Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,658 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a couple questions about feeding dogs "human food" and was wondering if anyone had any answers/suggestions.

Hot dogs are commonly used as high-value treats for some dogs. My dog really loves meaty things so we were thinking about using hotdogs as treats, however both of the varieties of (all-natural) hot dogs that we regularly purchase list dehydrated garlic as an ingredient. I was wondering if any owners have had any issues with giving hotdogs (as treats) and whether there are any varieties of hot dogs that are more suitible to feeding to dogs (garlic-free perhaps?)

On a similar note, how concerned should I be about my dog eating food items that list "spices" as an ingredient? I am thinking specifically of things like garlic powder and onion powder which might potentially fall into the "spices" ingredient on the label, rather than being listed separately.

Finally, I keep reading that dogs should not be fed peaches, plums, cherries, etc. because dogs do not know that they have pits (which are also toxic) and may accidentally injest them. Obviously it is possible for a human to remove the pit from these fruits, so I was wondering if there was another reason for not feeding these to dogs (i.e. the cyanide compounds found in the pit might also be in the flesh or skin in small quantities).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
I usually don't give my dog anything that tastes heavily seasoned. Garlic and onions can be poisonous, but the amount you might accidentally feed from giving a few hot dogs as treats is fine. Some people actually give small amounts of garlic as a flea preventative. I wouldn't personally feed basically any fruits because they are sugary and high on the glycemic index, which is fine once in a while, but I usually only give my dog "human food" in an effort to improve his diet. Most fruits aren't really an improvement. I try to stick mostly to meat and eggs, sometimes veggies (though they aren't really needed, either). Berries are probably the exception, though, since they do contain high concentrations of antioxidants. If you really want to give peaches, etc, just do your research first to make sure they aren't poisonous to dogs...I can't imagine the pit would be a major problem unless you fed them with the pit still in there, which is a bad idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,719 Posts
My understand is that fruit is fine, except grapes. We give fruit as treats from time to time - not a menu staple, but if I'm eating a bowl of watermelon and Biscuit is over there looking cute, sure she might get a little bit.

I don't think the garlic powder type seasoning is likely to cause onion toxicity for your dog, but it might cause gastrointestinal distress! I also worry about the salt content in processed meats. That said, we do use turkey dogs as treats. And I use the really disgusting Oscar Meyer ones, nothing natural about it. I get 100 treats per turkey dog so not that worried about it. You should really be using tiny pieces of treats for training purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Our dogs get carrots or frozen green beans as treats occasionally. I've also filled their kongs with cut up apples (make sure they don't get any seeds) and mashed banana. Like other posters have said it's not the foundation of their diet, just a treat. I've used hot dogs as treats in the past, though I much prefer boiled, cut up chicken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
I use hot dog bits for Butters but she gets very little - perhaps 1/3 of a small hot dog MAX; she hasn't experienced any gastro issues and she has a very sensitive stomach, so I think they're good. Just look for the plainest hotdogs you can find.

For fruit, definitely don't feed grapes or raisins as they have something that are toxic in them. I've fed Butters strawberries, blueberries, melons, watermelon, apple, all to no issues! She doesn't eat anything highly citrus such as orange, lemon or lime though, as I fear they may upset her tummy. As long as you're not feeding a whole lot of it, I think it should be okay.

There is a list of foods dogs shouldn't eat that you can avoid:
1. Weight bearing bones/marrow as they can break their teeth
2. Cooked chicken bones as they can splinter and choke a dog
3. Grapes/raisins
4. Chocolate
5. Garlic, onion (any spice, really)
6. Avocado
7. Alcohol or Caffeine
8. Milk/Dairy (yogurt may be fine, but some dogs may get the runs from dairy)
9. Macadamia nuts
10. Candy or anything with too much sugar
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,658 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My understand is that fruit is fine, except grapes. We give fruit as treats from time to time - not a menu staple, but if I'm eating a bowl of watermelon and Biscuit is over there looking cute, sure she might get a little bit.

I don't think the garlic powder type seasoning is likely to cause onion toxicity for your dog, but it might cause gastrointestinal distress! I also worry about the salt content in processed meats. That said, we do use turkey dogs as treats. And I use the really disgusting Oscar Meyer ones, nothing natural about it. I get 100 treats per turkey dog so not that worried about it. You should really be using tiny pieces of treats for training purposes.
Thanks for the reply. I would never dream of feeding any dog grapes or raisins! I was thinking peaches, apricots, etc. should be okay, but then I kept thinking is there another reason they can't eat peaches? All the websites seem to indicate its because of the pit (but who would feed their dog a whole peach anyway!?) We're just looking for new things to try. I like knowing what Snowball will (meat, potatoes, carrots) and will not (anything sweet) eat, especially if we go to visit the "grandparents", friends, etc.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top