Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have two French Bulldogs. One is a male, he is 1 year old. We have a female as well, who is 5 months old. They are actually half siblings, and they have done very well with one another thus far. They play well, they sleep together, and they're both very smart dogs eager to love us as their owners.

Our male went through two levels of puppy classes, and he is trained well. The female has learned all the same commands as my male, but she hasn't been in formal classes yet.

My younger female has displayed some resource guarding behavior. Her first day home she got ahold of a raw hide, the male of course wasn't aware of what sharing meant that day.... He took it and she gave a good snarl. I wasn't in the room but I heard it from upstairs. My husband (who was there) said he had tried to pick it up to walk off.
Some time later, she had a bully stick. I needed to move her out of the doorway she was in, so I picked up the stick and she went very stiff with a snarl. I had been behind her, so it was probably a surprise to her that I took the treat. At that time, I was concerned so I began to work on positive reinforcement training with edible treats and her food bowl. I began to reinforce that if I came near, or picked up an item, or approached her bowl, that it was OK. With her bowl, if I come near she backs off and goes into a down, then I give her the OK to return. She also doesn't protest if I put my hands into her bowl. With treats its similar, she will drop it and leave it until I say OK.

I have heard her once or twice growl very slightly over things she has if our Male approaches her. It's typically over something edible, but they have tussled a bit over their plastic BeneBone chews. Sometimes theres some growling over them, but its in a much more playful fashion than in these prior instances.

And we have now had two instances that were pretty escalated with actual eating time. Both our dogs are fed a raw diet. In the morning, they usually take a bit longer to eat because they are given a raw bone with meat, it takes them longer to consume this. Since she is smaller, she always takes longer to eat than her does. One day, he must have approached her, because I was upstairs and heard a good snarl from down in the kitchen where my husband was. He had his back turned of course, so yes--from what we can tell, he approached her, and she snapped at him. This morning, I had to come near her bowl area to pick something up, and my male followed me. Admittedly, he was being a bit of a dummy. He went to sniff at her bone that she had left. He pretty much had his face right on her food and she snapped right at his face with lightning speed. It was a very fast moment, so I'm sure if she would have given him a "warning" as I might hope. But anyhow, she really went straight at him to let him know BACK OFF.

So now, I'm of course concerned. I'm obviously realistic that the male was shoving his nose where it didn't belong. And frankly, if he got that close and she reacted, she obviously has a good amount of tolerance, I know that some resource guarding dogs can't even tolerate another dog walking around within 10 feet of their bowl. It's very clear to me that an edible item is very important to her, and she's not into the sharing thing.

I'm just unsure if I need to say, okay--prevention: and feed her in a separate place from him and call it a day. Or if I should take the training approach, because I don't want to see this habit advancing to other situations or becoming more of a problem in the future. Has anyone dealt with this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
I think you have two separate issues.

As far as dog-dog RG goes, I let most of it slide if the dogs are communicating well. It's fine for one dog to say "no, this is mine" and if the other backs off, then no big deal. I won't tolerate one dog stealing everything from the other constantly, but claiming ownership of something she has is fine. If it's escalating to the point of being dangerous or starting a fight, you need to pick up anything she might guard and only give these items when they are separate. Absolutely 100% separate then while they are eating meals. I never let one dog approach the other during meals, and raw food is about the highest value item you can get.

Human RG is different and something I would definitely fix. First, stop putting your hand in her food bowl or making her back off of her food. This is making the problem worse, because you're giving her a reason to think she needs to guard food from you, because you will take it. Instead, get a super high value treat and drop it in her bowl as you walk past (or drop on the floor if you can't get that close). When she has a bully stick or other high value chewie, drop high value treats on the floor. If she's ready for it, you can trade the treat you have for the chewie she has, then give the chewie back. You want her to think that your approach means only good things will happen and that you aren't out to steal her treats from her.

Check out the book "Mine!" for the full training protocol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the thoughts on the dog-dog RG. I'm usually present in the room, and my male dog doesn't typically approach her area. I think because I had moved near her space, he was thinking that the rules were a bit different in that moment. I don't want to say they fought in that instance, but she had quite a fast, and I guess dramatic response in a flash at it. She did snap. Do you allow that? I have doubles of all the toys I get for them now, in an effort to make them enjoy their own separate toys. But of course, which ever toy one has is the exact toy that the other wants. I would spend a lot of time taking toys back from one to give to the other if I was trying to 100% prevent taking of things from each other....and like noted, with toy items, non-edibles, there is no escalation of guarding with those items.

I may not have been clear enough with the dog-human RG, I've already done positive reinforcement training with her, so she will allow me to touch her bowl, treats, or approach her space and ask her to back off without any guarding or issues. She was very responsive to that training, we only had the one incident with the bully stick, then I did treat exchanging and trades etc etc for a while, so she hasn't showed me that behavior since then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
I'll tell you what I had a behaviorist tell me in regards to my dog who is a major resource guarder. "Resource guarding towards people is one of the easiest things you can fix. You can pretty much lay down a set of guidelines and rules to follow and say 'This is the solution to your problem. Follow it exactly and it will get better.' Resource guarding towards other dogs is much harder not only because it differs fundamentally, but because training requires the cooperation of other dogs and the continued cooperation of other dogs going forward to have positive results. Dogs have a mind of their own and tend to not always want to follow the rules." In other words, resource guarding isn't something you really reliably "train" out of a dog. You just manage it and you don't give them any reason to guard. My dog is more offensive in guarding and goes after dogs who have things or are near things she doesn't want them to have instead of guarding things she actually has in her possession, so even less reliable.

So, imo, prevention is going to be the safest thing going forward for all involved. The more it's practiced the more ingrained it will become. As long as she's okay with people being around her things, which you need. Separate them during feeding and only allow her to have anything else she guards in her crate or another room the other dog is not allowed to enter. BTW, did you get her from a reputable breeder? They'll want to know about this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
I agree with DogTheGreat - you can't really train out dog-dog RG easily, because the other dog doesn't understand the protocol and isn't going to cooperate. I would only allow them to have high value items if you are able to be in the room supervising, so you can keep the male from getting too close. That may be enough, or you may need to separate them completely when they have these types of treats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
My dogs all eat together, scattered in the kitchen. If one starts being nosey and trying to see if they can get something from another dog if they finish first, then that dog will get a warning growl/snarl/baring of teeth, and possibly lunged at. But, like elrohwen said earlier, they are communicating well. It's a very clear No, this is mine. Sometimes they will get bristly backs over it, but then the nosey one goes back over to their area. Just because it looks scary or mean to me, doesn't mean it is. It never escalates, and they all pretty much know to just leave each other alone at this point. Now, if any of them would walk up to a dog who has something they want and start a fight over it, it would be an issue. But I always observe feeding time and that has yet to happen.

It's up to you how you choose to handle the situation - personally I would just try to feed them at opposite sides of the room and see if that helps. I like to let dogs be dogs unless I absolutely have to step in. I wouldn't realistically expect a dog to just give up their food or high value treat to another dog just because they wanted it. If the male is responding appropriately to her corrections then he may learn to just leave her alone. But if he is challenging her for the food, definitely need to separate them for feeding times, or have a crate to feed one of them in, at least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Without seeing exactly how your dog behaves it's hard to know what exactly to do and how to handle it.

Personally, I don't allow Cosmo to snap at other dogs for things and the reason is this:

Cosmo has always been a nosy eater. He eats quickly and will go to see if other dogs are done so he can lick up the scraps. He has stolen food from dogs and he has been snapped at. I do not tolerate him stealing from other dogs and it's something we are extremely actively working on.

Cosmo didn't always RG with food. He has been snapped at and bitten by four different dogs that I can think of off the top of my head. Keep in mind a couple of these instances were HIS food being STOLEN from HIM. After a while he started to realize that if he didn't react defensively, he would lose his snack. That's when he began snarling and snapping at other dogs. I noticed he started eating very fast and stiffly, as if he was afraid dogs would take it from him.

My BF has an older deaf dog who can't hear us say no when he steals food. It's kind of just too late to train him because he's only got a couple years left and he's deaf, and Cosmo isn't over often. They have no desire to train him, but Cosmo bit him while RGing when he stuck his nose in his bowl. He has NEVER done it with me, but to me this is unacceptable behavior.

A couple owners let their dogs get away with it, saying "well that's his treat he's just letting him know" and now my dog has behavioral issues that I don't want him pushing on other dogs. I don't want him harming smaller dogs or old dogs. I have no idea if he'd do it with children or strangers and I'm guessing he has a high chance of that happening.

This is all not okay for me. What I do is watch him, every time he eats around other dogs very closely. When a dog comes near him and he stiffens I pick up his bowl and get his attention with a firm "no". After that I IMMEDIATELY drop the bowl back in front of him. This is important so your dog doesn't think you're just stealing his food and doesn't become agitated with you. When he isn't stiff and growly when dogs are nearby I drop pieces of raw meat and high value items in his bowl.

This has worked for me, but I think consulting a professional would be good because a lot of us aren't professional and if you're working with an aggressive behavior that you dislike it's important to nip it in the bud!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Without seeing exactly how your dog behaves it's hard to know what exactly to do and how to handle it.

Personally, I don't allow Cosmo to snap at other dogs for things and the reason is this:

Cosmo has always been a nosy eater. He eats quickly and will go to see if other dogs are done so he can lick up the scraps. He has stolen food from dogs and he has been snapped at. I do not tolerate him stealing from other dogs and it's something we are extremely actively working on.

Cosmo didn't always RG with food. He has been snapped at and bitten by four different dogs that I can think of off the top of my head. Keep in mind a couple of these instances were HIS food being STOLEN from HIM. After a while he started to realize that if he didn't react defensively, he would lose his snack. That's when he began snarling and snapping at other dogs. I noticed he started eating very fast and stiffly, as if he was afraid dogs would take it from him.

My BF has an older deaf dog who can't hear us say no when he steals food. It's kind of just too late to train him because he's only got a couple years left and he's deaf, and Cosmo isn't over often. They have no desire to train him, but Cosmo bit him while RGing when he stuck his nose in his bowl. He has NEVER done it with me, but to me this is unacceptable behavior.

A couple owners let their dogs get away with it, saying "well that's his treat he's just letting him know" and now my dog has behavioral issues that I don't want him pushing on other dogs. I don't want him harming smaller dogs or old dogs. I have no idea if he'd do it with children or strangers and I'm guessing he has a high chance of that happening.

This is all not okay for me. What I do is watch him, every time he eats around other dogs very closely. When a dog comes near him and he stiffens I pick up his bowl and get his attention with a firm "no". After that I IMMEDIATELY drop the bowl back in front of him. This is important so your dog doesn't think you're just stealing his food and doesn't become agitated with you. When he isn't stiff and growly when dogs are nearby I drop pieces of raw meat and high value items in his bowl.

This has worked for me, but I think consulting a professional would be good because a lot of us aren't professional and if you're working with an aggressive behavior that you dislike it's important to nip it in the bud!
IMO, this is very bad advice. If your dog is worried that his food will be taken away when another dog approaches (hence the stiffening & faster eating) and then YOU actually follow through with **taking it AWAY** - well, his worst fears are true. Other dogs DO make food vanish.

The dog that is approaching and stealing (or even *thinking* of stealing) the food is the one that is in the wrong & needs to be "corrected". Not the dog that is simply trying to eat his OWN meal in peace.

If you don't have enough control over the multiple dogs in a residence while they are having a meal - for goodness sake! SEPARATE them!! Physically - behind closed doors or gates. There is no reason to 'correct' a dog for wanting to eat in peace. You're going to cause or exacerbate behavioral issues with such methods of training - not alleviate them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
IMO, this is very bad advice. If your dog is worried that his food will be taken away when another dog approaches (hence the stiffening & faster eating) and then YOU actually follow through with **taking it AWAY** - well, his worst fears are true. Other dogs DO make food vanish.

The dog that is approaching and stealing (or even *thinking* of stealing) the food is the one that is in the wrong & needs to be "corrected". Not the dog that is simply trying to eat his OWN meal in peace.

If you don't have enough control over the multiple dogs in a residence while they are having a meal - for goodness sake! SEPARATE them!! Physically - behind closed doors or gates. There is no reason to 'correct' a dog for wanting to eat in peace. You're going to cause or exacerbate behavioral issues with such methods of training - not alleviate them.
I disagree. If that works for you, that's great, but it does not work for me. In my house there is no aggressiveness or stealing, I do not tolerate it. When I have more dogs, I will not designate separate rooms for all of them, that's ludicrous to me. They need to learn how to behave around each other, whether that's stealing food or being aggressive with food.

My post clearly says I drop the food right back at him, so no, it does not vanish. He gets it RIGHT back, and he gets high value treats and lots of praise when he doesn't growl and snarl. So he learns that "my meal pauses when i growl, and i get more meal when i don't". Either way he gets a meal.

This was a learned behavior for Cosmo, and it's not okay to me. I won't have a small child pet him while he's chewing on a bone and end up with a bloodied hand. That will end with heartbreak and a dog in the euthanasia room. If he can't behave around other dogs, who's to say he can behave around other strangers or children? Children already make him very nervous so it's not out of the realm of possibility.

My grandpas dog, who I trained, rg'd with people. She would bite anyone who pet her while she was eating bones and meat. Not okay, so what I did was when she got those things after a couple minutes I took a racket and held the net over her food. She would snap at it, but once she relaxed i took away the racket and let her finish while tossing her a chunk of high value meat. Now she willingly gives up food because she feels it's a good thing, not that it will be eaten or stolen by me.

Anyway, this may be something some people are fine with allowing their dogs to work out, but I am not okay with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
In any case, like I said, it's probably best to consult a pro. These worked with my dogs but they may not work with your dog. It's hard to tell over the internet how it would work with your dog, and you don't want to make the problem worse, especially when it's an aggressive behavior.

EDIT: Also no, I could not control all of the dogs. Like I said, the other dog was an 11 year old deaf and going blind dog. He's a small breed, and he's not my dog. I'm not going to say "Hey can I take your dog to another room so my dog doesn't bite yours?" I'd rather just have control of my dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
IMO, this is very bad advice. If your dog is worried that his food will be taken away when another dog approaches (hence the stiffening & faster eating) and then YOU actually follow through with **taking it AWAY** - well, his worst fears are true. Other dogs DO make food vanish.

The dog that is approaching and stealing (or even *thinking* of stealing) the food is the one that is in the wrong & needs to be "corrected". Not the dog that is simply trying to eat his OWN meal in peace.

If you don't have enough control over the multiple dogs in a residence while they are having a meal - for goodness sake! SEPARATE them!! Physically - behind closed doors or gates. There is no reason to 'correct' a dog for wanting to eat in peace. You're going to cause or exacerbate behavioral issues with such methods of training - not alleviate them.
I agree with this. The nosy dog is the one causing issues, not the dog minding it's own business. If a dog is going toward another dog while eating, it's okay in my opinion for the other dog to correct that dog - just like they do in play, when one gets too rough or the other has had enough, etc. If I had a dog who didn't learn from these corrections and put himself at risk, that dog would be crated. I think issues arise when owners don't read the situation and let it get to the point that the nosy dog then associates meal time/treats with always trying to steal and negative consequences. That is a dog that isn't communicating and that's when intervention is needed.

To me, dog-dog resource guarding is an issue when a dog will be just standing/laying around, sees a dog going for a toy or bowl or whatever, and then guards that object. I've seen this with dogs at the park who guard the water bowl - not when they are drinking from it, but just to keep the other dogs from drinking from it in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
I'm not saying to let the dogs "work it out". What I'm saying is that it is the *human's* responsibility to protect a dog from others stealing his food - then the dog can learn that he has no need to protect it himself. Management & preventing other dogs from hovering & stealing is what I am advocating.

You seen to think that growling is inherently "wrong", and nothing could be further from the truth. A growl is simply a dog's way of communicating displeasure. Sure- you can punish out the growl, but if you don't work to resolve the underlying fear/frustration then you simply are removing the dog's warning & could potentially end up with a dog that bites/attacks 'out of the blue'. Taking a dog's food away (however briefly) or covering it with a racket?? might have worked in your case, but for the vast majority of RG issues these sort of heavy-handed techniques will lead to an *increase* in guarding behavior, or a reduction in warning - but an increase in frustration (which could lead to increased aggressive reaction in the long run)

Suggesting someone take away a dog's meal to 'fix' RG is (IMO) dangerous advice. Consulting a pro - that I will agree with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I agree with this. The nosy dog is the one causing issues, not the dog minding it's own business. If a dog is going toward another dog while eating, it's okay in my opinion for the other dog to correct that dog - just like they do in play, when one gets too rough or the other has had enough, etc. If I had a dog who didn't learn from these corrections and put himself at risk, that dog would be crated. I think issues arise when owners don't read the situation and let it get to the point that the nosy dog then associates meal time/treats with always trying to steal and negative consequences. That is a dog that isn't communicating and that's when intervention is needed.

To me, dog-dog resource guarding is an issue when a dog will be just standing/laying around, sees a dog going for a toy or bowl or whatever, and then guards that object. I've seen this with dogs at the park who guard the water bowl - not when they are drinking from it, but just to keep the other dogs from drinking from it in general.
I understand completely that his dog was the one that created the problem, but I don't want my dog escalating it. He doesn't need to give up his meal, my goal is to get him to share and be okay with another dog eating out of his bowl. Not that I ever intend for two of my dogs to be eating out of the same bowl because that's asking for trouble, but because IF IT HAPPENS I don't want to be responsible for someone else's vet or hospital bill because my dog flipped, and I don't want my dog responsible for an action that he either learned or is natural. The consequences could be deadly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
I understand completely that his dog was the one that created the problem, but I don't want my dog escalating it. He doesn't need to give up his meal, my goal is to get him to share and be okay with another dog eating out of his bowl. Not that I ever intend for two of my dogs to be eating out of the same bowl because that's asking for trouble, but because IF IT HAPPENS I don't want to be responsible for someone else's vet or hospital bill because my dog flipped, and I don't want my dog responsible for an action that he either learned or is natural. The consequences could be deadly.
To expect your dog to "share" happily with another dog eating out of his bowl is an unrealistic goal, and heavily anthropomorphic. If you can't control all the other dogs in the vicinity at mealtime, why not simply confine YOUR dog to his own crate so the problem wouldn't even be able to arise? What you are proposing is unnatural canine behavior. You might be able to 'train' it - but long term, it isn't going to stay that way. Let your guard down, and the original - natural & normal - behavior will again rise up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I'm not saying to let the dogs "work it out". What I'm saying is that it is the *human's* responsibility to protect a dog from others stealing his food - then the dog can learn that he has no need to protect it himself. Management & preventing other dogs from hovering & stealing is what I am advocating.

You seen to think that growling is inherently "wrong", and nothing could be further from the truth. A growl is simply a dog's way of communicating displeasure. Sure- you can punish out the growl, but if you don't work to resolve the underlying fear/frustration then you simply are removing the dog's warning & could potentially end up with a dog that bites/attacks 'out of the blue'. Taking a dog's food away (however briefly) or covering it with a racket?? might have worked in your case, but for the vast majority of RG issues these sort of heavy-handed techniques will lead to an *increase* in guarding behavior, or a reduction in warning - but an increase in frustration (which could lead to increased aggressive reaction in the long run)

Suggesting someone take away a dog's meal to 'fix' RG is (IMO) dangerous advice. Consulting a pro - that I will agree with.
Accidents happen, and I cannot prevent all accidents from happening. It IS my job to prevent it, I agree, but it's also my job to train Cosmo the right way to behave and react, and acceptable ways to behave and react. That behavior is UNACCEPTABLE to me. It may not be for you, but for me it is, and the OP clearly doesn't like the behavior her female is showing towards her male so I was giving what worked for me and my opinions.

I understand growling is a VERY important warning signal - I didn't even need to read the rest of your paragraph to know that's where you were going with that. I'm not training out the growl I'm training out the defensive behavior. This doesn't make sense because you're all for training for RG towards people - but the dog would still growl if it were towards a person and you would still train the dog. So I don't understand what you're talking about, I can still get the outcome I want. I understand dogs growl to communicate, it's GUARDING that I don't like, not growling. Cosmo growls when dogs hump him. That's fine. Cosmo growls when dogs get to rough or he gets fed up. That's fine. Cosmo growls when a dog comes near his bowl. That's not okay because in this situation he's guarding.

LIKE I SAID MULTIPLE TIMES: CONSULT A PRO. THIS WORKED WITH MY DOG BUT IM NOT A PROFESSIONAL. YOU DONT WANT IT GETTING WORSE. I've said all of these things several times.

I GOT THESE TIPS FROM MY LOCAL TRAINERS BUT THEY HELPED MY WITH MY SPECIFIC DOG AND THEIR SPECIFIC BEHAVIORS. I was just giving what worked and explaining why I, personally, don't tolerate guarding in any situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Um? Wednesday is three and happily shares.(My grandpa's dog) She doesn't guard and not all dogs guard. We trained it out of her at 7 months old. She will still "share" as in eat near dogs or around dogs. It doesn't have to be a bowl, it could be the floor. It's not unrealistic to get dogs to gladly eat together in a group and it's not unheard of. She is left with other well behaved dogs all the time (my grandparents travel and leave her in a house with three other dogs) and they have no issues with food. They all eat in the same kitchen and the newer one which is a Husky mix is a scavenger and will sniff their bowls and come near them but doesn't stick her nose in the bowls. None of the dogs growl or snap at her for being near the bowls. There are several "unnatural" canine behaviors people train their dogs like sit stay that a "natural" ? dog wouldn't do. It's about training. Not really sure what you mean by that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Um? Wednesday is three and happily shares.(My grandpa's dog) She doesn't guard and not all dogs guard. We trained it out of her at 7 months old. She will still "share" as in eat near dogs or around dogs. It doesn't have to be a bowl, it could be the floor. It's not unrealistic to get dogs to gladly eat together in a group and it's not unheard of. She is left with other well behaved dogs all the time (my grandparents travel and leave her in a house with three other dogs) and they have no issues with food. They all eat in the same kitchen and the newer one which is a Husky mix is a scavenger and will sniff their bowls and come near them but doesn't stick her nose in the bowls. None of the dogs growl or snap at her for being near the bowls. There are several "unnatural" canine behaviors people train their dogs like sit stay that a "natural" ? dog wouldn't do. It's about training. Not really sure what you mean by that.
It's late, and I have explained my position as clearly as I can. I'm sorry if you're not understanding what I'm trying to say. For the final time -

Guarding of valuable resources is a natural & normal canine behavior. Many (most?) dogs find food a valuable enough resource to guard - but definitely not all of them do. Some guard toys, space, people, trash they find on the street, etc... Some guard not much of anything. Training can help when guarding causes issues to arise, but the bottom line is this: It is the dog that is stealing/hovering or being a nosey Nelly & sticking their face in another dog's bowl that is the one in need of the training. Not the one just trying to eat in peace. When you train the one stealing, then the guarder no longer will feel the need to have to guard, so it's a win-win. Dogs that live together & all have a respectful relationship can & will eat peacefully in close proximity to each other. Throw a random strange dog into the room, allow him to shove a nosey nose into someone else's food bowl, and... well, I'm not so sure peace would reign supreme.

And now I'm all typed out on this subject for the evening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,145 Posts
Expecting a resource guarder to learn to "share" is an unfair and unrealistic goal.

After a while he started to realize that if he didn't react defensively, he would lose his snack. That's when he began snarling and snapping at other dogs. I noticed he started eating very fast and stiffly, as if he was afraid dogs would take it from him.
He IS. Resource guarding at its heart is a fear/anxiety related behavior - the fear that someone is going to take away your stuff. You're not teaching your dog that it is "unacceptable" to resource guard when you take away his stuff. You're just removing the resource being guarded and possibly teaching him an association that guarding against another dog makes his food go away.

It can be effective in some circumstances. I did a similar thing with a previous dog who would resource our meals against the cats. If she lip lifted or growled, she had to go lay on a mat across the room. RG behavior = resource goes away, the opposite of what you want. It CAN be effective, but I would have never, ever expected her to allow the cats to approach her while she was eating HER meals. They were all separated at mealtimes. Everyone has a right to eat their own meal in peace, I've never understood the insistence that dogs should allow pestering by anyone during their own meal.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top