Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What do people do or recommend when a puppy is in full 'freak-out' mode? When I take my puppy into the yard, she'll have a span of time where she is tearing around the yard, play biting anything on me she can reach (today she drew blood on my shin and my face when I bent over to grab her), and hanging/tearing my clothes. During this time of 'freak-out' she doesn't listen to a word - no sit, down, etc., - even if I offer up treats.

I've tried waiting her out, but she just waits with me until I move then she's back to freak out. I've tried grabbing her and holding her until she relaxes, but that's not always possible as she's quick. I've tried ignoring and turning my back on her but she just bites the back of my shorts. Do people have a plan for when this happens? Should I grab her and put her in her crate? Should I just leave her and let her run around until she's more subdued? Is this just typical puppy and in a month or two I can plan on a less energetic and more mindful pup? Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,658 Posts
How old is she? When is this behavior happening during the day? Every time you take her outside? At certain times of day? What is she doing just before you take her out? How much physical exercise and mental stimulation does she get?

There are a bunch of things that can cause this behavior, but they all relate to the dog being unable to mediate her emotional state - think toddler screaming when something super exciting happens (or otherwise over-reacting to something). In polite adult society, screaming is not generally an appropriate response, but a toddler 1) hasn't learned how to behave in polite society yet, and 2) hasn't yet developed the mental/emotional skills to keep himself under control. Same thing with this behavior in a lot of puppies - the puppy just hasn't learned how to regulate it's emotional state yet. That will come with maturity, and some training from you (mostly impulse control games and rewarding calm behaviors).

I do NOT recommend chasing or trying to grab her physically, mainly because it may become a game to her which could cause a variety of problems down the road. I know it kind of defeats the purpose of having a fenced yard, but for potty breaks at least, I would take her out on a leash or long line and be booooooring. As best as you can, just stand there and wait for her to do her business. When she goes into a "freak out", will she redirect onto a toy - a tugtoy or a ball, etc.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I agree with Gingerkid. A combination of working on impulse control and calm behavior as well as your dog getting older should reduce the frequency of the zoomies. That being said, my 2 year-old 90lb Rottie had an attack of the zoomies this afternoon and went galloping around the yard with a 2x4 in his mouth so don't expect zoomies to totally go away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
I hate when dogs stop zoomies. Sassy was zooming to her 15th year, you would see a little rounding of the back and jump forward then it was over. I'm delighted when new dogs feel comfortable enough to zoom here. I've never been the focus of zoomies with mouth though. Worst was zoomies into my knees, bad enough.

I've had success getting the dog to come to a tug then after a minute or so of over the top tug ask for a release then cue tug again so I'm in on all the goofiness. That's a dog that knows tug with rules, not a pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
That being said, my 2 year-old 90lb Rottie had an attack of the zoomies this afternoon and went galloping around the yard with a 2x4 in his mouth so don't expect zoomies to totally go away.
Lol! I got a mental image there and it's adorable :)


To the OP - I have the same questions as gingerkid. You did state she is a puppy so she will likely grow out of it to some extent. I would suggest taking her out on leash or long line. If she's doing well start giving her more line. If she starts getting crazy shorten the line so she can't go nuts. Then reward (something very high value) when she is calm or is just sniffing around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
She is 18 weeks. We have a fenced in yard so we usually bring her out and let her run (not a huge yard, but big enough for a 20 lbs puppy).

We train her about 10 -20 minutes every time we feed her, including before we go out into the yard. We also walk her every morning for 30 minutes and usually in the evening too. She just got

She's a border/aussie mix so she's high energy to begin with, but her biting and jumping is getting out of hand.

I try the toy route, but really she's a velcro dog and wants to be jumping/biting/licking me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
Take cover and let her get that energy out. Have you considered just taking an ex pen out there and stepping into that when she gets bitey? That way she can't get to you, and you don't have to touch her, just move away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
She could be so used to doing it now that she's learned that going outside = zoomies and crazy energy. I would try the long lead method so she learns that going in the yard doesn't always mean she gets to run around like mad.

My dogs got it into their heads that after returning from our morning walks they could run around in the yard and get the zoomies. I don't know why they started this, but they would be perfectly calm and well behaved on our walk and as soon as I would get back to the yard and take their leashes off they would bolt and start running around like crazy and wrestling. I eventually started putting one of them directly in the house and letting the other into the yard to go potty, then switching. They were okay on their own, but the two of them together was chaos.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top