Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My puppy Australian Shepherd (9-10 months now) starts to act weird since yesterday. He seems to be scared of something so he stays in the kennel. He wouldn’t come out of the kennel even calling him to come out. He is very inactive in the house. Usually he’d find things to do such as chewing on his toys or exploring. When he goes out to the door area, he is fine. He does his usual exploring then chews on grass -_- but at least he is normal.

What I did a few moments ago was put a small bit of treat in his kennel, then some outside of the kennel. I lined them up so that they led to the treat dispenser (one of his favorite toys that can keep him occupied for a long time). He only ate the treat in the kennel. He would NOT step out of the kennel even if I try to call him out. I also tried to get out of his sight, but he still won’t come out.

Here are some things that I noticed
Last couple days, downstairs neighbors have been blasting music, so loud that we could feel the bump for couple hours a day.

A few days ago puppy made some funny sounds when sleeping. I assumed that he was just having nightmare or something.

He peed 2-3 times in the apartment (he stopped doing that for a while now) and now that habit came back occasionally.

He barks very loud and long when there are people at the door. We trained him to bark 0-1 times depending on the people (if it is us, he didn’t bark. If other people, he’d bark once). Now his long loud barking is back.

So… my questions are
Is he sick? Is he scared of something? Or is he getting into his 2nd fear stage?

Please advise I am really worried =( thank you in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
I don't really understand the big problem. It might just be that the dog really enjoys chilling out in the kennel. Either that or something scary happened when he got out of the kennel one time and now he's learned it may be dangerous to step outside.

For the peeing problem, housetraining needs to be revisited. The peeing may be caused by some illness as well.

How did you teach the dog to bark 0-1 times?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I don't really understand the big problem. It might just be that the dog really enjoys chilling out in the kennel.
Very true. Other than the peeing, not seeing an issue. Mine actually put themselves in the kennel to get away from it all for a while. Kind of like a teenager going to their room for a little me time. I think you did a good job at making the kennel a safe place. Also no offence intended he might be just going in there to get away from you. They do that sometimes, they just need to have some alone time. Mine will do that to me as well especially when I am home on the weekends. I like to pet them and play and when they lay down to sleep I might pet them. So if they are not into being all nice and cuddly they just go into their kennel to get away for a nap. Puppies change as they get older. He also might be more in a rebelliousness stage testing his independence. It is a little late in the general guides for puppies but still possible.

He could be sick, but you would have other signs like loose stools etc. It could be the extra noise as well. Kind of like holiday times wear down pets as well with all the activity. As far as barking, dogs will be dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I don't really understand the big problem. It might just be that the dog really enjoys chilling out in the kennel. Either that or something scary happened when he got out of the kennel one time and now he's learned it may be dangerous to step outside.

For the peeing problem, housetraining needs to be revisited. The peeing may be caused by some illness as well.

How did you teach the dog to bark 0-1 times?
Agreed. And you trained him to bark?! So your are re-enforcing bad behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Agreed. And you trained him to bark?! So your are re-enforcing bad behavior.
For barky dogs, it's good to teach them barking stimulus control. Instead of just being a habitual barker, you can put barking on cue and start/stop it. They do this with chemical sniffing dogs, where if they smell something they bark. It's a good practice, but putting barking under stimulus control also takes a lot of training skill, so to be successful at it is difficult.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top