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So it seems that my new boy Body is having a little problem with separation anxiety. He is doing really well with the crate. We are rewarding him every time he goes near/in the crate and he definitely gets that picture. (He will go in there and look at me as if to say "um, where's my treat?".

When we are both leaving for work in the morning (we work opposite most days so it's not too bad) I put a Kong in with him (or treats spread throughout his blanket which he seems to enjoy finding). This is enough to keep him occupied when we leave and he doesn't react at all like he did when I just put him in (under the impression that he's supposed to be crate trained).

So that's going well. My question is how do I stop him from following me from room to room when I am home? He'll be completely asleep, but if I get up to go to the bathroom, kitchen, etc he has to follow me. If he's distracted by playing with Bridgette he's okay, but most times he won't let me out of his sight. I've never really dealt with this before so any suggestions would be awesome!!
 

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That doesn't sound at ALL like SA. That sounds like perfectly normal dog behavior. :p

There's a t-shirt I've seen at a few dog shows (but never bought.) "Owning a dog means never having to go to the bathroom alone again." :p
 

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That doesn't sound at ALL like SA. That sounds like perfectly normal dog behavior. :p

There's a t-shirt I've seen at a few dog shows (but never bought.) "Owning a dog means never having to go to the bathroom alone again." :p
Really? I mean Bridgette does do it sometimes too so at first I thought it was normal. But he does (well did before we started doing the kong/treat thing) panicking in the crate when we left. Do you think this is just because he wasn't actually crate trained then?

I felt so sure it was separation anxiety...I'll be VERY glad if it's not! I don't mind the following lol.
 

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The following you around isn't separation anxiety, but his reaction in the crate is. I would keep with the kongs when you do have to leave, but to work with his SA, when you get the time, work with putting him in the crate and treat. Then disappear for a second, come back and treat. Slowly add a little more time and repeat. If he reacts, then go back 2 steps and start again. Keep the sessions short as well, maybe 2-3 minutes at a time.

As for following you around, that's perfectly normal. My dogs do that as well. Imagine going to the bathroom and having 3 dogs following you, lol. You could even start working on stays, and some hide and seek. This can help in making him feel more secure as well, and maybe not follow as much, but it's nothing to worry about. It's perfectly normal....
 

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The following you around isn't separation anxiety, but his reaction in the crate is. I would keep with the kongs when you do have to leave, but to work with his SA, when you get the time, work with putting him in the crate and treat. Then disappear for a second, come back and treat. Slowly add a little more time and repeat. If he reacts, then go back 2 steps and start again. Keep the sessions short as well, maybe 2-3 minutes at a time.
Yeah I've been working on this over the last few days and it also seems to be working. I am able to close the bedroom door where his crate is for 5 minutes without a reaction. I'll be continuing this and also I'm looking into the "Crate Games" dvd by Susan Garrett as it looks like an awesome way to allow them to enjoy their crate!
 

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Separation Anxiety (SA) is quite rare and is a medical condition. Some of the symptoms are self mutilation, destructiveness, constant pacing/panting/whining/barking and inappropriate urination/defecation. It is a neurological imbalance that requires drug treatment.
The following you around is quite normal and missing you/wanting to be with you is part of their social nature. Also, puppies come with a hardwired survival instinct to stay close to the pack. As they mature and gain confidence, they learn that being alone is OK and that just takes time/experience.
 
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