Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our 10 weeks old husky knows that peeing in house is bad. We have established that by saying "NO" with a loud voice. She has successfully learned that ringing the bell means she can go outside but she prefers to go out to catch some bugs by the glass door. We have been constantly rewarding her by treats and playtime every time she goes outside for pee/poop. It seems she can hold it for 3-4 hours nowadays. Sometimes she will drink a lot, maybe because it is warm and get a little bit too excited indoors then without warning start peeing inside. She immediately stops when I say "NO!" and even starts running towards the door.

I have a feeling it has to do with the 90°F+. Has anyone had a similar problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
That is a northern breed thing, I'd bet she does better early morning and late evening/night with going out. Mine do that too, as pups they get fussy about the heat. Of course, being a lot of pups are born in the spring, summer is potty training time for them and, a nightmare for the new owners of these breeds.

I combo train them. I have the bell for go out and, I take them out on a schedule, even if they don't ask to go out but, I also give them a puppy pad in the bathroom to use if they won't go out in the heat of the day. Usually that's after a mid morning nap, then it's too hot for their liking and, inside is more relaxing and comfortable for them.

They will sort it out come fall and cooler weather, then I remove the pad and, make them go outside only. By the second summer, they are fine, they go outside every time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Our 10 weeks old husky knows that peeing in house is bad. We have established that by saying "NO" with a loud voice. She has successfully learned that ringing the bell means she can go outside but she prefers to go out to catch some bugs by the glass door. We have been constantly rewarding her by treats and playtime every time she goes outside for pee/poop. It seems she can hold it for 3-4 hours nowadays. Sometimes she will drink a lot, maybe because it is warm and get a little bit too excited indoors then without warning start peeing inside. She immediately stops when I say "NO!" and even starts running towards the door.

I have a feeling it has to do with the 90°F+. Has anyone had a similar problem?
At 10 weeks old, she is NOWHERE NEAR being fully or reliably potty trained, much less being able to tell you when she needs to go outside. Most puppies don't develop full control of their bladder until they're over 6 months old, which means that they often don't know they have to go until seconds before they are going. She does not have time to ask to go outside.

You shouldn't shout at your puppy or scold her for potty accidents. Scolding her can lead her to believe that going IN FRONT OF YOU is bad. That leads to dogs who sneak off and pee behind the armchair where you can't see them, which is absolutely not something you want, right?

Instead, you should be taking her out every 20-30 minutes (even more frequently if she still has accidents) when she is up and active, and she should be 100% supervised. You cannot expect her to tell you she has to go out at this point in her development, so it is your job to give her plenty of opportunity to go in the correct spot and reward her for a job well done. When you cannot supervise, she should be crated.

The heat may have something to do with it....but I doubt it. More like she's a 10 week old puppy and doesn't have the ability to truly understand that she needs to go.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
I agree with Lillith. Also remember that puppies are growing and changing rapidly, so it's very common to see setbacks and fluctuations in how long they can hold their bladder and bowels. If she's urinating inside, set a timer and take her out more frequently, with special attention to when she's been drinking a lot, because that absolutely will make her have to pee more.

It's kind of like having a toddler. When a 2-year-old says they have to pee, they have to pee right now and there'd better be a bathroom nearby. This is because their bodies aren't developed fully yet, and their brains don't get the "full bladder/bowels" signal until it's very urgent. If they're distracted, they might not even get that much warning.

So set your pup up for success and take her out more frequently - and keep up with her treat/play parties for going in the right places! No sense scolding her for something she doesn't have full physical control over yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Agree with Lillith and Daysleepers.
She is a 10 week old puppy and any time she pees in the house it is your fault because you are expecting too much too young.

You need to be pre-emptive and get her out before she pees in the house and go out with her. If she does not pee, crate her for 15 minutes and take her out again. Rinse and repeat until she pees and/or poops and have really good treats to reward her.

I don't consider a dog house broken until around a year old. That said, the last 3 dogs, gotten as puppies, have had a total of 3 accidents in the house. One had two and the youngest has had one. Miss Greta has never had one.

An aside: None of these dogs are in the house together or loose together outside and I do use crates and outdoor kennels. The oldest dog is a house dog. The competition dogs are only in the house to let them know that there is such a thing as being indoors and in a house so that when they retire they won't have any issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
I let mine out every 30 minutes, after every nap, and after they eat, and we don't go back in until they've peed (sometimes it means spending 30 minutes outside and watching like a hawk, but so be it. My next puppy is probably going to be a Winter puppy and that's not going to be fun). I ignore them when they go inside too.. just clean it up (but if I see them starting to sniff around, out they go). Really, my last two had almost no accident after 4 months doing it that way (it's a LONG 2 months though).

I never really trained them to tell me when they want to go, but I still let them go out every 2 hours or so (and every time they eat). I ask 'outside?' and typically they'll go to the door if they have to go. Rarely one of them will nudge towards the door or whine at me if they have to go, but it doesn't happen much. One of my friends trained the dogs with a bell and it's a major pain because they would ring it ALL THE TIME to go out, even if they don't want to pee... Thankfully my dogs like being inside with us more than outside anyway (especially in the heat).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,374 Posts
Your puppy won't have full control of bowel and bladder until 12 weeks. Put puppy on a schedule, every two hours. As puppy gets better, you can move to every three hours during the day. Pick up water at 8:00pm and make sure puppy goes out at 10pm. Its going to be tough for a few weeks, but hang in there. You will have puppy totally trained by 6 months.
I totally agree with the schedule advice. But puppies do not have full control of their bladder at 12 weeks of age. More like at 6 months of age (for most dogs) they START having more control. I don't mean to pick at you. I just don't want anyone misconstruing your words and thinking their puppy 'should' be house trained at 12 weeks of age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
I let mine out every 30 minutes, after every nap, and after they eat, and we don't go back in until they've peed (sometimes it means spending 30 minutes outside and watching like a hawk, but so be it.
Yeah this is pretty much what it takes. Things will slowly get better and better with time/age. Some dogs just aren't great at letting you now when they have to go out either, even once they're fully trained. Our first dog whines to be let out, but our second dog just stands at the door silently. So as a puppy if you didn't see him standing at the door soon enough, there would be a mess to clean up. He's still not great at asking to go out, but we let him out on a regular schedule so it's not an issue.

Neither of our dogs were 100% housebroken (i.e. NEVER had an accident again) until 10-11 months old.

But puppies do not have full control of their bladder at 12 weeks of age. More like at 6 months of age (for most dogs) they START having more control. I don't mean to pick at you. I just don't want anyone misconstruing your words and thinking their puppy 'should' be house trained at 12 weeks of age.
12 weeks is better than 10, but not by much. It just gets better and better slowly over time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
I have much experience with this. No you will not have a housebroken dog at 12 weeks. Yes, they do gain control of bowel and bladder at 12 weeks. Prior to that a puppy has no clue it has to go until it is going. Housebreaking can begin at 12 weeks. It takes until 6 months, like I said prior, to make them reliable. I'm pretty sure I did say all of this in the above post, but sometimes I'm not great at explaining things, especially when three toddlers are vying for my attention...not to mention the dogs. Basically, you put puppy on the 2 hour schedule until 12 weeks. Ignore any mistakes during that time and praise all outside potty. At 12 weeks you can begin to stretch it out to 3 hours, and correct puppy with a no if he goes in the wrong place. He will already understand that going potty makes you happy, so no fear there. If you want you can train to potty on a command, by using your word when he goes outside, I do and its conveinent. Don't use treats, you don't want to distract him. As for individual breed, i don't know, it may be shorter or longer, but I have trained many Lhasas, known for being independent, successfully with this method, in 6 months.Hopefully that is more clear, and makes sense. I usually send this information home with my new puppy owners because it is so important.
At 4-6 months old a puppy's bladder and bowels are usually fully developed. Depends on the dog. At 12 weeks? Nah. They have little if any actual control. Sure, they can hold it, but "control" might be too strong of a word for a puppy that young. There are still mere seconds between "have to go" and "going".

Don't correct puppy! Scolding a puppy for going potty will teach them that they shouldn't go IN FRONT OF YOU. That means you have a puppy who is going to sneak off and go potty where you can't see them, or you'll have a dog that you can't get to potty on a walk or something because you're watching them. If they are going in the house, it means 2 things: 1) They physically can't hold it any longer and you need to let them out to potty more frequently, or 2) They actually don't understand that outside is the place to go, and potty inside is not what is supposed to happen.

You can use treats. Treats help enforce that potty outside is super rewarding. Put them in your pocket and don't take them out until puppy is finished, and you probably won't distract the dog. The dog needs to learn that treats only come when they do something awesome, anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,374 Posts
Wow, 20 years and you're still unwilling to learn the new developments in dog training? Very sorry to hear that.

Also, have you raised anything other than Lhasas? Really easy to yank and scold and correct a little dog... I have worked with plenty of dogs who would bite you over less.

Lastly, do you do any health testing or titling with your dogs? I'm looking at your website and am not finding much more than what a common backyard breeder would post.

ETA: I just searched for any records on the OFA website and can't find anything. Is record of your health testing in a different database? I imagine with 20 years of breeding, there must be something somewhere that shows the consideration you put into breeding.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
20 years of breeding and raising puppies. I guess I don't know what I'm talking about.
All my dogs are trained using correction, and every single one will potty in front of me without hesitation. What they won't do is potty in the house. That's why they are housebroken.
Relieving themselves is reward enough. They don't care if its the yard or $400 Persian rug. Unless you provide them with rules. Maybe you don't care if your dog pees in the house, but apparently the OP does. The dog will do whatever is rewarding. Not having a full bladder is rewarding. Does nature give treats when the dog pees? Nope. The act is reward enough. In your pocket...right because dogs have a terrible sense of smell...they will be distracted.
You "train" your dog your way, and I'll have a clean house and obedient dogs with mine. I have 7 dogs currently, and not one goes in my house, and every one will "go pee" , in front of me, on leash, on command. Every. Single. Time. But surely I have no clue what I'm talking about. I haven't raised puppies...
Most of the people on this forum have successfully potty trained dogs and have never, ever had to use corrections, including myself. My dog NEVER has accidents in the house unless he's sick, and even then he's horrified and probably holds it until he absolutely physically cannot.

I really don't think you know what you're talking about. You're using antiquated methods that are, frankly, unnecessary and abusive. Easy to do with dogs not even quarter of your size, I suppose. I don't care how long you've been "breeding" and "training" Lhasas.

Wow, 20 years and you're still unwilling to learn the new developments in dog training? Very sorry to hear that.

Also, have you raised anything other than Lhasas? Really easy to yank and scold and correct a little dog... I have worked with plenty of dogs who would bite you over less.

Lastly, do you do any health testing or titling with your dogs? I'm looking at your website and am not finding much more than what a common backyard breeder would post.

ETA: I just searched for any records on the OFA website and can't find anything. Is record of your health testing in a different database? I imagine with 20 years of breeding, there must be something somewhere that shows the consideration you put into breeding.
I second this. I'm not seeing anything on you website. I certainly hope you put more consideration into your breeding than you do your training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,374 Posts
"Breeders do not have to justify why they choose a dog to mate to a bitch."

Of course breeders do not have to justify anything. But a good breeder will provide reasons why, whether for the betterment of the breed or sport/working ability or anything else. I am very PRO good breeders. One of my dogs is from a phenomenal breeder.

"My dogs are not reduced to simple testing for one or two health problems, they are tested for everything. Knees, hips, heart, lungs, internals, thyroid panels, liver, ect."

That's nice, but can you elaborate? Care to share where that information is recorded? Or are you talking about a simple vet checkup? Every breeder worth their salt I've interacted with either freely provided this information on their website or was happy to share it. It is NOT sharing personal information. For example, I was very easily able to find records for a dog from a great breeder in my area: https://www.ofa.org/advanced-search?f=sr&appnum=1258309

I have no affiliation with that breeder and I do not know her address, phone number, etc. I do not know the dog. I know that through the database, she has cared about the health and genetics of her dogs, and the overall breed, for many generations.

I am asking very simple questions that I ask every breeder. This is basic information, the bare minimum.

All I see in your post is a rant full of emotion. No objective information that helps me understand your breeding program.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Why is that every time someone gets called out on their shenanigans they devolve into a rant of "I don't have to prove anything!!!!!" and called everyone childish because they refuted their claims with facts, and then storms away from thread in a hot rage? Same thing every time.

You realize there's more than conformation shows, right? You could do obedience or agility, or even therapy work. Doesn't matter what the dog looks like. Many good breeders don't necessarily breed to the current breed standard, but they at least do something with their dogs, whether that be participating in competitions or performing work such as herding or hunting, to prove they are capable creatures. They also typically have their dog's health testing records readily available to anyone who wishes to see them....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,932 Posts
Good breeders breed because they want to better the breed and have a specific idea of what that means. Or to preserve what they consider important in the breed, and what that means. They have varying definitions of better and what's important, but there's some purpose.

It is not producing puppies without a direction or goal, simply to have created the puppies.

This applies for sports breeders, conformation breeders, and people breeding for work. It even applies to people who are trying to create really good pets. You don't have to even breed purebreds to have that.

And yet you *still* can't come up with *anything* or answer questions? Great.

For the record, my 15 month old is has had some health testing. He'll have more when he's 2. He's being looked at as part of an outcross program in a breed with a small gene pool. Meanwhile he's also competing in a couple of sports. (Isn't that hard? Yeah, I know. Terrible. How onerous.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Why is that every time someone gets called out on their shenanigans they devolve into a rant of "I don't have to prove anything!!!!!" and called everyone childish because they refuted their claims with facts, and then storms away from thread in a hot rage? Same thing every time.

You realize there's more than conformation shows, right? You could do obedience or agility, or even therapy work. Doesn't matter what the dog looks like. Many good breeders don't necessarily breed to the current breed standard, but they at least do something with their dogs, whether that be participating in competitions or performing work such as herding or hunting, to prove they are capable creatures. They also typically have their dog's health testing records readily available to anyone who wishes to see them....
THIS!!!
A dog (or horse) can pass conformation and win lots of ribbons but be unstable temperamentally.

I use corrections but man oh man.. mostly I do NOT. I certainly would never correct a dog about pottying!! Good way to create a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Perhaps it's a terminology problem. Correction as in punishment for going in the wrong place NO WAY but, correction as in taking the dog to the correct place every time it tries to go in the wrong place YES.

As for breeding, even though I am not a breeder, I do plan to breed my newest pack member when she is 3 years old. I have family members that want wolfdogs and, cannot afford them. I have chosen Silver to be the sire for his conformation and personality. He is not timid in the least. Knight is very timid by nature and, Halo while a good, healthy dog, does not have quite as good of conformation as Silver. for the people that will get the puppies, they need to be large and bold. They will go to homes with people that are active, bold and assertive themselves so, the dogs need to fit those families.

Of course the pups will be vetted and vaccinated before they go to new homes and, if there are more than the four pups I have homes for, I will seek good homes for them or, if I cannot place them in good homes, I will keep them and, they will live out their lives as my pets.

Being wolfdogs, other than removing them to take them to the vet, they are pack raised until they are eight weeks old, then separated form each other and, from the parents to be crate trained and socialized with humans for the next two weeks. At 10 weeks, they go to new homes, with their crate, in crate toys, food bowl, water bowl, water bottle and, a small bag of the kibble I feed as well as their vet records and, directions to their vet since it is in another town. If for any reason the new owner cannot afford vet care during the first six months (long enough to get them on heart worm prevention) I will pay that. If the new owner EVER cannot keep the dog, I want it back.

Yes, even one time breeders like me, that want a litter for family have reasons for choosing the parents they choose for a litter. No I don't have to justify my choices or reason but, I have no reason not to since they are sound reason and, I am being selective about breeding for specific reasons. I would never breed simply for money from the sale of puppies. Yes, if I get more than four pups, the extras will have adoption fees since they are going to strangers and, a fee helps insure the new owner is serious about caring for the dog and, can afford to care for the dog.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
@Bluemoods all the poster's posts have been wiped (though some are available in quotes), but I'm afraid they were explicitly suggesting verbally reprimanding a 12-week-old puppy over something they have no control over. So not a terminology issue, sadly.

amz_raptor, how's it going? Potty training can definitely be stressful and repetitive, but it's so worth it to do it consistently and positively in the end!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I tried responding before but my post required to be reviewed first. Anyway, we have not had any incidents for the past 3 weeks. Mostly, because at capacity.The last two incidents we had, we tried going 9 hours overnight.... We did a combination of "scolding" for intentional peeing inside the house and positive reinforcement when successful peeing outdoors. There is a point when the puppy morphs into a "responsible dog". For us, it was roughly around 5 months of age.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top