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I acquired my Sheltie from a dog store in the GTA (Toronto). After getting it I realized by its actions it was a puppy mill dog, abused, with even it's rear end being weak. It was scared of everyone and everything. I tried to get it on a regular collar but wanted nothing to do with that. To bring him out of his shell and do some socialization, that he never had, enrolled him in pet care at Ajax Ontario two times a week to play with other dogs and puppies. After 3 months I gained its confidence that he knew there was no more abuse coming his way and was able to get a prong collar on him by distracting him with food as I put the collar on. Did this for a week 2 times a day. Then after a week attached the lead and praised him when he took 1 step towards me as I gently put pressure on the lead letting off the pressure as soon as he moved. Over the next few days repeated the exercise and then he knew what was expected of him. Expanded it to walking in the apartment corridor of which he was terrified but he is ok now. With this confidence he had gained in walking with the prong collar today walked him around the block and he was hesitant at strange noises but overall was great. This was my goal to have him walking and took 4 months of patience and persistence. I am happy that I can go walks with him now. He was what I would define as a "rescue".
 

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Not sure the point of your first post.
 

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Splitting hairs, but buying a dog from a store (when it is common knowledge that pet stores get their dogs from mills) does not a rescue make.

I would bet that your dog was not abused, but is just genetically fearful and sensitive - which for a poorly bred Sheltie is not surprising as Shelties can be prone to that anyway.

Personally, I wouldn't put a prong collar on a puppy, period, especially a fearful one. You can teach leash pressure with a flat collar or even a harness. But maybe that's just me.
 

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I don't see the point of a prong collar especially give, the noted behaviors. Not really an issue inn yoiur hallway, but around the block walking has too many variables. The theory seems sound enough, get reaction with gentle force and all but all to often it doesn't survive real world experiences. With a well educated,they can be a useful tool but for novice dog owners, significant injury can occur when misused. Best used in a quit safe environment .... in the "real world" with cats, traffic and big dogs, prey / fear / aggressive responses are unpredictable and dog often will respond to emotion and not training. In such instances.

As for advice, I'd suggest waiting to 6 months or so; it's important that things are fot properly or they will cause injury and you pup is growng at a rapid rate . At that point if you want to continue using the prong collar, spend some time with an experienced trainer and learn the proper fit, methods and environment to use the collar. I had a particularly prey driven Lab and a friend gave me one. After putting it on me, I chose not to use it as it felt uncomforatable just from it's own weight and given his observed behaviors, didn't think I could trust him (and me) enough not to cause injury. I set it aside thinking I don't it might serve as a last resort. Tried a "head collar" and had great success, quite relieved that I didn't have to use the other alternative.

Here's a balanced article on prong collar usage that you might find useful

 

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I acquired my Sheltie from a dog store in the GTA (Toronto). After getting it I realized by its actions it was a puppy mill dog, abused, with even it's rear end being weak. It was scared of everyone and everything. I tried to get it on a regular collar but wanted nothing to do with that. To bring him out of his shell and do some socialization, that he never had, enrolled him in pet care at Ajax Ontario two times a week to play with other dogs and puppies. After 3 months I gained its confidence that he knew there was no more abuse coming his way and was able to get a prong collar on him by distracting him with food as I put the collar on. Did this for a week 2 times a day. Then after a week attached the lead and praised him when he took 1 step towards me as I gently put pressure on the lead letting off the pressure as soon as he moved. Over the next few days repeated the exercise and then he knew what was expected of him. Expanded it to walking in the apartment corridor of which he was terrified but he is ok now. With this confidence he had gained in walking with the prong collar today walked him around the block and he was hesitant at strange noises but overall was great. This was my goal to have him walking and took 4 months of patience and persistence. I am happy that I can go walks with him now. He was what I would define as a "rescue".
All of that could have been accomplished without the use of a prong collar.

Buying a puppy mill puppy is not adopting a rescue. Instead, it supported the abusive place the dog came from, as you now know. Your dog was abused, but that doesn't mean he is a rescue dog. If you mean a dog recovering from trauma, yes, he is that. But not a rescue dog as the term is used in the dog world.
 

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I can only say this. Your puppy that you must love was likely never abused. If your puppy came from an disreputable breeder it is more likely your puppy's genetic temperament is fearful. Temperament is hard wired.

Congratulations on making the progress you have.
 

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The first mistake was buying a puppy from a pet store. Most of the dog-loving community knows you should never do that because pet stores get puppies from questionable sources. The only thing you need is patience. My dog was also scared and fearful. Doesn't have anything to do with being abused. They're in a new environment and need time to adapt. One of the things you can do is simply let the dog drag their leash behind them. The dog will get used to the pressure and pretty soon they'll be comfortable with the leash. Plus, not sure what the prong collar's point here is?
 

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I acquired my Sheltie from a dog store in the GTA (Toronto). After getting it I realized by its actions it was a puppy mill dog, abused, with even it's rear end being weak. It was scared of everyone and everything. I tried to get it on a regular collar but wanted nothing to do with that. To bring him out of his shell and do some socialization, that he never had, enrolled him in pet care at Ajax Ontario two times a week to play with other dogs and puppies. After 3 months I gained its confidence that he knew there was no more abuse coming his way and was able to get a prong collar on him by distracting him with food as I put the collar on. Did this for a week 2 times a day. Then after a week attached the lead and praised him when he took 1 step towards me as I gently put pressure on the lead letting off the pressure as soon as he moved. Over the next few days repeated the exercise and then he knew what was expected of him. Expanded it to walking in the apartment corridor of which he was terrified but he is ok now. With this confidence he had gained in walking with the prong collar today walked him around the block and he was hesitant at strange noises but overall was great. This was my goal to have him walking and took 4 months of patience and persistence. I am happy that I can go walks with him now. He was what I would define as a "rescue".
As soon as it is warm enough, I hope you take your dog outside to smell the smells. My maltipoo came from the local pound's "decompression" program. I suspect she was a breeder that was tossed in the desert after her last litter had been weaned. It was a long road from "little lamb" to crazy runner dog (10+ km) and sweetheart that approaches total strangers for ear rubs.
 

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The first mistake was buying a puppy from a pet store. Most of the dog-loving community knows you should never do that because pet stores get puppies from questionable sources. The only thing you need is patience. My dog was also scared and fearful. Doesn't have anything to do with being abused. They're in a new environment and need time to adapt. One of the things you can do is simply let the dog drag their leash behind them. The dog will get used to the pressure and pretty soon they'll be comfortable with the leash. Plus, not sure what the prong collar's point here is?
Interesting science there:

C-BARQ ranked several characteristics based upm source of the puppy .... Breeder, Pet Store, Shelter, Friend / Relative (FR), Stray, Other . With Best, order is 1st Best / 2nd Best; with Worse it's Worst / 2nd Worst.

Owner Directed Aggression: Best = Breeder, Shelter ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
Persistent Barking: Best = Breeder, Shelter ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
House Soiling: Best = Breeder, Stray ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
 

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Interesting science there:

C-BARQ ranked several characteristics based upm source of the puppy .... Breeder, Pet Store, Shelter, Friend / Relative (FR), Stray, Other . With Best, order is 1st Best / 2nd Best; with Worse it's Worst / 2nd Worst.

Owner Directed Aggression: Best = Breeder, Shelter ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
Persistent Barking: Best = Breeder, Shelter ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
House Soiling: Best = Breeder, Stray ..../ .... Worse = Pet Store , FR
Not entirely sure what your point here is? I feel like you're supporting my theory here. Pet store puppies come from questionable sources, but puppies need time to adapt to new environments and get used to new owners, rules, walking on a leash, etc.
 
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