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I have a rat problem in my home and I have tried snap traps and glue traps but they dont work. I have always been reluctant to use poisons because of my dogs. Does anyone know if the rat eats the poison then comes out and one of my dogs (3 small dogs under 25 lbs and 1 husky) gets a hold of the rat, would there be enough poison in the rat that it could harm my dogs? Anyone have any other suggestions that is pet safe/friendly?
 

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You could borrow my little Leeo.....just kidding (he is an excellent ratter), Have you considered a cat before? Just a thought. I found a stray and it is constantly bringing me presents. It brought me a good sized squirrel the other week. I don't use poisons.....just because of the dogs.....and other wildlife that could accidentally get into it. I am not sure what poison in a rat would do to either cat nor dog if they ingested it?... or any other creature for that matter...like scavangers and owls.......
 

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My Boston, Candy, loves to "hunt" for rats but her short, little legs wont let her catch any and the rats are smart enough to stay away from my Siberian Husky. I had a cat several years ago but not really interested in getting another cat right now. Thanks for the reply though! :)
 

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Yes. Especially with small dogs I would consider a poisoned rat eaten by a dog enough to cause significant harm to the dog. Rat poison is potent blood thinner and will cause coagulation issues with a dog.

Rat poisons can contain Warfarin - a potent blood thinner and Brodifacoum - an even stronger blood thinner (that also cause blood to seep from the capillary beds into the surrounding tissue). Both cause significant spontaneous (without cause by injury, lacerations or trauma) internal bleeding as they disrupt the normal synthesis in the body of Vitamin K which is vital to the ability to clot. It induces internal bleeding, shock and eventually the animal hemorrhages to death.

In dogs Brodifacoum (which is becoming more common than warfarin) is extremely toxic (it is also very toxic to humans) and has a very long half life (the amount of time it takes the body to rid itself of half the substance) of 20-130 days. Treatment/monitoring of the poisoning must continue past an acute stabilization phase as it can continue to cause problems for weeks. Humans are monitored for at least a month after a poisoning.

Warfarin "thins" human blood with daily doses as little as 2.5mg daily (warfarin does have medical uses). Brodifacoum (a second generation warfarin so to speak) is far, far stronger and is <0.01% (% w/w) proportion in some rat pellets and is able to poison rats easily.

I would not use rat poison around dogs - even if the poison is out of the dogs reach (such as on top of the refrigerator) the rat may eat the poison and then crawl/die within reach of the dogs.
 
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