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Hello,
I am going to apologize right off the bat for starting a new thread. I hope no-one minds.
My 18 year old daughter who has mental health issues and gets ideas in her head that she can do whatever she wants bought an 8 week old 'Goberian' which is half Husky half Golden Retriever.
We also have a middle age cat, and one issue is that the pup wants the cat to play so the pup jumps on top of the cat. Anyone know how I stop that or discourage it?
Second, I read that positive discipline works best, but when pup is being really out of control, like biting the sofa, or chewing shoelaces, how do you discipline pup? Surely at times, you have to be firm with them so they know its not acceptable behavior?
How much time should I spend training her at the moment? I have no idea what a decent daily schedule looks like.
Lastly, we didn't bring this adorable animal in our home. Our daughter did. We are considering whether we have to give it to someone else who has more time. Is this best done sooner rather than later if that's what we decide?
I'm sorry. I'm just a novice at this and I want this dog to have the best start in life.
Thanks in advance!
 

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A Husky/Golden is going to be a handful...fair warning. If you want to return the puppy, yes, it is better to do it while they're younger. You're looking at 2-3 years until you have a mature dog. That's about a year of very puppy-like behaviors such as destructive chewing, mouthing, and what I call "temporary loss of brain function." Like, moody teenager loss of brain function.

Positive Reinforcement is actually what works best. Basically, it means you reward good behavior, prevent bad behavior. It's force free and relies on the fact that you control the dog's resources: food, outside time, toys, everything. You have what the dog wants, so you can teach him to do what you want to attain those resources. If the puppy is chewing on inappropriate items, redirect to an appropriate toy and praise the pup for using it. Always supervise the puppy, and when you can't, he should be crated. If the puppy is biting you (which is a normal puppy behavior that you can expect a lot of from these breeds) also redirect to a toy, and if the puppy still insists on biting you, get up and leave the puppy for a minute or so. The puppy will learn that biting = happy fun play with humans time is over.

Basic manners training is kind of an ongoing chore for the next year, really. You know, no mouthing (the "get up and leave" method I just described above), no counter surfing, things like that. Most of that is about prevention in the first place (so, crating when you can't supervise so they can't chew furniture, picking up your house, keeping food off the counters) and redirecting and rewarding for the behaviors you do want. The basic obedience, like sit, down, stay, you'll probably only get 5 minutes at this point in time. As they get older, their attentions span increases. I only spend about 15 minutes actually training obedience behaviors to my adult dog, because any longer and we both get bored.
 

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A Husky/Golden is going to be a handful...fair warning. If you want to return the puppy, yes, it is better to do it while they're younger. You're looking at 2-3 years until you have a mature dog. That's about a year of very puppy-like behaviors such as destructive chewing, mouthing, and what I call "temporary loss of brain function." Like, moody teenager loss of brain function.

Positive Reinforcement is actually what works best. Basically, it means you reward good behavior, prevent bad behavior. It's force free and relies on the fact that you control the dog's resources: food, outside time, toys, everything. You have what the dog wants, so you can teach him to do what you want to attain those resources. If the puppy is chewing on inappropriate items, redirect to an appropriate toy and praise the pup for using it. Always supervise the puppy, and when you can't, he should be crated. If the puppy is biting you (which is a normal puppy behavior that you can expect a lot of from these breeds) also redirect to a toy, and if the puppy still insists on biting you, get up and leave the puppy for a minute or so. The puppy will learn that biting = happy fun play with humans time is over.

Basic manners training is kind of an ongoing chore for the next year, really. You know, no mouthing (the "get up and leave" method I just described above), no counter surfing, things like that. Most of that is about prevention in the first place (so, crating when you can't supervise so they can't chew furniture, picking up your house, keeping food off the counters) and redirecting and rewarding for the behaviors you do want. The basic obedience, like sit, down, stay, you'll probably only get 5 minutes at this point in time. As they get older, their attentions span increases. I only spend about 15 minutes actually training obedience behaviors to my adult dog, because any longer and we both get bored.
Thank you SO much! Is it possible to keep this pup if both of us work? I would be out from about 7.45-4pm every day. My other worry is if we pass the dog on, I don't know how to ensure she goes to a good home. My work colleague and friend wants the dog, but her family is busy like me, so I don't see how on earth she'd do a better job with the pup. I'm anxiety ridden over this pup. Because she brought it without asking, we were not prepared for it, so we don't have a space for the dog fenced off, so she's wandering round, and as a result we aren't getting the potty training consistent.
I'm devastated because I'd love to keep it but am worried I'm not doing it right and this dog is not ideal for a puppy novice.
Thanks for taking to the time to respond. I appreciate it!
 

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Thank you SO much! Is it possible to keep this pup if both of us work? I would be out from about 7.45-4pm every day. My other worry is if we pass the dog on, I don't know how to ensure she goes to a good home. My work colleague and friend wants the dog, but her family is busy like me, so I don't see how on earth she'd do a better job with the pup. I'm anxiety ridden over this pup. Because she brought it without asking, we were not prepared for it, so we don't have a space for the dog fenced off, so she's wandering round, and as a result we aren't getting the potty training consistent.
I'm devastated because I'd love to keep it but am worried I'm not doing it right and this dog is not ideal for a puppy novice.
Thanks for taking to the time to respond. I appreciate it!
Many people (including myself) have a dog and work full time. Most dogs can hold it a full work day as adults (so, 8-9 hours about). As baby puppies, they can hold it in their crate for maybe 4 hours, so you would probably have to offer them a break at midday, or attach an x-pen to the crate with potty pads put down until they grow up a bit and their bladder develops. Potty training will take a bit longer with the last method, but sometimes its what you have to do if you can't get someone to give them a break halfway through.

If I were you, the first things that I would go out and buy is a crate, x-pen, food/water dishes, Kong, some other toys, potty pads, leash, collar, and obviously food and treats. It's a hefty investment.

Also, do you know where this pup came from? If you don't know, I would recommend scheduling a vet visit at once to get the pup started on her vaccinations and a general wellness check.

If you truly want to keep it, go for it, but remember that you have to be truly invested in the pup's wellbeing! Puppy ownership is hard! That cute little thing can become a landshark bent on destroying your whole house for a few months! If you decide to rehome, I would first ask the breeder to take it back. Since your daughter was hastily able to attain this pup, I'm kinda doubting the breeder is reputable, but it's worth a shot. Personally, I would surrender the pup to a rescue and explain your unique situation. I'm sure they would understand. Rescues are pretty good about being able to vet new owners, and the pup will go very quickly. Everyone wants a puppy (although I have not idea why, lol)!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
YES! I sure do! But I'm from the UK and we don't crate train pups, so I have zero idea when to put pup in the crate, or for how long. I have no idea fo what a great daily schedule looks like for a pup. She does go in the crate overnight to sleep and is happy in it. Any advice welcomed!

Do you have a large crate for the dog so you can crate train and potty train?
YES! I sure do! But I'm from the UK and we don't crate train pups, so I have zero idea when to put pup in the crate, or for how long. I have no idea of what a great daily schedule looks like for a pup. She does go in the crate overnight to sleep and is happy in it. Any advice welcomed!
 

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Many people (including myself) have a dog and work full time. Most dogs can hold it a full work day as adults (so, 8-9 hours about). As baby puppies, they can hold it in their crate for maybe 4 hours, so you would probably have to offer them a break at midday, or attach an x-pen to the crate with potty pads put down until they grow up a bit and their bladder develops. Potty training will take a bit longer with the last method, but sometimes its what you have to do if you can't get someone to give them a break halfway through.

If I were you, the first things that I would go out and buy is a crate, x-pen, food/water dishes, Kong, some other toys, potty pads, leash, collar, and obviously food and treats. It's a hefty investment.

Also, do you know where this pup came from? If you don't know, I would recommend scheduling a vet visit at once to get the pup started on her vaccinations and a general wellness check.

If you truly want to keep it, go for it, but remember that you have to be truly invested in the pup's wellbeing! Puppy ownership is hard! That cute little thing can become a landshark bent on destroying your whole house for a few months! If you decide to rehome, I would first ask the breeder to take it back. Since your daughter was hastily able to attain this pup, I'm kinda doubting the breeder is reputable, but it's worth a shot. Personally, I would surrender the pup to a rescue and explain your unique situation. I'm sure they would understand. Rescues are pretty good about being able to vet new owners, and the pup will go very quickly. Everyone wants a puppy (although I have not idea why, lol)!

Thanks again!
I do want to keep her because I am attached to her now, BUT, I just got home at 11pm tonight. Dog was in her crate, so I took her out to let her go potty. She did great and peed and pooped, then I let her stay downstairs and she was calmly playing with her toys, but then suddenly she began attacking the cat who was chilling on the sofa, and I said NO, and went to get her, but she obviously thought this was a game, and started running awa from me, then was running full speed all over the place. I took her and put her back in her upstairs crate she sleeps in and she was whining a little as I left her, but this is what worries me. That pup was out of control just then and I had no idea what to do. Ugh. I jsut want to be a good, responsible dog owner! I don't know who would want a pup either. Not me. If I'd chosen, I'd have rescued an older dog. This is a HUGE responsibility, and I can see this pup has attitude already.
 

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The puppy is being a puppy. The running around like a nut it's called zoomies, just getting energy burned off. Usually I just let her run and then mine calms down. Just be sure they can't run into something and get hurt. Sounds like it does fine in the crate and out for potties. I had a schedule when mine was little because I still worked. I had her up at 3am for pottie and out of the crate until I left at 4am. Then back to the crate. My husband let her out again at 6am for breakfast and potties then back to the crate. Then out at noon for lunch and pottie and back to the crate until I got home at 3:30pm. Then she was out of the crate for potties, playing and dinner and potties then back in at 9pm. And started all over again, that went on from 10 weeks to about 4mths old. Then one day at 3am she came out of her crate and went all be herself out the dog door to pottie. So we started leaving the crate door open at night. I then was out of town for almost two months and my husband started only closing her in the crate when he left to go somewhere, which we still do now. I have since retired but she's all trained now!! I don't have any info on how to train with pee pee pads and a pen, sorry.
 

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The puppy is being a puppy. The running around like a nut it's called zoomies, just getting energy burned off. Usually I just let her run and then mine calms down. Just be sure they can't run into something and get hurt. Sounds like it does fine in the crate and out for potties. I had a schedule when mine was little because I still worked. I had her up at 3am for pottie and out of the crate until I left at 4am. Then back to the crate. My husband let her out again at 6am for breakfast and potties then back to the crate. Then out at noon for lunch and pottie and back to the crate until I got home at 3:30pm. Then she was out of the crate for potties, playing and dinner and potties then back in at 9pm. And started all over again, that went on from 10 weeks to about 4mths old. Then one day at 3am she came out of her crate and went all be herself out the dog door to pottie. So we started leaving the crate door open at night. I then was out of town for almost two months and my husband started only closing her in the crate when he left to go somewhere, which we still do now. I have since retired but she's all trained now!! I don't have any info on how to train with pee pee pads and a pen, sorry.

Thank you! That was very helpful. Basically I feel like a clueless first time mother with a newborn, so I'm guessing I'm asking daft questions, but it comes from em making sure I'm not ruining this poor puppy. Thanks for the outline of the schedule for your pup. That helps such a lot because I'm a person who needs to see or hear what good practice is, then I can replicate it. Without an idea of what to do I'm lost! Thanks so much!
 

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No worries, hope it helps. Oh I did have the nights when it was like an infant, out for pottie every hour or two when mine had stomach issues but that stooped after about a week when the vet put her on a special diet, Boston's have stomach issues, just one of those things. Mine is 17 months now and still has zoomies!! I'm sure someone has info on pee pad training that can help. Attach a picture of your new addition when you can!!
 

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No worries, hope it helps. Oh I did have three nights when it was like an infant, out for pottie every hour or two when mine had stomach issues but that stooped after about a week when the vet put her on a special diet, Boston's have stomach issues, just one of those things. Mine is 17 months now and still has zoomies!! I'm sure someone has info on pee pad training that can help. Attach a picture of your new addition when you can!!
http://www.dogforums.com/asset.php?fid=195641&uid=293249&d=1504995722

IMG_4991.jpg


Hoping that is a picture of Isla. Thanks for the advice! Right now it's stopping her attacking the cat (she thinks its a game) and stopping her biting stuff she shouldn't be. This is hard work!
 

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Picture is great, love those eyes; she is pretty. Yes it is hard work but in the end it's worth it !!! I know people on here have cats so hopefully somebody has some ideas, or the cat will let her know !! Good luck and enjoy puppyhood !!
 

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Thanks again!
I do want to keep her because I am attached to her now, BUT, I just got home at 11pm tonight. Dog was in her crate, so I took her out to let her go potty. She did great and peed and pooped, then I let her stay downstairs and she was calmly playing with her toys, but then suddenly she began attacking the cat who was chilling on the sofa, and I said NO, and went to get her, but she obviously thought this was a game, and started running awa from me, then was running full speed all over the place. I took her and put her back in her upstairs crate she sleeps in and she was whining a little as I left her, but this is what worries me. That pup was out of control just then and I had no idea what to do. Ugh. I jsut want to be a good, responsible dog owner! I don't know who would want a pup either. Not me. If I'd chosen, I'd have rescued an older dog. This is a HUGE responsibility, and I can see this pup has attitude already.
Yeah...that's just a puppy being a puppy. Huskies have high prey drive, so make sure you begin to teach the pup to leave the cat alone now!
 

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Yeah...that's just a puppy being a puppy. Huskies have high prey drive, so make sure you begin to teach the pup to leave the cat alone now!

Thank you for this. I am trying, but to be honest, I am not sure how to teach her to leave the cat alone. No matter how stern I am with her she continues to treat the cat as a plaything, and jump on him, and when the cat hisses and swipes at her, the more fun she has. Any advice welcome as to how to stop her.

In addition, I have a pressing issue I need advice about. My daughter got a job at a barn. She is taking her 10 week old puppy with her. I have 2 issues with this. First, pup has only had her first round of shots. Second, today the pup got kicked by a horse. My daughter said she was calling on pup to stay away, but to be fair the pup isn't yet trained, and is super excitable, so of course she isn't going to stay away from the horses! So, is she wrong to be taking a not fully vaccinated, untrained pup to work with her for 8 hours a day at a barn?

Thanks guys.
 

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In addition, I have a pressing issue I need advice about. My daughter got a job at a barn. She is taking her 10 week old puppy with her. I have 2 issues with this. First, pup has only had her first round of shots. Second, today the pup got kicked by a horse. My daughter said she was calling on pup to stay away, but to be fair the pup isn't yet trained, and is super excitable, so of course she isn't going to stay away from the horses! So, is she wrong to be taking a not fully vaccinated, untrained pup to work with her for 8 hours a day at a barn?
Yes, I would say she is very wrong! This is a danger not only for the puppy, but for the horses and other people. If the puppy is being allowed to run around freely (which, given she was kicked, I assume she is), she could startle a horse and cause an injury to a person or a horse as well as herself. Heck, even if she is leashed, if she barks at a rider on a spooked horse, she could cause an injury. I would be more worried about this, as I assume the barn probably isn't a super high traffic other dog area so the lack of vaccines probably isn't AS big an issue (though still not great). I don't know what kind of barn this is, but assuming there are boarders, I know I would be very unhappy to come to see my horse and see a dog harassing it. I don't care what kind of dog.

People who let their dogs harass horses drove me crazy as a horse owner. I don't care how bombproof the horse is. It is dangerous all around! There are proper ways to teach a dog to be okay around horses, and letting a 10 week old puppy have free run of a barn is not one of them.

ETA: She is lovely! I'm not trying to be rude (I realize my comment may have come off harsh). I've just been out riding at state parks where leash laws are technically required, and had dogs charge me and my horse. Owners half the time weren't even watching their off leash dogs, and the other half would be screaming at the dog and chasing it around, making the whole situation even worse. Luckily my horse was pretty bombproof, but that doesn't make this a good experience for the horse or the rider, and they are lucky my 1200 lb animal didn't decide to do something about it. One well placed kick and the dog is dead. It isn't something to mess around with!
 

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Yes, I would say she is very wrong! This is a danger not only for the puppy, but for the horses and other people. If the puppy is being allowed to run around freely (which, given she was kicked, I assume she is), she could startle a horse and cause an injury to a person or a horse as well as herself. Heck, even if she is leashed, if she barks at a rider on a spooked horse, she could cause an injury. I would be more worried about this, as I assume the barn probably isn't a super high traffic other dog area so the lack of vaccines probably isn't AS big an issue (though still not great). I don't know what kind of barn this is, but assuming there are boarders, I know I would be very unhappy to come to see my horse and see a dog harassing it. I don't care what kind of dog.

People who let their dogs harass horses drove me crazy as a horse owner. I don't care how bombproof the horse is. It is dangerous all around! There are proper ways to teach a dog to be okay around horses, and letting a 10 week old puppy have free run of a barn is not one of them.

ETA: She is lovely! I'm not trying to be rude (I realize my comment may have come off harsh). I've just been out riding at state parks where leash laws are technically required, and had dogs charge me and my horse. Owners half the time weren't even watching their off leash dogs, and the other half would be screaming at the dog and chasing it around, making the whole situation even worse. Luckily my horse was pretty bombproof, but that doesn't make this a good experience for the horse or the rider, and they are lucky my 1200 lb animal didn't decide to do something about it. One well placed kick and the dog is dead. It isn't something to mess around with!
Well, I have been to the barn, and they do have a couple of dogs wandering around, but they are older dogs, well used to being at the barn, and used to it, and trained. I just had reservations before she took it because I knew it wasn't going to just wander and sit and sleep like the older dogs, but rather as a pup, it just wants to run and play and it isn't yet trained. I'm thinking that if the owner of the barn felt the pup was going to spook the horses she would say to stop bringing it. I have to confess I wasn't thinking of the horses, even though I ride myself, I just feel for the pup, and I've told daughter if pup is still limping tomorrow she has to go the vet. I honestly don't know what to do for the best for the pup. Do I sell/give it away from under her? I just don't know. I never asked for this. She brought this poor pup into our home without asking. I just come on here to check I'm not being harsh, and I'm glad you agree that whatever the reason, it just isn't ok to be taking the pup there.
 

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Thank you for this. I am trying, but to be honest, I am not sure how to teach her to leave the cat alone. No matter how stern I am with her she continues to treat the cat as a plaything, and jump on him, and when the cat hisses and swipes at her, the more fun she has. Any advice welcome as to how to stop her.

In addition, I have a pressing issue I need advice about. My daughter got a job at a barn. She is taking her 10 week old puppy with her. I have 2 issues with this. First, pup has only had her first round of shots. Second, today the pup got kicked by a horse. My daughter said she was calling on pup to stay away, but to be fair the pup isn't yet trained, and is super excitable, so of course she isn't going to stay away from the horses! So, is she wrong to be taking a not fully vaccinated, untrained pup to work with her for 8 hours a day at a barn?

Thanks guys.
For the cat, look up counter conditioning. If you search something along the lines of "how to teach dog to leave the cat alone" on this forum, you can find a few good threads. Honestly, our cats taught our dogs how to behave around them. They were very "take no crap" cats and were very dog savvy.

Please take the pup to the vet. Like, emergency vet. A kick from a horse can be devastating to an adult dog, let alone a puppy! Internal bleeding, broken bones, that type of thing, and dogs do not show pain the way humans do. The pup could be in a lot more pain than it is letting on.

If there are unknown dogs wandering around this barn, then I certainly wouldn't take the pup. If known, vaccinated dogs are there, then it is probably generally safe (at least disease wise). At our farm, our dogs hung out in the barn with us from 8 weeks old on, but we knew the medical histories of all animals on the property and it was only our family going in there. If this is a public barn or a boarding barn type situation I would certainly be a bit more cautious. You don't know where people have been, and some diseases like parvo can be carried in on shoes.

I don't think a barn is necessarily a bad place for a puppy to be, but your daughter must be supervising the pup or have it confined when she can't. Is it realistic for her to able to do her job and watch her puppy at the same time? Our puppies were generally introduced to the barn and all the farm animals that went with it as pups. They were always supervised, or on a leash and tied out of the way in a pen so they could watch but weren't in danger of being trampled. They learned how things worked in the barn, and eventually they learned how they were expected to behave. We had one dog that actually worked the cattle, and another that basically just picked a spot and hung out while we did our chores.

But, that was a private facility, and almost all the animals in there were accustomed to dogs and their behaviors. Our dumb horses let kittens play with their tails and seemed to think barking puppies were fuzzy tuffs of hay. A place with multiple people and animals that may not like dogs is a different monster.

If you don't think your daughter can care for the pup properly, then I think you need to take over responsibility for the pup. Your rules, your way. If you don't want to do that, then yes, I think you should rehome the puppy.
 

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I mean, even if the barn owner is okay with the situation and the horses are all somehow bombproof against a crazy puppy, then as the dog's owner it is your daughter's job and your job to protect the puppy. It got kicked once. The fact it is only limping (no matter how unfortunate it is the puppy is injured at all) is incredibly lucky -- it could have been so much worse. I don't have a problem with dogs around horses, so long as the dogs are as you mentioned above: Well trained and used to being around horses. Not puppies who can create issues or get themselves injured if not properly trained how to be around horses. Even the most bombproof horse can accidentally injure a dog that is underfoot, so even if the horses are 100% okay with a rambunctious puppy, a puppy that isn't 100% recall trained and respecting the horses' space is likely to end up injured, as you found out today.

Can you talk to her about it and explain how lucky she is the puppy isn't worse off from the kick and try to compromise that if the barn owner is okay with it, she should start going in when she isn't working to acclimate the puppy to horses and work on respecting them? Assuming with training the dog can become chill around horses, maybe as an adult dog, she could take her to work with her. But that as a puppy, it isn't the right atmosphere for 8 hours a day?

Just an idea, if you are okay with the puppy staying and she might be willing to listen to reason as far as making sure the puppy isn't injured more severely again.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
For the cat, look up counter conditioning. If you search something along the lines of "how to teach dog to leave the cat alone" on this forum, you can find a few good threads. Honestly, our cats taught our dogs how to behave around them. They were very "take no crap" cats and were very dog savvy.

Please take the pup to the vet. Like, emergency vet. A kick from a horse can be devastating to an adult dog, let alone a puppy! Internal bleeding, broken bones, that type of thing, and dogs do not show pain the way humans do. The pup could be in a lot more pain than it is letting on.

If there are unknown dogs wandering around this barn, then I certainly wouldn't take the pup. If known, vaccinated dogs are there, then it is probably generally safe (at least disease wise). At our farm, our dogs hung out in the barn with us from 8 weeks old on, but we knew the medical histories of all animals on the property and it was only our family going in there. If this is a public barn or a boarding barn type situation I would certainly be a bit more cautious. You don't know where people have been, and some diseases like parvo can be carried in on shoes.

I don't think a barn is necessarily a bad place for a puppy to be, but your daughter must be supervising the pup or have it confined when she can't. Is it realistic for her to able to do her job and watch her puppy at the same time? Our puppies were generally introduced to the barn and all the farm animals that went with it as pups. They were always supervised, or on a leash and tied out of the way in a pen so they could watch but weren't in danger of being trampled. They learned how things worked in the barn, and eventually they learned how they were expected to behave. We had one dog that actually worked the cattle, and another that basically just picked a spot and hung out while we did our chores.

But, that was a private facility, and almost all the animals in there were accustomed to dogs and their behaviors. Our dumb horses let kittens play with their tails and seemed to think barking puppies were fuzzy tuffs of hay. A place with multiple people and animals that may not like dogs is a different monster.

If you don't think your daughter can care for the pup properly, then I think you need to take over responsibility for the pup. Your rules, your way. If you don't want to do that, then yes, I think you should rehome the puppy.
Thank you for this. I am sharing your advice with my daughter and hoping she takes heed.

I mean, even if the barn owner is okay with the situation and the horses are all somehow bombproof against a crazy puppy, then as the dog's owner it is your daughter's job and your job to protect the puppy. It got kicked once. The fact it is only limping (no matter how unfortunate it is the puppy is injured at all) is incredibly lucky -- it could have been so much worse. I don't have a problem with dogs around horses, so long as the dogs are as you mentioned above: Well trained and used to being around horses. Not puppies who can create issues or get themselves injured if not properly trained how to be around horses. Even the most bombproof horse can accidentally injure a dog that is underfoot, so even if the horses are 100% okay with a rambunctious puppy, a puppy that isn't 100% recall trained and respecting the horses' space is likely to end up injured, as you found out today.

Can you talk to her about it and explain how lucky she is the puppy isn't worse off from the kick and try to compromise that if the barn owner is okay with it, she should start going in when she isn't working to acclimate the puppy to horses and work on respecting them? Assuming with training the dog can become chill around horses, maybe as an adult dog, she could take her to work with her. But that as a puppy, it isn't the right atmosphere for 8 hours a day?

Just an idea, if you are okay with the puppy staying and she might be willing to listen to reason as far as making sure the puppy isn't injured more severely again.
Thank you for your advice. I agree and I appreciate the confirmation and the advice.
 

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Thank you for this. I am trying, but to be honest, I am not sure how to teach her to leave the cat alone. No matter how stern I am with her she continues to treat the cat as a plaything, and jump on him, and when the cat hisses and swipes at her, the more fun she has. Any advice welcome as to how to stop her.

In addition, I have a pressing issue I need advice about. My daughter got a job at a barn. She is taking her 10 week old puppy with her. I have 2 issues with this. First, pup has only had her first round of shots. Second, today the pup got kicked by a horse. My daughter said she was calling on pup to stay away, but to be fair the pup isn't yet trained, and is super excitable, so of course she isn't going to stay away from the horses! So, is she wrong to be taking a not fully vaccinated, untrained pup to work with her for 8 hours a day at a barn?

Thanks guys.
It is incredibly dangerous to have a young, untrained puppy loose around horses. Regardless of vaccine status of the pup, regardless of vaccine status of the adult dogs around the barn. Your daughter is there to work, not there to spend all day supervising and corralling the puppy. If someone wants to have a puppy or puppies around their own horses at their own barn, that's their choice. I have been around puppies at a barn and on rides, around dogs at a barn and on rides, etc. I'm not coming at this with no background basically. But training, breed and supervision matter. Huskies are not known for their "stay close, be obedient" side to start with so that isn't exactly helping.

You and she are LUCKY that all that has happened is the dog surviving a kick. First, a kick is powerful and can cause severe injuries and death to even an adult dog so let's hope that the pup isn't bleeding internally. Second, a horse that kicks a dog risks whomever and whatever else is around that horse including itself. What happens if the farrier is there working on a horse and the puppy darts by? What happens if someone is mounting a horse and the puppy darts by?

The only maybe-kinda-sorta way that if I were the barn owner would I allow an employee to bring a puppy is if the puppy were either crated or in a secure stall during the workday with reasonable, leashed potty breaks 3-4 times a day (as in, not so often as to distract the employee from actually doing their job).


Also, be prepared that this dog may never be safe around a cat. Consider what you would need to do to provide 100% separation at ALL times from the cat. Could the dog be fine with the cat? Sure, maybe. Is there a real possibility that the dog won't be? Yep. I have one dog that after extensive training could be in the general vicinity at a barn of savvy outdoor cats who had plenty of escape routes. I have another dog that cannot at all, in any way, be able to reach a cat because her strength is great and her prey drive just as powerful. Neither would be safe to be in the same house as a cat.
 
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