many running for their lives, he always kept that humorous side of him to be a prankster at heart here and there .. My favorite one was Darien and Major in the back of the truck coming home from a show we stopped at KFC. Was about to walk in and saw a vehicle pull in right next to the truck. And could only see the tips of their GSD ears as the man got out of his truck had his back turned to my camper shell , just enough room to open and shut his door and start walking away.. Darien and Major let the man pass by the camper side window then Darien jumped up and he and Major started roaring at the man.. Man took off running across the parking lot as if he thought the dogs were right behind him.. It was so sneaky terrible of my two to that poor man... lol I secretly gave them a perfect 10 for how frightened the guy was and how fast he had run away until he finally stopped to realize the dogs were in the truck and not loose chasing him.... Miss you Darien, miss you so much for how much you loved life........

They area all worth the time to keep them safe and help them.
LOL excellent.
We're moving at the minute so we have a skip to dispose of things, people keep trying to rummage through and it's hilarious how fast they decide not to when Chilli barks at them.
One women was looking through it at 1am the other night, god knows why but Chilli noticed and lets just say she could of won a power walking award... Their reactivity does give us moments of laughter :D
 

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Yeah, my dogs haven't learned reactivity from each other. Kylie, however, will get seriously TICKED and snapped Molly in the face if they're together and she reacts. It isn't Kylie redirecting, it's Kylie correcting Molly. Kind of not the best thing ever, but possibly not the worst, either.

That's about as far as it's gotten, though. She's the youngest, though, so might be different if she were showing other dogs the ropes instead of other way around. Maybe.
 

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Kairi started being excitement reactive to other dogs when she was about 4 months old. It was during puppy classes I noticed that she started to bark when the other dogs were getting all amped up, or if it was there "turn" to work on something and not Kairi's. Once puppy class was over, I made the huge mistakes of taking a break. I came back to obedience after about a month and a half and she was definitely much worse. I didn't get any practice with her though since there was only 1 other dog in my class. I started agility foundation classes when Kairi was about 11 months. She was insanely horrible.. barking/pulling toward dogs every time they got amped up, or took their turn. Agility classes were very difficult handling a reactive dog and trying to learn handling myself. Fast forward one year and she is still reactive to dogs on the course... however.. she is not difficult to handle like she was before. She redirects back to me quickly and ignores them 90% of the time. She has seriously come a long way and I am definitely ready to take on more reactive dogs if need-be! :)

One thing I've definitely learned about reactive behavior is that it is not always aggressive. It is often just pent up frustration and caused by barriers most of the time. Kairi is actually extremely dog friendly despite how she sounds.

Ember has not learned to be reactive from Kairi, thank goodness.
 

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Yeah. I should really say Molly's about as interested in attacking another dog as she is in doing the polka. She's sometimes over excited and frustrated, sometimes fearful, her play with other dogs can be hugely inappropriate and obnoxious, but she isn't at all aggressive. Just... loud.
 

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Nova is reactive towards strangers. If they so much as make eye contact with her, she will defensively bark at them. Sometimes there is also lunging. Her reactivity seems to become a lot worse when SO is away for long periods of time. When he is home, she is still fearful but rarely reacts (maybe an episode once a month). It's really odd, but I know she misses him a lot when he's away. Her GI tract even gets all upset when he's away.

She is also reactive when strangers or people she isn't super familiar with come to the house. This is a constant, whether SO is gone or not, so she has to be in her crate or in another room on the odd occasion a stranger visits.

We have done LAT along with management. She gets SJW to help her get through SO being away, which really seems to help reduce her stress. She is doing right fabulous now. You wouldn't even guess that she is reactive...timid? Yes. But not reactive. I don't know what she will be like when SO goes away again, though. We will see, and I will do my best to help her get through it if she needs it.

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Discussion Starter #20
Nova is reactive towards strangers. If they so much as make eye contact with her, she will defensively bark at them. Sometimes there is also lunging. Her reactivity seems to become a lot worse when SO is away for long periods of time. When he is home, she is still fearful but rarely reacts (maybe an episode once a month). It's really odd, but I know she misses him a lot when he's away. Her GI tract even gets all upset when he's away.

She is also reactive when strangers or people she isn't super familiar with come to the house. This is a constant, whether SO is gone or not, so she has to be in her crate or in another room on the odd occasion a stranger visits.

We have done LAT along with management. She gets SJW to help her get through SO being away, which really seems to help reduce her stress. She is doing right fabulous now. You wouldn't even guess that she is reactive...timid? Yes. But not reactive. I don't know what she will be like when SO goes away again, though. We will see, and I will do my best to help her get through it if she needs it.

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My dog is exactly the same in the house, he will bark and lunge quite severely if they're too close and a stranger and especially if they make eye contact with him. Our trainer found sitting in the corner of the room tossing treats at him is the most effect way to deal with that at the minute. We're moving on Wednesday though and we'll finally have a utility room to shut him during people visiting with an adaptil plugin and work on people walking past the door way and throwing in treats, much safer and less intimidating!

As for his outside work, it's going very well so far, we heel passed a group of people and then had some sniffing while a kid was very close



Small steps but that's what keeps me going :D
 
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