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Sorry for all the newb questions but if you guys could help me out one more time with your thoughts etc.

We are still in the process of finding the right dog for our family and have decided that no matter how much we try to fight it, my wife and I are PitBull lovers and theres no other breed for us.

So now we are stuck between a grown dog from a rescue or shelter or a pup.
We have 3 kids from 15 months to 8 years old, so one of the main questions I have is in regards to my baby. Im wondering if a pup would be better b/c Im not sure how we could assert her (the baby) as dominant in the dogs eyes if its an adult dog. Does that make sense?

Adult pros, well its trained and we already know its temperment.....however I havent met a pit yet that wasnt completely consumed with pleasing the family.....but I guess my concern would be that and adult coming in and meeting the kids for the 1st time might be unpredictable? A pup could grow up with the kids and not know life w/o them.....but I really would like to hear your thoughts.
 

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I would actually suggest going with an adult from a rescue that really screens well for temperament (Something along the lines of BAD RAP from San Francisco or Out of The Pits in Albany, NY). Pit puppies are so darn MOUTHY.
 

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If you adopt an adult, the shelter or rescue you go to will most likely want your entire family to meet the dog at least once before adopting it. Even if it's not a requirement by the shelter I think it's something you should do anyway. Make sure everyone gets along before the dog comes home.

Most shelters/rescues do temperament tests before deciding if a dog is adoptable. I've found that most that accept Pit Bulls tend to set the bar even higher because of the stigma the breed has. So that is one good thing with getting an adult dog, you will already have an understanding of the temperament and whether the dog is good with kids, other pets etc. However, there's no guarantee; lots of dogs act completely different in a shelter environment vs. in a home. I'd find out if the dog had been in a foster home first. I personally think dogs who live in a foster home before being adopted are better adjusted and there's a better understanding of what their temperament and character is like.

Most shelters don't do TT's on puppies, and if they do it's more like an "aptitude test". Puppies are hard to TT because their true personalities haven't quite shown through yet. Not to mention that a lot of what shapes a dog (besides just genetics) is experiences, so you really don't have much idea on how that pup's going to turn out. Though you can control his environment the best you can and socialize him well and everything like that, it's still hard to tell what may trigger fear in the dog and what not.

Also, because you have such young kids, I'm not sure a puppy is the best idea. Puppies take up a lot of time and energy, and so do kids! I've met more than my share of people who got a puppy while they had fairly young kids and the dog ended up being given up or turned into an "outside" dog because it was too much work. Not to mention that puppies nip and chew on everything, and can hurt little kids even if they don't mean to!

I haven't had much personal experience with Pit Bulls, though I love the breed, and have known several people who have been into them. From the stories I've heard, rescuing an adult Pit Bull isn't much different from getting a puppy as far as how devoted the dog is to you. Just like any dog, given time they will bond to you and your family as if they'd been with you their entire life.

My best advice is to weigh the pros and cons of each (write down a list if you have to) and no matter which you choose; have your whole family meet the dog BEFORE taking it home. You can also see if the shelter will allow you to "foster to adopt". Kind of like a "test drive" to see if the dog suits into your family before actually officially adopting it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ya I agree with all above....

We are actuall going up to oakland anmals shelter to chek out a couple dogs that have been through the 'badrap' training tomorrow....
 

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I would actually suggest going with an adult from a rescue that really screens well for temperament (Something along the lines of BAD RAP from San Francisco or Out of The Pits in Albany, NY). Pit puppies are so darn MOUTHY.
if you mean by 'mouthy' the playful biting? or the its mine growl when its playing with a toy? Eris does the play biting so at this time i wont let her alone unsupervised with my son(he's 5 months old), coming from my experience thus far with a pit puppy. I would go for an older dog that is from the shelter that has gone through the puppy stage...so far eris favorite chew toys...my sons socks, my daughters shoes, and any baby toy/bottle that lands on the floor...dont get me wrong i love her to death. But unless you are prepared for more 'baby proofing' and some sleepless nights and the housebreaking go with the young adult.

j
 

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You gota remember too, not all adult dogs are necessarily "trained", and "young adult" basically means "puppy" lol When I got Linkin he was 8 months old and had ZERO training. He wasn't house broken and he STILL occasionally chews on things (he's over 2 now).

So if you're going for adult you need to decide how adult you want, and look at the dogs as individuals as well.
 

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DEFINITELY go with BAD RAP if you're in the area. They screen so well, and you know they're looking for the best fit for dog and owner because they're trying to better the breed.

I would go with an adult from them, absolutely.
 

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I agree, but in my case a puppy is better. I have a house bunny,cats, and even cows. It's not impossible but it's definitely hard to find an adult that wouldn't bother any of these, and would take alot of training if we decided to take that route. We've foster serveral adults who didn't bother the bunny but the second she ran around during one of her zoomies they were in for the chase.:eek: But in most cases an adult is better!
 

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I agree, but in my case a puppy is better. I have a house bunny,cats, and even cows. It's not impossible but it's definitely hard to find an adult that wouldn't bother any of these, and would take alot of training if we decided to take that route. We've foster serveral adults who didn't bother the bunny but the second she ran around during one of her zoomies they were in for the chase.:eek: But in most cases an adult is better!
i understand that. i have bunnies, rats and cats. my pup follows my lop bunny around trying to play with him.
 
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