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I have a 14 week old puppy and she is moderately well behaved most of the time but there are two big areas that are killing our enjoyment with her I'd like help with:

1) When we are outside in the yard, she jumps and bites constantly. We've tried everything from sticking out a knee to block her, reward her when she gets down, turn our back on her, etc. but she consistently and without hesitation does it every time she is in 'play mode'. She has ripped and torn untold shorts and caused cuts and bruises. Thoughts?

2) Similarly, she jumps on the couch and coffee table constantly. We tell her "off" and reward her, so she's learned if she jumps up and immediately gets down she gets a reward. In other words, it seems to be encouraging her. When we try to ignore her, she just starts chewing things - like that couch - that we can't ignore. Thoughts on this as well?
 

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1) Yay puppies. That's what they do. It's most likely a mixture of overexcitement, poor impulse control, and the simple fact that she's a 14 week old baby puppy. When she jumps up and nips, play time ends for a few minutes. Then go back to play, and repeat as necessary. It will take a while for her to learn that she should keep her feet on the ground and teeth to herself when she is playing with humans. You can probably expect this to last the next couple of months. Also, having a few fun yard toys out there for her helps and gives her something to do instead of chewing on humans.

2) Smart dogs figure that out, lol! Instead of cueing off and then rewarding, just gently remove her from the furniture, no reward. But, reward her for staying on the floor on her own. Make sure she has a bed of her own, too, that she gets rewarded for staying on. Honestly, I've never tried keeping my dog off furniture, so I can't tell you how well that works. If she starts chewing the couch, redirect to an appropriate chew toy, and if she insists on chewing the couch, put her in a pen so she doesn't have a choice in the matter.
 

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I'm with Lilith, I allow my dogs on the furniture so I cant help with that one but in regard to your first question, what are you doing with her outside? Are you playing and she's getting amped up or are you taking her out to go potty?

I would have some toys in the yard that you can redirect her with so that she is focused on chasing a ball, playing tug of war, etc.

Remember that puppies/dogs (depending on the breed) need fair amount to a lot of exercise, make sure she is burning off that energy in a positive way and she should be a little easier to manage.
 

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I don't let my dogs on furniture. And I eat off a coffee table and have 60+ lb dogs so they can get on if they wanted. I've found that the two things that helped the most are:

1. Don't let the furniture be rewarding. This means not leaving any toys or food up there, or even restricting access if chewing the furniture is self rewarding.
This isn't forever if you do #2 below as well. I was doing a nosework game earlier and had an open bag of dog food at nose level, and my dogs chose to keep searching for their odor instead of easily jumping up for the kibble. I can leave blocks of cheese on the counter and they don't think to get it, no corrections or warnings needed (but really, step 2 is the magic for this).

2. Don't let the puppy practice the unwanted behavior, while rewarding desired behavior.
My pup was on leash in my house for the first few weeks or months. If we are eating or relaxing we put him in a crate or crate/pen setup. A lot of people will say 'but if you don't let the puppy be part of the house he'll never know how to be part of it!' In my defense, my house is so small that he is simultaneously 'in' the kitchen and main living area at all times, never more than 15 ft away from me when I am home. I also, and this is important, rewarded him for being in his appropriate spaces, doing appropriate behaviors, while I was doing my tasks. I love my results. Actually, at 8 months old tonight was his first time totally loose in the house while we were eating dinner. Again, I eat sitting on the floor so he could be a real pain in the butt if he wanted to. But I didn't have to tell him 'no' or 'leave it'... He automatically went to his area and chewed on a bone. Because that's what he's done for the last few months while we ate anything.

For couches, I had short training sessions where I would sit on a couch or chair while stepping on my pup's leash. NOT pinning him or correcting him. I step on the leash before I sit down so that he can turn around, lie down, and sit comfortably. But short enough that if he tried to jump up it wouldn't work. I also rewarded heavily for sitting, lying down, being calm, etc. Within one training session I could step off the leash, practice getting up and sitting multiple times, and pup knew that just being on the floor was the 'right answer' for those scenarios. I practiced with different chairs, sofas and benches until he generalized it.

I taught 'off' by first teaching 'up' and using treats to teach both. Yeah, I've used "off!" to get him off things I don't want him to be on in the very rare situations he does get onto something I don't want. He's still a puppy, after all. But the 'off' cue is for unplanned scenarios, not what I rely on to teach behaviors I want. As you discovered, dogs quickly learn to jump up just to be told 'off' and get a treat. Also, I want a lot of my dog's manners to be naturally offered so that I don't need to hypermanage (in the future) around furniture.

In short: If your pup doesn't get to practice a behavior (using management tools like leashes, gates, crates, pens, etc.) AND you simultaneously teach him what you want him to do in specific scenarios, by the time your pup matures a bit and you ease up on the management tools, you will get a dog who won't even think of practicing the unwanted behavior.
 

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For the biting issue.... What are you doing in the yard with her? Some puppies require more structure and management than others. I operate on a pretty extreme level in terms of management (if you can't tell by my previous post) but it's because I have a very high maintenance dog, and I am a control freak and want very specific results :)

But I ask what you're doing because some pups are not good at just "hanging out" or "casually playing". It sounds like your puppy does a very normal puppy thing, which is try to illicit the most-fun game when outside. Puppies very quickly learn that biting people and their belongings illicit the 'best' responses. I would recommend making outdoor time very structured (and still fun!), and use management for the rest. For example, take the puppy out and do 2 minutes of training (following a treat, sits, downs, easy things...), then whip out a special tug toy and play tug. Praise and reward with the odd bit of food for the tug game. Yeah, tug is its own reward. But feeding interrupts the pup and helps it calm down a little, instead of escalating and redirecting onto your hands. It also builds value for the toy instead of your hands. Run around for a bit, rewarding with the tug/treat game. Maybe slow down and start walking, rewarding with treats as puppy follows you without biting (might require rewarding every few seconds). Do all this for 15-20 minutes then put the puppy in a crate/pen/something, inside or outside (depending on where you want to relax), with some appropriate chew toys.

What puppy will learn over time is, time spent with you NOT biting you or your clothes is rewarding. And also, when you chill it's time for him to chill. At this stage the management (crate, pen, etc.) may be necessary because otherwise the pup might have zoomies and nip you in excitement. Or try to solicit attention/keep the game going when you don't want to.

When this interaction with you becomes habit and the puppy matures a bit, he won't even think of biting you because he hasn't had any reason to practice the habit.
 

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My routine:

1) let her out, she goes to bathroom;
2) train her or let her run around in the backyard;
3) regardless of which it is, after a short time she becomes VERY jumpy and bitey. She will run up and jump to either hang from my shorts or bite my legs/feet;
4) I throw the ball for her, which she can stick with for about 5-10 throws.
5) She becomes too annoying so we head in.
 

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When my golden retriever did the 'jump and bite' thing, I turned around and ignored him completely until he stopped. It took a while until he got it though.

For the furniture, other than restricting access and teaching 'down' to get her down, not sure. The only dog we trained not to jump on furniture was already 5 when we did and it only took once for him to get it (only on a specific couch).
 

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We have this exact same problem with our 10 week old Lab puppy. We cannot get her to stop jumping on us, jumping on furniture, nipping at our heels, crotch, legs, arms, fingers, etc.. We have been trying to use clickers and treats to train things like Sit, Wait, Leave It. Those three she will do readily but the Leave It command she will only stop the misbehavior until she gets a treat and then immediately does the misbehavior again, we say Leave It, she stops and sits immediately waiting for her treat, we give her a treat and a click and within two seconds she does the misbehavior again. It seems obvious that she associates getting a treat for doing the misbehavior not for stopping doing the misbehavior. And it has not made her decide not to do the misbehavior at all. We're worn out. To keep our clothes and our furniture from being ripped up and to keep her from constantly tearing at our toes, shoes, fingers, etc.., she ends up going in the playpen. I don't like leaving her in the playpen but if she is uncontrollable, I don't know what else to do. We've tried by the way to substitute treats with verbal praise or a pat on the head or belly and she still goes right back to the misbehavior. We've tried walking away and ignoring her, not giving her the "treat" of our attention and she just runs behind us and bites our heels, ankles and pulls our clothing. If I immediately stop walking, this does nothing to stop her behavior. We've tried telling her to sit and wait (stay) but she will not stay in that position forever, especially if given no treat, and so she'll sit there quietly waiting on a treat and when one isn't forthcoming, she's back to getting in trouble. We need help.
We try to give her plenty of exercise in our yard but she is usually not interested in anything but biting and jumping on us or biting, chewing and jumping on things we don't want her to bite, chew or jump on. We have TONS of fun toys for her and she rarely plays with them because they aren't as fun as biting or jumping on us or chewing expensive things. We have a playpen for her in the backyard when she gets uncontrollable and one in the house and baby gates to restrict her access to most of the house (though she is very near where we are at all times). She usually settles down in the playpen eventually but the very second we let her out, she is jumping on us and nipping at us. It never stops. The furniture she tries to jump on has absolutely nothing on it. If I try to put a leash on her and walk her, she will often just bite the leash, tie it up around her, roll around with it, walk a few steps and then stop and won't move. If i try to run with her without a leash, she of course tries to jump and nip at me. I feel like there is nothing anyone has suggested that we haven't tried and it just never gets better. My wife is almost 66 and has bad knees so it is difficult for her to try and get the puppy off her when she is sitting in a chair and the puppy comes over and pins her to the chair. This will only get worse as the puppy grows bigger and stronger. We plan on taking her to professional training but she hasn't yet had her 2nd and 3rd shots yet, and so we can't even take her to our neighbors to socialize with their puppy for another 4 weeks or something. So frustrated.
 
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