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I understand that getting a purebred dog is expencive I just don't know why? Why is it $1500 for a dog that's from a breeder? Pedigree is great and all but the people who don't have that kind of moneythat could give a dog a loving home cant afford those kind of prices just for a pet they would need to be also seen by a vet, and spayed or neutered??? Just wish it wasn't so expensive.
 

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Good breeders do all kinds of things to make sure their dogs are healthy and happy. Testing the parents for genetic defects, proper vet care for the parent dogs and for the puppies, early socialization so the puppies grow up to be better pets, etc. It costs a lot to do all that. Now, if someone is paying that much for a puppy from a breeder who doesn't do all that, I agree it's a ripoff!

If a good breeder is out of your price range, maybe a shelter dog?
 

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I understand that getting a purebred dog is expencive I just don't know why? Why is it $1500 for a dog that's from a breeder? Pedigree is great and all but the people who don't have that kind of moneythat could give a dog a loving home cant afford those kind of prices just for a pet they would need to be also seen by a vet, and spayed or neutered??? Just wish it wasn't so expensive.
First of all, my dog -from a reputable breeder!- was 150.00. He was also a retired show dog (finished with titles), and breeder. It was time for him to go to a new home. Second of all, shelters often have purebreds for much, much less.

Finally, while it's very possible to get a 350.00 puppy of most breeds from a back yard breeder, you are not paying just for the dog's history. You are paying for a health gaurantee (against genetic illnesses) for several years, breeder support for the lifetime of the dog, a home for the dog to go to for life, should you be unable to keep it and, most of all. You are paying for health testing, good prenatal care, properly vetted puppies that have been socialized and begun training. Those things are IMPORTANT and you aren't going to find them in a BYB puppy.
 

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Do you realize how much blood, sweat, tears and money we put into our dogs? How much it costs us to make sure our breeding dogs are genetically healthy, conformation is sound, and mentally stable, and have the ability to do what the breed was intended to do?

$1500 doesn't even cover it, not even half. We do not make money, we do this for the love of the animals, and all the money we get from sales goes back into the dogs. People who come to me for a dog, can afford those prices, and they are just as much a loving home to their pet as anyone else.

I understand people gawk at the prices, but really it is a well worth it investment if you want a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal. If not there is always the shelter, and that is a perfectly good option.
 

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It's a pay now, or pay later kind of thing, in some ways.

My family (before we knew better) got a really poorly-bred Sheltie. He was pretty cheap, at least in comparison to a high-quality Sheltie from a breeder who does all the tests and involves their dog in show or sport. He hasn't been cheap in the long run, though....deaf, arthritic, had a slipped disc that needed meds and tons of vet visits, etc. If we were to tally up the cost of his arthritis meds alone (and he became arthritic VERY young), it would make you faint.

Oh, forgot to add: his temperament is also off. He's shy and nervous, even with socialization. Meeting new dogs is a disaster for him, and people aren't much better. He is very anxious in new places, too. A good breeder would've had more stable stock, and that's something you pay for as well.

Dogs in general are a more expensive venture than people realize, to be honest.
 

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Do you realize how much blood, sweat, tears and money we put into our dogs? How much it costs us to make sure our breeding dogs are genetically healthy, conformation is sound, and mentally stable, and have the ability to do what the breed was intended to do?

$1500 doesn't even cover it, not even half. We do not make money, we do this for the love of the animals, and all the money we get from sales goes back into the dogs. People who come to me for a dog, can afford those prices, and they are just as much a loving home to their pet as anyone else.

I understand people gawk at the prices, but really it is a well worth it investment if you want a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal. If not there is always the shelter, and that is a perfectly good option.
I have a question for you, Chaos. I'm no longer looking into breeders, since I found 'stray pup' and it'll be years before I'm ready to add another, now, but when I was something that kept tripping me up was essentially this:

You say the people who buy from you can afford it. Would you be put off by a family who had to save for the initial purchase price of the dog?
 

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Many breeders have pet quality dogs for less, and of course how much you pay depends on the breed. For instance, I can get a very good Aussie pup for under $1000. But of course, whatever you pay is only the smallest part of the investment you will make over the lifetime of the dog.
 

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I have a question for you, Chaos. I'm no longer looking into breeders, since I found 'stray pup' and it'll be years before I'm ready to add another, now, but when I was something that kept tripping me up was essentially this:

You say the people who buy from you can afford it. Would you be put off by a family who had to save for the initial purchase price of the dog?
I would not be put off by it at all. Probably should have said most people that come to me can afford it right then and there. If people have to save they have to save, doesn't mean they are a bad home. Sorry I really am not good at expressing what I mean through words, never been a strong point of mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Do you realize how much blood, sweat, tears and money we put into our dogs? How much it costs us to make sure our breeding dogs are genetically healthy, conformation is sound, and mentally stable, and have the ability to do what the breed was intended to do?

$1500 doesn't even cover it, not even half. We do not make money, we do this for the love of the animals, and all the money we get from sales goes back into the dogs. People who come to me for a dog, can afford those prices, and they are just as much a loving home to their pet as anyone else.

I understand people gawk at the prices, but really it is a well worth it investment if you want a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal. If not there is always the shelter, and that is a perfectly good option.
I never implied that people who could afford a pricey purebred dog couldn't give a loving home but what you kinda are implying is that because I can't afford $1500 for a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal I should go to the shelter?
I actually didn't know what went into dog breeding THAT"S WHY I ASKED "WHY?"! Thank you for telling me what it is that goes into this pricing.
And I know that not all purebreds are that much but when I was looking into a Golden Retriever for my son a companion, I was just amazed and never knew why it was so much.
No I can't afford one of the purebred Golden Retrievers. I could actually afford vet bills for one that was healthy and had the good genetic back ground but I live pay check to pay check (sorry my luck isn't as good as others).
Anywho, I didn't want to offend anybody that is a breeder and charges this amount I sincerely just didn't know what went into it.
 

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I never implied that people who could afford a pricey purebred dog couldn't give a loving home but what you kinda are implying is that because I can't afford $1500 for a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal I should go to the shelter?
I actually didn't know what went into dog breeding THAT"S WHY I ASKED "WHY?"! Thank you for telling me what it is that goes into this pricing.
And I know that not all purebreds are that much but when I was looking into a Golden Retriever for my son a companion, I was just amazed and never knew why it was so much.
No I can't afford one of the purebred Golden Retrievers. I could actually afford vet bills for one that was healthy and had the good genetic back ground but I live pay check to pay check (sorry my luck isn't as good as others).
Anywho, I didn't want to offend anybody that is a breeder and charges this amount I sincerely just didn't know what went into it.
I'm. Trying to figure out what's wrong with advising someone to go to a shelter and save a life. Yes, you're not going to get everything that comes with a responsible breeder, but if you didn't know what those prices included before, does it really matter if you don't get it? Look into breed specific rescue, talk to shelter staff and get your name on a waiting list, or contact breeders and investigate older dogs.

I like responsible breeders. As I said, one of my dogs came from one, and I'd fully intended (and saved for) a puppy next year or so, for another, but the stray mutt puppy I brought home isn't any less of a wonderful pet for my family.
 

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I never implied that people who could afford a pricey purebred dog couldn't give a loving home but what you kinda are implying is that because I can't afford $1500 for a purebred, pedigreed, health tested, from proven stock animal I should go to the shelter?
I actually didn't know what went into dog breeding THAT"S WHY I ASKED "WHY?"! Thank you for telling me what it is that goes into this pricing.
And I know that not all purebreds are that much but when I was looking into a Golden Retriever for my son a companion, I was just amazed and never knew why it was so much.
No I can't afford one of the purebred Golden Retrievers. I could actually afford vet bills for one that was healthy and had the good genetic back ground but I live pay check to pay check (sorry my luck isn't as good as others).
Anywho, I didn't want to offend anybody that is a breeder and charges this amount I sincerely just didn't know what went into it.
I just want to make a quick comment here that if you have a good, responsibly bred, health checked and guaranteed purebred dog - you should not have to spend money on vet bills for it. Its kind of a condradicting statement 'I can afford the vet bills for a healthy, genetically sound dog..". I dont mean to pick on you, but that is the whole point of paying good money for a good, healthy , genetically sound dog, so that it DOESN'T end up costing money in vet bills. IMO, if a dog has to go to a vet more than once a year.. there's something wrong. Perhaps that is just me being slightly biased because my dogs do not go to a vet ever, for any reason. And, I will add that, I have one, $1500 pure bred, retired breeding/show dog with titles in Canada & the US, and one $150 BYB mutt, whom I offered to only pay for his initial vaccinations and check up as a puppy( I will add here, that I did not realize at the time, because of my lack of knowledge and education, that they were BYB's - I was under the impression it was "oops farm dog got pregrnant" sorta situation, and I can't lie I absolutely fell in love with them, but it wasn't until I found out later they breed several mutts on a regular basis and post the litters on Kijiji) Is my $1500 selectively well-bred, fully health tested & guaranteed show dog any healthier than my $150 randomly bred mutt? Probably not.. time will only tell I suppose but for the time being, I spend $0 on vet bills for both of them.

I'm sure you didn't offend anyone, its just that some may be touchy with this subject and don't read things the way they are meant to be read initially. It is good that you came here to find out why purebred dogs cost what they do - there is good reason for it, may not be ideal for some, but it is ideal to the sake of the breeds, and ideal to potential owners who do decide to spend the money.
 

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I just want to make a quick comment here that if you have a good, responsibly bred, health checked and guaranteed purebred dog - you should not have to spend money on vet bills for it. Its kind of a condradicting statement 'I can afford the vet bills for a healthy, genetically sound dog..". I dont mean to pick on you, but that is the whole point of paying good money for a good, healthy , genetically sound dog, so that it DOESN'T end up costing money in vet bills. IMO, if a dog has to go to a vet more than once a year.. there's something wrong. Perhaps that is just me being slightly biased because my dogs do not go to a vet ever, for any reason. And, I will add that, I have one, $1500 pure bred, retired breeding/show dog with titles in Canada & the US, and one $150 BYB mutt, whom I offered to only pay for his initial vaccinations and check up as a puppy. Is my $1500 selectively well-bred, fully health tested & guaranteed show dog any healthier than my $150 randomly bred mutt? Probably not.. time will only tell I suppose but for the time being, I spend $0 on vet bills for both of them.

I'm sure you didn't offend anyone, its just that some may be touchy with this subject and don't read things the way they are meant to be read initially. It is good that you came here to find out why purebred dogs cost what they do - there is good reason for it, may not be ideal for some, but it is ideal to the sake of the breeds, and ideal to potential owners who do decide to spend the money.
I am going to come back here to say a couple of things:
A genetically sound dog does not give you a dog who won't eat rocks and impact himself, or a dog that doesn't land from a jump wrong and break his leg, or doesn't get the new strain of dog flu going around. It's genetically sound. That means genetic issues are limited. It does not make it invincible, and to be hones t- except one dog, years ago, that bloated, most of my vet bills have come from accidents and injuries. Or routine care, in the first year - which is expensive.

And, also, many, many people will easily pay for an operation or surgery or medical care but can not do that **and** pay 1500 for the dog. I could, right at this second. Because I saved a year to build a vet-fund and to save for the purchase price of a dog. So, with saving - yes, I think anyone could have both. Without saving, no, most people can not plop down 1500.00 in cash and still be confident they can afford the start-up costs of the dog.

And that's not even touching the fact that most people don't do things like Hip Replacement for their HD dogs, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm. Trying to figure out what's wrong with advising someone to go to a shelter and save a life. Yes, you're not going to get everything that comes with a responsible breeder, but if you didn't know what those prices included before, does it really matter if you don't get it? Look into breed specific rescue, talk to shelter staff and get your name on a waiting list, or contact breeders and investigate older dogs.

I like responsible breeders. As I said, one of my dogs came from one, and I'd fully intended (and saved for) a puppy next year or so, for another, but the stray mutt puppy I brought home isn't any less of a wonderful pet for my family.
sorry I wasn't meaning that one from a shelter isn't as good or even better. Lord knows saving a life of an animal is something every person who loves dogs or even cats should experience at least once in their life time. That's how I got my boy Skinnard (cat). He was a shelter cat; well, kitten at the time (had a skinned up tail and it just fit him to a "T"). Was around 8 weeks old when I found him there and we immediately bonded and have been since, he will be with me for 5 years this month actually.
But for a dog I really wanted to know the background. Aggression, health, etc....
One day I will save enough for a Golden Retriever puppy but it just isn't in my immediate future.
I have actually never paid over $50 for a dog, of course none of them have been purebred either. They might have looked it but most of them came from oops litters. Now my Dixie girl was free from my Uncle and she was Lab just not registered and all that.
Getting off topic here, I would never say it was wrong to advise somebody to go to a shelter but it is wrong to imply that your not good enough to have a purebred if you can't afford to buy one from a good breeder.......
 

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sorry I wasn't meaning that one from a shelter isn't as good or even better. Lord knows saving a life of an animal is something every person who loves dogs or even cats should experience at least once in their life time. That's how I got my boy Skinnard (cat). He was a shelter cat; well, kitten at the time (had a skinned up tail and it just fit him to a "T"). Was around 8 weeks old when I found him there and we immediately bonded and have been since, he will be with me for 5 years this month actually.
But for a dog I really wanted to know the background. Aggression, health, etc....
One day I will save enough for a Golden Retriever puppy but it just isn't in my immediate future.
I have actually never paid over $50 for a dog, of course none of them have been purebred either. They might have looked it but most of them came from oops litters. Now my Dixie girl was free from my Uncle and she was Lab just not registered and all that.
Getting off topic here, I would never say it was wrong to advise somebody to go to a shelter but it is wrong to imply that your not good enough to have a purebred if you can't afford to buy one from a good breeder.......
I think you're reading things in that aren't implied. They're dogs, not status symbols. As I clarified up above, I had some issues when I was searching for a breeder - afraid that not having a lot of money all the time/having had to save would make them look down on me- but I think Chaos's answer was a pretty clear indication that it's not even kind of the case.

And you CAN have a purebred for very little. The guy in my avatar is a titled show dog. I got him for 150.00. From a responsible breeder. I can pull up his pedigree (which isn't stellar, admittedly) and his health gesting on the OFA website. He's. A danged good dog. And he was a largely inexpensive one.
 

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I would like to also thank PackMomma. You made a good point very good point. I wouldn't need to spend on vet bills if I did get all those things. I basically meant for shots (if not done already), spay or neutering (wouldn't want puppies). Flea medications due to the area I live in and just in case something were to come up unexpected like an injury from what ever.

And I didn't realize it was a touchy subject. Is there a way I can delete this thread so that there isn't any hurt feelings?? Lol
 

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And that's not even touching the fact that most people don't do things like Hip Replacement for their HD dogs, anyway.
I am actually saving up for this. She is doing well now on supplements but who knows what will happen down the road. She was a rescue and free and I will pay whatever it takes to keep her pain free and mobile for as long as possible.

Back to the OP. Personally I feel unless I am going to show a dog or use a dog (ie working dogs, sled dogs, herding dogs) there is no reason not to go to a shelter. You can find some great dogs (even purebreds) there. Currently my rescue has 2 purebred Great Danes that were owner surrenders because they were eating his tomato plants. Yep, you read that right.

There is nothing wrong with not being able to afford $1500 for a dog. There is also nothing wrong with not wanting to wait or save up the money. Not all shelter dogs are going to have health problems. I have 3 rescues. Only one has had any problems and that is the HD. In 6 years only once did we go to the vet other than an annual. I had a purebred Samoyed growing up, came from a GREAT litter. Granddad was the #1 Samoyed the year the litter was born. Ended up dying of cancer at about 7. So while it's nice to know what you are getting it is not an absolute guarantee the dog with never have health issues.
 

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I will often donate puppies to the right working home. Or if a pup just won't cut it to work, they are placed as pets free.

Buying from a reputable breeder does not guarantee never having a vet bill. Dogs get hurt, attacked, bloated, eat things, can have complications from routine procedures, the list goes on and on. So maybe it helps guarantee against hip or knee issues, some.genetic stuff, but by no means will it prevent vet bills.

Purchasing healthy dogs not prone to many issues (like breeds, malinois have very few health issues) will prevent many vet visits.

Anyway, this year my litter price is half of what it normally is, and I still had police departments that had to back out of purchases due to budget cuts. Two officers actually purchased their own pups. So they were discounted more. I haven't figured the cost/profit this year, but I promise I'm in the hole. What matters to me is that the dogs are working, and in great homes, not what I make off of the dogs.
 

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I am going to come back here to say a couple of things:
A genetically sound dog does not give you a dog who won't eat rocks and impact himself, or a dog that doesn't land from a jump wrong and break his leg, or doesn't get the new strain of dog flu going around. It's genetically sound. That means genetic issues are limited. It does not make it invincible, and to be hones t- except one dog, years ago, that bloated, most of my vet bills have come from accidents and injuries. Or routine care, in the first year - which is expensive.

And, also, many, many people will easily pay for an operation or surgery or medical care but can not do that **and** pay 1500 for the dog. I could, right at this second. Because I saved a year to build a vet-fund and to save for the purchase price of a dog. So, with saving - yes, I think anyone could have both. Without saving, no, most people can not plop down 1500.00 in cash and still be confident they can afford the start-up costs of the dog.

And that's not even touching the fact that most people don't do things like Hip Replacement for their HD dogs, anyway.
Oh of course, I realize this and this is just common sense - I just didn't want to get into details and elaborate on the "what if's", "accidents" etc, I am merely just talking about the whole "genetics" topic, and responsibly bred dogs. Accidents and misfortunes caused by unforseen events is just an entirely different topic and doesn't relate, in my opinion, to why you spend top dollar for pure-breds. Any dog, mutt or purebred, can have anything happen not genetically or diet related that can cost several trips to vets and heavy vet bills, and yes, one should always set aside money for that kind of thing *my apologies for not clearly defining what I meant by my statements*, BUT what I did mean is that despite any routine vet trips or accidental injuries, etc typically you are paying money for a dog that doesn't come with any preceeding health issues, and a clean bill of health and hopefully, *should not* have any genetically related health issues. What I meant is that, if any particular dog (purebred or not) is costing horrendous amounts of vet bills on an annual basis, and if, they are accidents or unforseen events that is different, obviously, but if they are recurring misfortuntes then I would begin to question if it is something I am doing or not doing to ensure the well being of my dog (ie my dog continously eats rocks and needs operations to remove blockages - Ok, first time..oops, 2nd time..well lets just say if it were me, after the 1st time I would be extremely careful and do everything in my power to ensure my dog couldn't ingest something unsafe - yes, I know..not always easy), or is it related to the diet, or, is it genetic issues (which my point is, should not be, if you're paying top dollar for a purebred)

And.. I am biased..or maybe just extremely lucky, because i'm not lying when I say (in this year alone) I have not spent a penny on vet bills, prior to that it was annual vaccines (which I don't do anymore) maybe not so much biased as lucky - but I do whatever possible for my mutt and expensive purebred to keep them healthy and out of harms way, I know accidents aren't always preventable, but they are unforseen and anyone can really only do what they can do.

But it brings me to the conclusion, that any dog, purebred or mutt, can be unhealthy or healthy, incur a wide variety of medical attention and costs, be great companions or not.. and it doesn't really matter where they came from, but there is a reason for selective breeding and a reason it costs so much (to ensure good genetic health, sound temperaments etc) and yes, I agree most people cannot afford them without saving. I had to save the $1500 for mine, took me 4 months of saving before I could have him, and I'm just really really lucky (and thankful) he hasn't costed me much more than the cost of his food. Crossing my fingers it stays that way, but I am atleast somewhat confident, he should not incur any genetic health issues - which can certainly cost an arm and a leg to treat.

As for my mutt.. well, only time will tell - I do not know his genetic history and cannot predict if its possible he could incur any genetic-related issues later in life - but so far, so good :)
 

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I would like to also thank PackMomma. You made a good point very good point. I wouldn't need to spend on vet bills if I did get all those things. I basically meant for shots (if not done already), spay or neutering (wouldn't want puppies). Flea medications due to the area I live in and just in case something were to come up unexpected like an injury from what ever.

And I didn't realize it was a touchy subject. Is there a way I can delete this thread so that there isn't any hurt feelings?? Lol
OK, and yes I should have been more clear by implying that when spending $$ on a well-bred PB dog, you *shouldn't* be spending on vet bills on conditions related to genetics, etc. Of course, one should always be aware of the unforseen, misfortunate events which I clarified myself a bit on in my other post. I hate confusing people, but I have a hard time saying everything I intend to say and elaborating specifically without creating enormous essays that most wouldn't read anyway. My point being is that, you pay top dollar for purebreds for good reasons, BUT it isn't to say that a slapped together poorly bred mutt with zero health testing cant be equally as healthy or cost less/more in vet bills. We all have to prepare for the worst and hope for the best with any dog, its just the way it is.
 

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My last two puppies came from reputable breeders, one was $1200, the other $700. While there is no guarantee, I wanted to be as sure as possible that we had a healthy dog. Our last one is our brittany who was the $700 one and I asked why she was so cheap LOL. She has an underbite, which is why. Fine for us, we're just a pet home. For the OP, if you think purebred dogs are expensive, take a look at parrots from a breeder!
 
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