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Our problem is that our 5 month old Greater Swiss Mountain dog puppy chases me whenever I run from him. He does *not* chase joggers, cyclists or strangers. He will only chase and the people we are walking with.
At first I thought it was hunting instinct but he does not chase our cats and he doesn't chase anyone but the people in our group. So I think it is herding instinct since swissies were bred to be farm dogs and herding was part of it. He will chase us and then pull our sleeves until we stop running.
How can we teach him not to do this? I don't actually mind the chasing as much as the sleeve biting. He rarely puppy bites anymore so it is only when we run that he bites. He acts like he wants us all to stick together, like a herd. How can we stop this behaviour? (also, we only use positive methods really so a non harsh, non yelling method would be best).
Other than this problem he is extremely well behaved and gentle and usually always listens so I don't think it'll be hard to teach him not to chase but I am not sure how to teach him not to do this.
 

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He's playing. And it's probably not what you want to hear, but my dog chasing me after me when I run has saved his skin a few times when he's gotten out of our fenced yard (gate not latched). Most dogs grow out of it unless you've alree initiated play. For the saftey reason, I don't know how much you want to deter the chasing behavior (unless you have small children), but you do want to teach him to play by your rules.

This means that if he jumps up or bites, game over. Calmly walk inside or into another rokm separated from the baby gate. Once you've accomplished this,the game is not as inviting for him, so he will most likely only want to engage when invited or encouraged to chase.
 

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blenderpie gave you some good advice!
Welcome to Greater Swiss Mountain Puppydom :)
I highly recommend working on having your puppy learn some self control.
I found tug was quite useful, though first it is important to learn the game. Give is REALLY important. Once you get the basics down though, teach your dog to only go after the tug when you give the release cue (ok...get it...take it...Go..yes...whatever works for you). Then work it up to dragging the tug around on the floor a bit before giving the release cue. It might help if you have your dog in a sit or a down during that time, I find Caeda had a harder time doing that if she was just standing, if she was sitting or laying she had an easier time not going for it. Keep in mind, at the start you'll only manage a second or so before they puppy goes for it, so make sure that before they go, you give the cue. If you haven't given the cue lift the tug out of the way, if your dog jumps at you, or bites at your sleeves when you do this don't flail around, do your best to just "be a tree" and keep the tug stationary and out of reach (still...don't ask for too much at first!). It takes a bit of timing, and getting to know your dog's body language, but it helped us a ton. Teaching a "long down" also helped us, along with some "doggy zen". Also, any time you do something like walk by the dog in a housecoat (which used to make Caeda go for some housecoat bites), if the dog doesn't go for the housecoat, treat for it!

Something to remember with Swissies, they weren't just bred as herding dogs, they were also flock guardians....meaning they would guard flocks. The whole Sennenhund group was used for guarding of various kinds. They can have fairly high defensive drives, and can be prone to guarding (not saying at all it WILL happen, just saying it isn't uncommon), so just watch for those kinds of behaviors and try to nip them in the bud before they become problems (been there done that!). I was warned to make sure that as Caeda gets older she is still ok with people coming into the house, onto the property etc, since some of them do get tendencies to guard property as well.

If it is any consolation, Caeda was VERY difficult to train out of the jumping and playing and sleeve/clothing biting, I remember wearing an old hoodie of my husband's was out in the yard with Caeda and all of a sudden (at 6 months!) she was hanging off of the armpit/sleeve part of the coat! She wasn't TOO bad for getting flesh when she did stuff like that, but she was quite the little hellian!!!

If your dog likes chasing though, use that to your advantage! Say Come, run away a bit, and chances are your dog will run after, when he gets to you, give him a treat and praise a LOT. Swissies can be very independent and I know Caeda was prone to go exploring if she got the opportunity, so make recall a priority! At that point, if you've got a "long down" started, increase the distance, make sure to treat well for it, and work up to your dog being a down while you are walking, dancing, running around him in circles and such. That might help minimize the chasing a bit, and the clothes biting, but for now, I would suggest using the chasing to your advantage!
 

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The ability to have a dog reliably chase you when you head in the opposite direction is a GOOD thing!!!

Last week my Lab got loose (slipped the collar over her head...it was a new collar and obviously NOT quite adjusted right..). So I started calling her, she would come a few feet closer and dart away. So I started jogging back for home. In a FLASH she was right next to me jogging along. Collar back on, adjusted better....no one harmed or injured.
 

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I agree that chasing you is actually a fantastic behavior and something you should encourage! I actively encourage my dog to chase me, because it's a great way to recall a dog, or help teach the recall.

The biting is the real issue here. If he starts biting, I would just stop and stand very still. Don't give him any attention for biting and as soon as he stops, give him lots of praise. He'll probably get excited and bite again, but then you stop and be still. If he has a solid sit or down, you can ask for that as well and praise when he does it.
 

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The biting is the real issue here. If he starts biting, I would just stop and stand very still. Don't give him any attention for biting and as soon as he stops, give him lots of praise. /QUOTE]

AND don't flap your arms at him to make him stop! I've seen people (kids especially) do this to dogs, it is hard to stay still (very hard if they got flesh!!!), but I learned fast with Caeda, the more you do that, the more they think there is a game going on!!!

EDIT: BTW, Pictures Please!!!! :D
 
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