Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an 11 week old goldendoodle. I chose her due to her quiet nature and seeming ability to connect with her humans. She spends 4 days per week with my son, his girlfriend and their rescue dog. We all pretty much agree on dog training and have mostly been focusing on tons of socialization. I plan to train her to be my partner in providing mental health therapy to people of all ages.
She is such a low key dog, and young, so I often pick her up and carry her to the proper place outside, to the car, etc. She loves to crawl under couches and decks to sleep, but really hard to get her to come out. She started growling at us when we gently pulled her out. So, all entrances are blocked now.
So, now she has been growling at us periodically when picked up. Yesterday she growled at son's gf as she began to pet her while resting. This was very discouraging to see.
The breeder did a great job with handling her. We have continued with holding and gentling daily. She is hand fed part of each meal. We do usual commands dozens of times each day.
I am truly concerned about this one trait,( growling, which has increased in frequency and volume)
And what it might mean as far as far as her ability to be a agentle therapy dog. She displays fantastic traits otherwise.
I have read not to tell her "no" when she growls and not to show her"who is dominant", but how should this be handled?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Therapy dogs choose to do the work. You are forcing her to be handled. Big difference. She'll get there in the end. Therapy dogs aren't petted when at rest are they?

Growling is good, stop and evaluate how to get around her grouchiness. My dogs have always responded brilliantly to a bit of cheese if I need to move them.

There's no good reason to be petting a sleeping dog. She seems to prefer caves for napping, hope you set up a crate or bed for her naps where you will leave her alone.

When looking into ways for kids to better understand dogs I found a video about petting. Dog must approach you. Pet a few times then stop. If dog leans in then pet a few more times. That way you know dog is interested in the attention. I've incorporated that approach with my biting Bucky. He doesn't growl or bite when petted too long but he gets more nervous which I hate to see. Now I pet and stop to see how he's feeling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,407 Posts
Stop picking the dog up. A lot of dogs don't like to be picked up. It could be that she's sore, it could be she's just annoyed by it. Same with sleeping. Let her sleep.
Growling tends to be thought of as a bad thing, as aggression, but really aside from subtle body cues it's the only way dogs have to communicate that something is displeasing them. Heed her warnings. If you need her, lure her with something and praise her from coming to you, and leash her to take her somewhere. Only lift her if you have to.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top