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Hi, I have a 9-month-old chocolate lab puppy named Ozzy. I've had him since he was 7 weeks, and I've noticed he's progressively becoming quite a loud snorer. When he was a few months old I remember he didn't snore at all, but now it's keeping me awake! As far as I know, labs aren't known to be snorers or have breathing problems like, say, a pug. Should I be concerned? Is it possible he's got something wrong with his nasal passageways? And if not, is there any way I can stop or at least lessen the snoring? A lot of people tell me Ozzy's a bit of a chubster, so could that possibly be contributing?
 

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Usually when a dog snores it isn't because of the nasal passage unless they have pinched nares (nostirls). Usually when a dog snores it's the soft palate. My lab snores like a freight train so did the one 5 month old lab pup I had here on a boot camp. If you're worried about it, have your vet check his soft palate. Also if it is accompanied with a honking noise when he exercises definately get it checked. He might have soft trachea if he's honking and snoring.
 

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He never really makes any noises unless he sleeping (but sometimes he does make honking noises in his sleep), and sometimes when he's leaning over to lick himself he kind of snorts like a piggy, which I've always found strange since I've never seen another dog do that.

If it's his soft palate, what do they do for that? Nothing too strenuous, I hope?
 

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if it is an elongated soft palate which it usually is when a dog snores then the can do a surgery called a palate resection where they cut off the end of the soft palate with a lazer and the dog will be fine. If it's soft trachea there isn't a whole lot they can do aside of good management (like using a harness to walk insted of a collar and keeping the dog lean so you don't stress the trachea) unless there is a partial collapse. Then another surgery to insert a "brace" to keep the trachea open.
 

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I was wondering about his trachea. I always get nervous when I'm walking him because I always have to tug him because he's always darting out where he's not supposed to and he pulls - is it possible his collar is stressing his trachea too much? When he was younger and he was using a harness instead of a collar he didn't snore...
 

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You could absolutely damage his trachea by constant tugging on the lead. I would suggest a head halter or other training tool to get his leash pulling under control. Plus if you rboy is chuibby that also will NOT help his snoring issue at all. An over weight dog is not a happy healthy dog. Labs get over weight TOO easily and owners just think it's normal. It's not. A lab should weigh between 65-80 pounds (according to the breed standard). These 110 pound labs that are out there today are NOT normal and that size shouldn't be encouraged. Here is a couple pix of labs at good weight.

This guy is really pushing the limits on what I like to see for weight on a lab but a good example of a fit English Bench lab






and just to compare here's a fat lab.

 
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