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as many know, I am a big time cattle dog lover, but I have had & would love to experience & help other breeds as well (i just have always 'happened' to end up with ACDs lol) but in the future, i would like to rescue either from a rescue or shelter, a pit bull or pit bull type, but i know they can have DA issues & sam sex aggression issues (I have both males & females in my dog family) if i do this would be the best sex to get? & could i even do it at all

this is in the future by a few yrs mind you.
 

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They are so different in personalities that it will totally depend on the dog, not the gender.

The best way to try to make sure that what you see is what you get is to try for a dog over the age of three. Even better: one over the age of three that has been in a foster situation for a few months. The pups and teens have a way of surprising you when they hit adulthood.

I can tell you that neither of mine would like to hang out with a cattle dog if the cattledog was flashing forward eye contact and acting like he or she was king of the roost. That would flair both of mine. In fact, I am on high guard around all herding breeds with my male. That "stare" that they do makes him edgy. He is lovely with hounds and soft dogs.

The bullies are a blast. I keep thinking that my next dog could be a cattle dog. This would only be after my two bullies cross the bridge. Super cool dogs and I love intensity and dogs with a real sense of themselves.
 

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I have both a Cattle Dog and a Pit Bull-type dog, and would say it's definitely an individual dog thing. Charlotte is DA, though really loves Ma'ii. There's definitely a good relationship with them that's built on mutual respect. Ma'ii seems to know Charlotte is nervous, and uneasy with other dogs, which is the source of her aggression, and there for is calm and gentle with her, even when playing, and Charlotte seems to know Ma'ii holds no ill intentions towards her, and she can fully loosen up and relax with him. It took a lot of very careful looking around and matching before we were able to find a dog that would fit her personality.

Only time there ever seems to be an issue is when they get playing hard, and Ma'ii starts chasing Charlotte, barking and biting at her legs. Charlotte does not like this, and we usually have to step in and calm Ma'ii down before it provokes something... In most cases, their play consists of wrestling and bitey faces though, so it's rare I have to step in.

That's my experience with my two, though.
 

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The best way to try to make sure that what you see is what you get is to try for a dog over the age of three. Even better: one over the age of three that has been in a foster situation for a few months. The pups and teens have a way of surprising you when they hit adulthood.
Agreed.

Just some things to think about though--
Do you still plan to be living on ranches and having different work places? This could be difficult with a bully breed since you'd be on someone else's property. It can be hard to rent with a bully, I wouldn't be surprised if it was even harder to find live-in ranch jobs where the operator would be both landlord and boss. Are you ready to turn down a job to keep your dog?

Do you intend to have the dog off-leash regularly? while IMO bullies are easy to train to stay close to you since their nature is pretty velcro, I personally discourage off-leash excluding controlled private property. No dog parks, no off-leash nature hikes, no off-leash on semi-public ranches or farms (places where guests might be, or with shared bridle paths for example).
The reason being 1) if anything happens, esp. if no one really see it, the bully is at fault. 2)people can be stupid and outside of a "dog" area, someone encountering an unexpected pit type can freak out. If the happy, friendly pit then jumps on them or tries to say HI!, it can look bad. Sure, a person who is scared of dogs might freak when an ACD or a Lab runs up to them, but the reaction to a pit/bully is usually so much stronger.

Edit for extra thought-

A lot of pits, being terriers and all, have a high prey drive. If you are regularly around chickens, barn cats, and other small animals then it is something to consider. There are cat friendly pits, but it'd be hard to say about other small animals since it'd be rare for a rescue to test that or rare for a foster to have them around to see how the dog does.
 
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