Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, we have recently added a dobermann puppy to our family and everything is going really well, she is 11 weeks now and very healthy, she has been micro chipped, she gets her next jab next week and we are all looking forward to being able to take her out on walks, we also have a rescue 4 year old staffy x lab who is great with the kids and our new puppy but was never socialized as a puppy and tends to meet otehr dogs head on and with loads of excitement which were working on and hoping tails will also help him with.

Currently Tails (dobermann) and Bruno (lab x staffy) play regularly during the day, tails will bite anything she can get her teeth into at the moment and Bruno will happily lie on his back mouthing her while she bites his ears neck and tail, i know it is normal for puppies to play like this but should there be a limit? Sometimes it looks as if she has stopped playing and is just snapping and i dont think we should allow this but wanted to make sure with others, i dont want her to think she can play like that with other dogs.

When she has had her full set of jabs we will be taking her to obedience classes but i dont want her already thinking this behavior is ok if its not.

She picks things up quickly and has mastered going toilet outside with only a few accidents, she loves to chew anything but has her toys and tends to just go for them (and my blanket if its about) if our older dog doesnt want to play he will growl at her telling her so and we redirect her onto her toys.

So really what i would like to know is how far i should let her go with play fighting with him? Sometimes he is asking her to play he lies on the floor and nibbles her legs until she retaliates so i know that they enjoy it i just dont want to be letting it go to far.

This is my first real puppy, i had one when growing up but my parents did most of the work same for my partner as well we were both brought up around dogs its just this young stage were not so sure of and im doing tons of research to make sure we do it right
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,849 Posts
You don't want to allow bullying. If the puppy has had enough you need to step in and give a time out. Puppies often need only a second or two to bounce back. It's important for Bruno to learn how to calm down, and it's important for the puppy too. Practice breaking up their playfights, even when it's not getting serious, rewarding the dogs, then letting them go back to playing. Stop any play that makes you uncomfortable, and definitely stop play that seems like bullying where Tails has had enough and Bruno isn't stopping. Puppies do need to learn bite inhibition. Personally I tend to "let dogs be dogs" and teach each other when enough is enough by letting out a yelp. However, if Tails isn't yelping and Bruno isn't reading the cues to stop for a second (such as looking away, sniffing, shaking off) then you do need to step in. Bruno can be taught those skills, and Tails is at the prime age for learning from other dogs.

I strongly suggest you find other puppies for Tails to play with so he can learn proper socialization since Bruno is lacking some skills. You want to make sure Tails becomes fluent in doggy language, and if he is only learning from Bruno then he will have the same gaps. You may want to look into more formal training for Bruno to learn those skills as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
You don't want to allow bullying. If the puppy has had enough you need to step in and give a time out. Puppies often need only a second or two to bounce back. It's important for Bruno to learn how to calm down, and it's important for the puppy too. Practice breaking up their playfights, even when it's not getting serious, rewarding the dogs, then letting them go back to playing. Stop any play that makes you uncomfortable, and definitely stop play that seems like bullying where Tails has had enough and Bruno isn't stopping. Puppies do need to learn bite inhibition. Personally I tend to "let dogs be dogs" and teach each other when enough is enough by letting out a yelp. However, if Tails isn't yelping and Bruno isn't reading the cues to stop for a second (such as looking away, sniffing, shaking off) then you do need to step in. Bruno can be taught those skills, and Tails is at the prime age for learning from other dogs.

I strongly suggest you find other puppies for Tails to play with so he can learn proper socialization since Bruno is lacking some skills. You want to make sure Tails becomes fluent in doggy language, and if he is only learning from Bruno then he will have the same gaps. You may want to look into more formal training for Bruno to learn those skills as well.
Sorry i dont think i made myself clear 99% of the time its Tails starting the playing and getting quite snappy with it, i can stop Bruno playing at any time and get him to rest where she wont do this, when they play fight if either hurts the other they do yelp and things slow down for a moment.
Tails will pin Bruno down by his throat while they play and pull his ears, i was shocked the first time i saw this as she is so little compared to him but he just seems to submit to her.

We currently end the game when it looks like its getting a bit snappy, i dont want either of them getting hurt and i also dont want them to think they can do as they please, we control the games even if Tails doesnt get it yet.

She will be starting puppy obedience classes in a few weeks she has her next jab next week so will be a couple of weeks after that she can start meeting other dogs.

We have been doing training with Bruno for his lack of dog skills since we got him and he is coming along but its slow he learns everything else so quick but were hoping we have found the right class for him (like a puppy class but for his size) Every time we walk him we try to introduce him to other dogs and use the techniques we have been shown to stop him trying to dominate the situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
I think Sibe read it backwards. Pits/Labs are fairly indestructible, so Tails may be a little rougher than other breeds will like. However, she may be fine with Pits, Labs, Rotts, and Dobbies ? I've seen a well socialized Pit self-handicap, playing safely with pups, and even Yorkies (except for stepping on them :) ) ...

When you get the chance, I suggest that you introduce them to other socialized Labs and Pits, with similar energy, then begin socializing with less energetic dogs. ... However, I think that play is as important as training... as long as you can control the energy and keep it from escalating beyond play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
One of the reasons we got a dobbie pup was we needed something that could handle itself with an energetic lab x staff as he is quite big and muscly and plays quite rough, we rescued him but were told he wasnt socialized as a puppy from our trainer when she watched his behavior. We are going to socialize Tails with everything and anything we can just have to be a bit more selective with Bruno, if its a smaller breed than he is he tends to knock it over in is excitement and things get out of hand, we have only let him off with a few dogs, ones who are big enough and strong enough to tell Bruno what is out of order. Hopefully as Tails is going to be socialized with many other dogs at obedience classes and on walks she wont be as rough, ive learnt today that if i want her to be gentler than Bruno is to stop their play after a few mins and not let it go to far so im hoping that it works and she is a well socialized dog at the end of it all :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,849 Posts
Ooooh yes I did read it backwards, sorry!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,674 Posts
Even at 8 months, my pup knows when he's had enough, and if he can, he will jump up and kind of air bite after the other dog a few times to get them to back off. If he's pinned (it happens, he's small) and he can't get up, he'll squeal really loud which will usually startle the other dog off, then if the other dog doesn't back off/stop, then he'll do the air biting. There's no question when he's had enough! (We generally try to cut it off ahead of time though by separating him and the other dog if it looks like he's been pinned too long)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Our older dog never has enough so he doesnt tell her to back off or end the game. Since posting this ive been allowing a few mins play at a time and ending their game when it seems to be getting to much, both dogs have given me more respect since and will listen to me more when i say enough thats the end of the game. Sometimes Tails is still full of energy so we redirect her onto her toys and if she still wont leave the older dog she goes into a room on her own and her toy to let off steam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
One of the 'problems' with a gentle, well-socialized adult is that they cannot protect themselves from rambunctious puppies. So, you are right to rescue your dog. The dynamics may change when Tails is about 10 mos old. That's about the age that puppies lose their get-out-of-jail Free card.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top