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When people are doing basic obedience training, how many reps of each behavior does everyone do? I'm talking very basic- sit, stay, down, down/stay etc. I'm also interested in how everyone trains the recall- as in do you let your dog walk freely/freely on long line and recall/reward, do you put dog in a down stay then walk away and recall etc? Not asking about the initial learning phase, but after the dog knows its commands well and you're practicing and reinforcing what your dog already knows.
 

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I... don't actually know how to answer this. I guess once a week or so, I run through some combination of obedience and silly tricks while passing out snacks? But mostly it's used and reinforced in life, other training that builds on it, or sports that I just don't manufacture scenarios to practice it. If I see something starting to slip I will, but that's pretty rare (need to revisit stay with the 6 year old, apparently staying at the startline became iffy during 6 months off :/)

Recall, I do it all. Reward for check-ins, call back and reward, sit/stay and call to me (and front), then release again. I use the daylight out of it in life so that one gets reinforced a LOT. Early stages, it's honestly mostly just rewarding voluntary check ins, then using kissy noises/names/casual things to get them and rewarding, then randomizing the payout. The formal, come to front and sit thing gets introduced much later and has little to do with daily life.
 

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I don't have a black and white answer either. I don't do a set number or repetitions or do it for x minutes at a time. I do practice position changes, verbal cues, hand signals, distance work, etc. I have Brae do a few seconds of it (maybe down to sit to stand to down or whatever), then release him to go after a toy. However, all the fancy stuff I listed earlier is more for my ego and desire to train for precision. For functional sits/downs/etc., I do more situational training and not cue training. For example, if a horse is coming down the trail I will step to the side. I don't need to tell Brae to sit. He will either do it on his own or just be calm without sitting as they pass. If I stop to talk to someone, I don't need to say down-stay. He will either go into a settled position on his own, or he can engage with me to greet the person with my permission.

Recall, I don't do stay-come because that is never how it looks in real life. I do recalls from dogs or deer in real life situations. But not really even, because I worked one step before that (disengage, so I don't have to call). I keep telling myself I need to formally work on the COME or whistle for recall. But I literally have not worked on it for months. My philosophy is if a dog knows the rules when off leash, he will behave and I won't need to call him, and recall is reserved for emergency situations. There have not been emergency situations.

So... I don't feel like I answered your question. I do formal obedience training for fun. But my dog's obedience in real life has nothing to do with obeying me.
 

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What y'all posted does sorta answer some of what I was asking. I didn't know if other people ran through some sort of basic routine regularly as reinforcement. I go through a good 30-45 mins of basic obedience in my yard with Beau almost daily, he really enjoys it and its fun for both of us. I recently read somewhere briefly about techniques for getting more reps out of a dog during training- I'd never thought of it in terms of reps or even being that structured. I just always kinda went by instinct keeping it fun so he stays engaged and performing for me. So that of coarse got me wondering if other people do more structured stuff regularly and if I should be paying attention to numbers of reps of each thing or something.
We have almost an acre and half fenced in so the dogs are able to run loose alot. The recall I mostly just call him at random times and randomly reward with different things for coming when called. Got to wondering if experienced trainers like y'all did something more structured on a regular basis with your own dogs, barring sports and stuff like that.
What really got me thinking about the recall, was that I dont recall him from any stay position. If he's in a down stay I always walk back to him and release him, then it struck me that maybe I needed to do something different than just the random recall and rewards. The thought was how do I practise recall in a more structured manner if I dont want to recall him from the stay, you know? Or is anything more structured even necessary? Lol average pet owner questions.
 

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My structured training is about 10-maybe 15 minutes about 5 times a week. The rest of the time it is just random. Oh, we are going through a door? Work on a sit or a platz and impulse control (don't go through until I said so).

Recall? Since competition does require a recall from a down, I do practice it alternating between the dog running between my legs for the ball (it have it stationary and gangling on it's rope from my hand behind me) or a formal recall and sit in front of me. Other recalls are less formal and I do not always have the dog sit in front of me as these are while doing other things. I randomly reward with food or a ball. I do recalls here and there as well. I take a specific position if I want the dog to come and sit straight in front of me (it is the same, somewhat rigid, position I take on the field. It is a handy thing for the dog to know in case I need to quickly leash him up. He is sitting there in front of me and I can reinforce the position by saying "sit" so I can hook the leash on or whatever I am doing.

Sit.. again.. I use it while the dog is waiting for me to make up his food or before going into or coming out of his outside kennel run.

Formal training I use to build drive or pattern train the routine or to teach something new. Formal training is to perfect and to teach something new. If I am teaching something the dog finds REALLY difficult, I get it ONCE perfectly and I stop there and stop training as I want that "thing" cemented in his doggy brain (it seems to work quite well most of the time). If it is something else that he finds easier I go for the 3 good reps and then move on. Again.. depends on the dog's behavior and what the dog is telling me.

Training is a thing that happens while I am just doing stuff as much as it is a formal thing.
 

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What y'all posted does sorta answer some of what I was asking. I didn't know if other people ran through some sort of basic routine regularly as reinforcement. I go through a good 30-45 mins of basic obedience in my yard with Beau almost daily, he really enjoys it and its fun for both of us. I recently read somewhere briefly about techniques for getting more reps out of a dog during training- I'd never thought of it in terms of reps or even being that structured. I just always kinda went by instinct keeping it fun so he stays engaged and performing for me. So that of coarse got me wondering if other people do more structured stuff regularly and if I should be paying attention to numbers of reps of each thing or something.
We have almost an acre and half fenced in so the dogs are able to run loose alot. The recall I mostly just call him at random times and randomly reward with different things for coming when called. Got to wondering if experienced trainers like y'all did something more structured on a regular basis with your own dogs, barring sports and stuff like that.
What really got me thinking about the recall, was that I dont recall him from any stay position. If he's in a down stay I always walk back to him and release him, then it struck me that maybe I needed to do something different than just the random recall and rewards. The thought was how do I practise recall in a more structured manner if I dont want to recall him from the stay, you know? Or is anything more structured even necessary? Lol average pet owner questions.
I think in most cases a recall from a stationary stay isn't necessary and the stay meaning 'stay until I come back to get you' is probably ideal, tbh. For me, if I was doing it 'right' I'd use a wait to mean I'd release the dog to me and the stay to mean I'm coming back to them, but I'm kind of lazy and what I have works so I don't. (And I need some kind of stay release to me because sports and startlines), but you're fine.

Honestly if you're having fun, and the dog is having fun, you're fine. GREAT even!
 

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Take it on the road. Go to the park and do obedience on a long line. During your walk call the dog away from a sniffy place. Do sit/down stays as you blow your nose, retie your shoe or pick up poop. Practice leaving prey when safe in the back yard. I figure my dogs are fine in the situations I've trained in and will not be reliable if I haven't trained a particular scenario especially since Bucky isn't exactly a stable normal dog.

My dogs live for training sessions too. Ginger was so happy to play with me this morning when we walked to the park and did a bit of it. I don't call the dog out of a stay, call them out of a wait though. Bucky was baffled but did some good sit/wait then goes.
 
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