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Hello everyone. New to this forum - frankly, new to any forums. But I am very concerned. I have an 8 months old Cavapoo female puppy. She is a very picky eater to the point that she won't eat. She is healthy in every ay. happy, very active, no other issues. Was checked for a physical and up to date on all her shots. I have tried every food possible - kibble, wet, combinations, etc. She simply not interested. Treats - no problem. Help!!!
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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As you have gotten her checked out by the vet (always a good first action), you can work on it as a behavioral issue.

Put the food down, if she doesn't eat it within 10 minutes, pick it up and don't put food back down until her next mealtime. As long as she doesn't eat her meal, no treats.

And make sure that everyone in the family follows this rule. No slipping chips or popcorn while watching tv. No sneaking bacon off the breakfast plate. If you have small kids, make sure they only eat at the table so their food isn't in easy reach of the dog.

If you don't want to always provide it, don't add it to the meal. For instance, if you don't want to feed them chicken every meal, every day, for the rest of the dog's life, then don't add it into the meal in an effort to entice them to eat. Put down exactly what you expect them to eat.

It usually only takes a couple meals, before the dog decides that eating the meal in front of them is smart.

Once the dog starts eating her meals, you can add treats back in, but do so sparingly.

You can use the treats as rewards for behavior but make them very small bites. If not doing treat training, then limit the treats to a specific time. My dogs get a dog biscuit at bedtime and another after their first potty break in the morning. They don't get more than that on a regular basis. Very rarely, I will give them a special treat (birthdays, holidays, etc). And they get very small sized treats for training purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As you have gotten her checked out by the vet (always a good first action), you can work on it as a behavioral issue.

Put the food down, if she doesn't eat it within 10 minutes, pick it up and don't put food back down until her next mealtime. As long as she doesn't eat her meal, no treats.

And make sure that everyone in the family follows this rule. No slipping chips or popcorn while watching tv. No sneaking bacon off the breakfast plate. If you have small kids, make sure they only eat at the table so their food isn't in easy reach of the dog.

If you don't want to always provide it, don't add it to the meal. For instance, if you don't want to feed them chicken every meal, every day, for the rest of the dog's life, then don't add it into the meal in an effort to entice them to eat. Put down exactly what you expect them to eat.

It usually only takes a couple meals, before the dog decides that eating the meal in front of them is smart.

Once the dog starts eating her meals, you can add treats back in, but do so sparingly.

You can use the treats as rewards for behavior but make them very small bites. If not doing treat training, then limit the treats to a specific time. My dogs get a dog biscuit at bedtime and another after their first potty break in the morning. They don't get more than that on a regular basis. Very rarely, I will give them a special treat (birthdays, holidays, etc). And they get very small sized treats for training purposes.
Thank you so much. Will follow advice and let you know how it works.
 

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Yes, and I will add "no drama" to that. Don't beg or even encourage her to eat in any way. Just fix her food, put it down with a "here you go", and walk away. Anything not eaten in ten to twenty minutes gets picked up in the same calm manner, and she doesn't get anything until her next scheduled feeding. If you use treats for training during the day, using her regular kibble is a good option.

It is the rare healthy dog that will starve themselves, and this method usually only takes a few days for the "I guess I'd better eat while I have it" starts to kick in. If you give this method a solid try (say maybe a week) and you still aren't making any real progress with getting her to eat, then this webinar (paid resource) looks into different methods. dog-ibox » “But my dog isn't food-motivated.” Actually, it wouldn't hurt to go ahead and get the webinar anyway.
 
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