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My chocolate toy poodle Sonny (about 10 weeks old) is generally very sweet and well-behaved (besides the housebreaking...) but I was wondering how I should discourage him from nipping. His bites don't hurt really right now since he only has baby teeth and since he is teething I understand...but I don't want it to be a habit as he gets older...

Thanks a bunch for your help!
 

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When he bites, yelp, turn around and ignore him for 10-15 minutes. He'll learn that biting=no fun and games. Or give him something appropriate to chew on first.
 

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When he bites, yelp, turn around and ignore him for 10-15 minutes. He'll learn that biting=no fun and games. Or give him something appropriate to chew on first.
I agree, except that I think 10-15 minutes is excessive. Even at 5 minutes he is likely to forget why he was being shunned. I think it is more imprtant to ignore every time, for a few seconds, than it is to ignore for an extended period of time.
 

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Dr. Ian Dunbar has a great chapter on why and how to teach bite inhibition in his book Before and After[You Get a Puppy. (It's also in the smaller book After You Get a Puppy). He discusses learning bite inhibition as THE most important thing for a dog. They first have to learn to have a soft mouth, and then to not mouth people at all. Try doing a google search for bite inhibition ian dunbar. I think he has some articles on the web about it.

Edit:
I did a search and found this link: http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/teaching-bite-inhibition. It's a summary of the chapter in the book.
 

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Spotted and Pawz are right and my husband is dealing with this currently. Mollie (5mos) liked to mouth everything so I would yelp(just like a dog) and give her another toy or I would get up and leave for a minute. The bitting stopped pretty quick, except my husband liked to play rough and I nipped that pretty fast as well but now every time he wants to pet her she wants to bite his hands. She only does that with him and no one else...I've told him how to fix it but he doesn't listen as well as the dogs do.
 

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These methods are based on Dunbar's approach, as referenced by dilbert. ... The general approach:
1. Yelp or say Ouch (choose one) EVERY time Sonny nips. He should startle. Praise and pet him. He will nip you again.
2. When he nips again, Yelp again. After he stops and startles, praise and pet. He may bark or play bow.That's an apology- praise.
3. When he nips the third time, Yelp. then turn your back for 15 - 30 seconds, resume playing.
4. On the fourth time, Yelp, then put him in time-out by YOU leaving him by himself for 2 min. Then, come back to play.
5. On the fifth time, Yelp, then stop the session. Do something else.

A sensitive pup will nip more softly, but most may not learn, yet. However, after a good night's sleep, Sonny should be nipping with less force. After the second night's sleep, continuing with the 5 steps above, you should notice a significantly softer mouth. You should only need a tune-up now and then, and you'll need to re-train at about 5 mos, when the adult teeth come in.

The idea is that pups in the litter will yelp when one pup is too rough, quickly learning rules of play based on yelps and withdrawal of attention. When I learned how to apply this, I was able to use "yelp" as a type of dog communication meaning that "I don't like that."

@Mollie - I have a 10 yo Lab mix and we play a very, noisy vicious-sounding tug-of-war. When he wins, he will poke me with the toy, so that the game resumes, but his teeth almost never touch my skin - unavoidable accidents, only, in both directions. However, after I taught him Bite Inhibition, I used the yelp to help him learn the rules of tug. If he won and ran (wanting me to chase him), I yelped, then quickly went in and ended the game. He could chew the tug toy, but what he wanted was the tug interaction, so he learned quickly .... Very powerful method, when you learn it.
 

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I do everything I can to avoid it happening in the first place; keep my hands out of mouth's reach and stick a toy in their mouth before they nip. If they do make contact with me, I yelp. LOUDLY. Not only to teach, but because it HURTS!
 

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Hanksimon is right about the "yelping". It works! because every time they bite and you start to yelp and ignore them for a few seconds, they would wonder at first, why? But after a few tries he would come to realize that biting is wrong.
Base on my experience my Dog loves to play struggle games and he loves to bite! So i decided to make a way for her to stop that kind of habit.

I tried yelping like a Dog every time she starts to bite (Since that's what she does if she feels any pain) Just for her to realize that she is hurting me already. After a few days, changes starts to happen! Just be consistent and you will succeed!
 

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I tried a number of things when training my puppy. There were several websites that said different things, but the thing that worked the most was the high-pitched yelp (the louder the better). But instead of ignoring him, I immediately affirm the stop of the bad action and I offer my hand back. Usually he will just lick my hand, and then I give him a treat. If the biting continues I will ignore him then. Another thing I try to do is stay armed with appropriate toys to bite. I can usually redirect his biting to something other than my hand. But training him not to bite in the first place will be the best thing.

When we first got our dog he was an extremely hyper, over-excessive biter. His improvement was night and day within two days of training.
 

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Don't I know it, My husband has taught more bad habits to our pets and livestock by playing with them than they would learn having never had contact with humans. I tell him he is the worst pet I've got.

I have just brought home a 9 week puppy 2 days ago and have been trying to deal with nipping/biting already. Pixie is an extremely sensitive dog and has already learned where to go potty, how to sit, lay down, and shake paws with just 2 days and very short training sessions. I was telling her no when she nipped, but I like the forum's solution better. Pixie is a Coton de Tulier and as a breed they are supposed to be very bright. I plan for her to be a therapy dog, so learning appropriate manners is essential. I will try your solution and report on its success. Thanks for the great tip.
 
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