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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I started fostering a lovely puppy over a month ago for a rescue group in Los Angeles that takes in strays and small pets at kill shelters. They have a very small set up, and it's basically run by a few volunteers (extremely understaffed). The puppy was doing great at my house for the first month. Very happy and very spoiled with attention and care. Out of the blue over these past 7 days, she's been developing these sores all over her body. I brought her in immediately when she just had 2 small sores at the start, and the vet tech they had on staff did a quick 30 second ring worm test. She told me it was negative for ringworm and informed to just spray some hydrogen peroxide on her and it should go away. Next day, she developed more sores, then even more the next day. I updated the rescue each day. I brought her in again to leave her there for a few days so they could monitor her. They texted me that everything was fine and for me to pick her up. When I got there today, her paws/legs, whiskers/chin, and belly had even more sores. I told this to the vet tech. She told me it's not contagious, and it's probably just allergies and her body will fight it off and recover. She told me if its a problem, I could rub neosporin on the sores.

I'm nervous because after a month of searching for people to adopt her, I finally found 2 families that were interested in meeting her. However, she now looks diseased and I'm scared it's going to hurt her chances of getting adopted. I'm thinking about rescheduling the meeting until the sores heal up, but I'm also worried they will just look elsewhere or the sores will continue to get worse. I'm also nervous that the vet tech didn't really give a thorough examination and only checked for ring worms. She didn't inform me that the puppy had developed more sores while in their care. I really don't have the means to take her to another vet for a second opinion which is why I'm fostering. I don't know what to do and I feel helpless.

More info: The week prior, I took her to a highly rated pet salon to bathe her and treat her shedding (I paid out of pocket). I washed her bed and blankets. She hunted and killed a squirrel in the backyard. I told all this to the rescue incase it might have given them an answer.
What should I do?

TL;DR; Foster puppy developing sores all over. The rescue I got her from seems to be dismissive and not alarmed by the sores.
 

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Did the sores develop before or after the grooming? If after, I would suspect a reaction to some product they used on her.

You might need to bite the bullet, and pay out of pocket to get a second opinion from another vet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did the sores develop before or after the grooming? If after, I would suspect a reaction to some product they used on her.

You might need to bite the bullet, and pay out of pocket to get a second opinion from another vet.
It was after the grooming. I just brought her back from the vet from the rescue. Should I wait a bit?
 

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I'd get a second opinion for sure. I'm also very concerned that the vet suggested hydrogen peroxide, which is no longer used as a wound disinfectant in human medicine because it can damage healthy tissue, and Neosporin, which should not be ingested and is therefore not typically considered dog-safe. I am not a vet, so there may be a reason they suggested those in particular for this dog, but I'd definitely want a second opinion and a more precise diagnosis. I'd be calling around to other vets to at least ask whether it's advisable to go ahead with the suggested treatments.
 

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All love to vet techs, who do hard emotional and physical work at a terribly underpaid rate, but I agree with DaySleepers. I'd make an appointment with an actual vet, preferably at a practice that lists dermatology as one of their specialties.
 

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I know it's hard when you're just fostering for a rescue, and it's not really your dog. I did rescue and fostered for over 10 years. You might try calling whoever is responsible at the rescue and really laying it on them - the puppy is covered in sores, she's miserable, you're miserable, and no one's going to adopt her unless something is done. Tell them their vet has blown you off and you didn't even see a vet but a tech. Vets who do rescue work are angels in many ways, but some also don't give the same standard of care that they do to customers who pay full rates. Agitate for support to take her to a different vet, and a vet specializing in dermatology would be best. My own experience is that specialists don't cost any more for an initial visit and assessment (although they'd cost more than a vet who has contracted with a rescue for reduced cost services), and they almost always save you money in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I know it's hard when you're just fostering for a rescue, and it's not really your dog. I did rescue and fostered for over 10 years. You might try calling whoever is responsible at the rescue and really laying it on them - the puppy is covered in sores, she's miserable, you're miserable, and no one's going to adopt her unless something is done. Tell them their vet has blown you off and you didn't even see a vet but a tech. Vets who do rescue work are angels in many ways, but some also don't give the same standard of care that they do to customers who pay full rates. Agitate for support to take her to a different vet, and a vet specializing in dermatology would be best. My own experience is that specialists don't cost any more for an initial visit and assessment (although they'd cost more than a vet who has contracted with a rescue for reduced cost services), and they almost always save you money in the long run.
Thank you! It's tough. I decided to foster because I don't really have the means to own a dog right now for reasons such as this (taking them to vets and stuff). I was told before I decided to foster that all medical needs would be met at the rescue and they'd provide medication if necessary. I've brought up this issue to them 5 times now (plus the time I brought her back and left the puppy in their care) and its just getting worse and worse each day. The tech says it's nothing serious, but the puppy looks very diseased and I don't think I can find someone to adopt her the way she's looking now. The rescue basically told me I could just return the puppy to them, but it's obvious they won't do anything more. I was also told that after I dropped the puppy back to them for a few days for monitoring, the puppy was extremely depressed, crying all day, and not eating. She's so happy when she's at my home though. I don't know what to do. I feel like the rescue just dropped this puppy off on me.
 

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I am so sorry. It sounds like you really have some hard decisions to make. Press the rescue people as hard as you can - why are they claiming to rescue if they don't care enough to address a problem like this?
 

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I'm so sorry the rescue's put you in this position. It's awful and inexcusable, imo. There's no point in taking in dogs from kill shelters if they're not willing to put in the effort and expense to make sure they're happy, healthy, and have good quality of life while waiting for a permanent home.

If you're still considering calling around to other vets, I'd be totally up-front with the situation and your financial limitations. Ask if they can provide you cost estimates ahead of time, and/or if they can recommend any reduced cost veterinary services or financial aid options in your area. You absolutely shouldn't have to be pulling from out of pocket for this, and it's totally understandable if you just can't make that work. That's not what you signed up for as a foster, I just wanted to offer some suggestions so you can make whatever choice is best for this crummy situation.

Keep us updated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm so sorry the rescue's put you in this position. It's awful and inexcusable, imo. There's no point in taking in dogs from kill shelters if they're not willing to put in the effort and expense to make sure they're happy, healthy, and have good quality of life while waiting for a permanent home.

If you're still considering calling around to other vets, I'd be totally up-front with the situation and your financial limitations. Ask if they can provide you cost estimates ahead of time, and/or if they can recommend any reduced cost veterinary services or financial aid options in your area. You absolutely shouldn't have to be pulling from out of pocket for this, and it's totally understandable if you just can't make that work. That's not what you signed up for as a foster, I just wanted to offer some suggestions so you can make whatever choice is best for this crummy situation.

Keep us updated.
I basically pressed the rescue and told them the puppy already lost a very interested adopter and if she continues to look even worse, she's never going to get adopted. They finally told me to they'd take her to the vet, but then there was some miscommunication on their part, and they messed the vet appointment. They then gave me a bottle of antibiotics to give her (without diagnosing her). I don't know what to do.
 
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