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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So yeah as stated above, I am concidering being a fosterhome for a dog that's around 1.5 years old, it's a good dog, not a problem case, it's owner just has some real life issues making her nor being able to take care of it.

So I was wondering how it would work seeing I got a 13 week old puppy in the house?
Is it even a good idea? Scared of her getting very attached to this dog.
But it might also be good to have a dog to learn from?

Not had two dogs at once, so I'd love some info.
I haven't said yes or anything to this yet, want to find out more before doing anything hasty. My 13 week old comes first.
 

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A year is a LONG time to foster a dog. My advice is probably less dog related and more human related.

First, is the foster through a reputable rescue that can re-foster the dog if you have any difficulties? Private fosters are more risky to handle, especially for a first timer.

Second, is the year a definite time frame? As in, are the "life issues" something that is known and finite like a single service member being deployed abroad or is a year a guess for someone to get back on their feet financially, health-wise or housing-wise? If open ended, what is the consideration that this owner will never actually be ready to take the dog back? Will the dog linger in foster or will the dog become adoptable? If the dog will become adoptable, is there a major reason why foster for a year first? That is a long time out of a dog's life and a dog can get very settled in a home in a year. Just for some context, rescue I foster with recently helped a homeless couple with sheltering their dogs for a short time. The deal was 3 weeks of foster care (the couple did have jobs, they were just needing to find housing or transportation) before either taking the dogs back if they had a stable situation or surrendering them to the rescue for adoption. In this case, the couple were able to reconnect with family and take the dogs with them to a new housing situation.

Finances-- who is responsible for vet care for the next year? Vaccines, heartworm prevention, flea and tick meds, and any emergency care. Plus food. Just the basics are likely around $30-50 per month (mid-US prices) plus $50-100 for a yearly exam and vax. But if the dog swallows something dangerous and ends up in the ER getting it removed from their stomach to the tune of $2000? Who pays should be settled ahead of time in writing. Same for liability. A rescue should carry liability insurance on their dogs.

You will be dealing with a growing puppy and a still young and presumably active dog. As long as the dogs get along well, I won't say that 2 dogs means 2x the work but it is definitely more work than 1 dog.

If your dog likes dogs, then yes, she will possibly get very attached. Especially being a puppy now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A year is a LONG time to foster a dog. My advice is probably less dog related and more human related.

First, is the foster through a reputable rescue that can re-foster the dog if you have any difficulties? Private fosters are more risky to handle, especially for a first timer.

Second, is the year a definite time frame? As in, are the "life issues" something that is known and finite like a single service member being deployed abroad or is a year a guess for someone to get back on their feet financially, health-wise or housing-wise? If open ended, what is the consideration that this owner will never actually be ready to take the dog back? Will the dog linger in foster or will the dog become adoptable? If the dog will become adoptable, is there a major reason why foster for a year first? That is a long time out of a dog's life and a dog can get very settled in a home in a year. Just for some context, rescue I foster with recently helped a homeless couple with sheltering their dogs for a short time. The deal was 3 weeks of foster care (the couple did have jobs, they were just needing to find housing or transportation) before either taking the dogs back if they had a stable situation or surrendering them to the rescue for adoption. In this case, the couple were able to reconnect with family and take the dogs with them to a new housing situation.

Finances-- who is responsible for vet care for the next year? Vaccines, heartworm prevention, flea and tick meds, and any emergency care. Plus food. Just the basics are likely around $30-50 per month (mid-US prices) plus $50-100 for a yearly exam and vax. But if the dog swallows something dangerous and ends up in the ER getting it removed from their stomach to the tune of $2000? Who pays should be settled ahead of time in writing. Same for liability. A rescue should carry liability insurance on their dogs.

You will be dealing with a growing puppy and a still young and presumably active dog. As long as the dogs get along well, I won't say that 2 dogs means 2x the work but it is definitely more work than 1 dog.

If your dog likes dogs, then yes, she will possibly get very attached. Especially being a puppy now.
No, it's not from a rescue, we don't really have much of that in my country, no stray dogs, it's pretty nice that way.
But yeah that means 99% of all the forsters are private.

It's not a definite timeframe, it could be less, but also longer. I haven't spoken to the person in detail about it, just felt like I maybe could help, will ofcourse talk details if I want.
From what I know it's due to time and housing.
But I really can't say more than that cause I don't know.
And I will ofcourse talk about the finances aswell, I wont take the dog in if I have to pay for all of that.
I just wanted to help out due to the situation.
Though if the situation changed after I've had her for a year or so, and they wanted to put her for adoption I'd probably take her if she is all the things she says she is.

And yeah mine loves everyone, dogs, humans, birds, anything that moves really. ^^
This is why I am very hesitant, don't want my dog to get depressed when they get separated or anything like that.
But I also saw it as maybe a good thing for her too, to learn dog language better. Cause right now she's gotten very little interaction with dogs since most people are not even remotely interested in socializing with me.
She's started to do very strange things while meeting other dogs, since the dogs she has met and been off leash with so far has kinda just not been interested at all.
Or just barked at her, she has yet to bark back at any dog though, even though she's had so many bark at her.

But if taking this foster will in any way be harmful to her I wont even go deeper into it.
 
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