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I have a 5 month German Shepherd puppy, she always picks up the ball and drops it infront of me when I'm outside. So I throw it and she goes to fetch it, she LOVES chew toys and 'fetching' but she does not bring it back. I've tried luring her with a treat, but she doesn't care about food when she has her ball. She is a very smart pup, but that seems to be her only problem. She knows how to sit, laydown, come(sometimes), go through tube, jump over bar, shake paw and crawl under bar.

One more thing, how could I get her to like water? I want her to be like those dogs that jump in the lake to fetch xD She is going to be big someday!
 

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Not all dogs like playing in water. It's a personal preference, and you can't make a dog like something they don't. You might wade in and see if she'll follow you. For the retrieving - two balls. If she doesn't want to bring the first one back, pay great attention to the second ball (it's the most wonderful ball in the world) and only throw it when she drops the first one. Then gradually wait for her to bring it closer before you throw.
 

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Yes, the two-toy or two-ball method is good.

She knows how to sit, laydown, come(sometimes) , go through tube, jump over bar, shake paw and crawl under bar.
Related to the above quote, strengthening her recall as a totally seperate excercise might help with her fetch issues.

Also, try putting more value in the general front position, close to you. You can use a clicker and treats for this, basically.

If you're expectations are that she should return the ball to hand, then you could 'backchain' the behaviour. If you're unfamiliar with this term, do a forum search.

A couple of other things to bear in mind ...

Give the dog ample reason to actually bring it back to you. Tug can be a good way to accomplish this, thereby increasing your inclusion in the game. Ie: rope toys, and braided cloth 'snakes' etc are usually more appropriate, rather than balls (for obvious reasons). You should also teach an "out". So, ultimately, the sequence might look something like -- tug > out > sit > throw > call to front > tug > out > sit > throw, -- etc.

Be aware of where your focal point is. Some dogs are sensitive to being looked at by the handler as they come back, and may react by dropping the ball/toy early or by diverting away from you. If this is a factor, then I suggest looking at the ground between your feet or thereabouts, while she is returning.

For swimming. A very gradual incline (decline?) at a calm beach or similar area is best. Wade backwards into the water only to the point where her feet can theoretically no longer touch bottom, and playfully encourage her in .. if she follows you in .. praise profusely, immediately circle around, exit the water, praise again, perhaps play some tug on the shoreline, and call it a day for the time being. Next outing you could maybe try two ventures into the water, as described ... and so on. The retrieve component can be added into the mix at a later date, once she is entirely comfortable with the concept of swimming.
 

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Train fetch in increments. If he makes any move towards you at all, click it. Then just keep slowly raising the bar until he's returning to you. That's what I did with kabota. Oddly, I gave up on fetch because he didn't seem to enjoy it much, then last week, out of nowhere, he started fetching on his own. We've played fetch every day since.

As to water, kabota loves it, my old dog would curl up like a dead spider at one raindrop. It's just an individual dog thing.
 

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Yes, the two-toy or two-ball method is good.



Related to the above quote, strengthening her recall as a totally seperate excercise might help with her fetch issues.

Also, try putting more value in the general front position, close to you. You can use a clicker and treats for this, basically.

If you're expectations are that she should return the ball to hand, then you could 'backchain' the behaviour. If you're unfamiliar with this term, do a forum search.

A couple of other things to bear in mind ...

Give the dog ample reason to actually bring it back to you. Tug can be a good way to accomplish this, thereby increasing your inclusion in the game. Ie: rope toys, and braided cloth 'snakes' etc are usually more appropriate, rather than balls (for obvious reasons). You should also teach an "out". So, ultimately, the sequence might look something like -- tug > out > sit > throw > call to front > tug > out > sit > throw, -- etc.

Be aware of where your focal point is. Some dogs are sensitive to being looked at by the handler as they come back, and may react by dropping the ball/toy early or by diverting away from you. If this is a factor, then I suggest looking at the ground between your feet or thereabouts, while she is returning.

For swimming. A very gradual incline (decline?) at a calm beach or similar area is best. Wade backwards into the water only to the point where her feet can theoretically no longer touch bottom, and playfully encourage her in .. if she follows you in .. praise profusely, immediately circle around, exit the water, praise again, perhaps play some tug on the shoreline, and call it a day for the time being. Next outing you could maybe try two ventures into the water, as described ... and so on. The retrieve component can be added into the mix at a later date, once she is entirely comfortable with the concept of swimming.
Yeah why is that? My Josefina does this if I look st her while she is retrieving ... ONLY while she is coming back, she will give a 'hard' stare & drop it early, if I don't look at her she brings it all he way back. I h e Lways been very benign & positive when playing & never been harsh with her.
 

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I'm not sure why that occurs with some dogs, so I don't really have a clear-cut definitive answer for you.

Perhaps they perceive it as a challenge by the handler. Or they are sensitive to social pressure. Hard to say. Personally, I don't appreciate being stared at while I'm learning a new task.

This can easily be seen in young dogs while trying to teach them an informal puppy retrieve. Look directly at them and they will likely veer away. However, crouching on the floor keeping your head down and rump up in somewhat of a play posture, and looking at the spot where you're expecting them to be, seems to be the ticket to lessen some of the pressure for these youngsters. And they usually respond accordingly.

This same basic premise of focal point appears to hold true with the older dogs as well. I believe, oftentimes, dogs just simply want to be where you're looking because it's a beneficial place. Magical ? lol
 
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