Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Our puppy we got recently has started biting my dad every time she sees him more than any one else even when he is just patting him she lunges at his face and recently she bit his lip and in was bleeding .
its making my dad upset because she bits him the most.

Is this normal, what does it mean and how can I stop it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
How is your Dad petting her? Is he leaning over her and trying to pet her on top of her head or back? if so, many dogs are uncomfortable with this. Have your dad get down so he's closer to her level, let her come to him, and pet her on her chest or side and see if that helps. Or, does he like to play rough games with her where he allows her to "bite" him during a game? If so, those games need to end.

Also, read the sticky, "the bite stops here." That will give you some ways to correct the problem. Biting is normal for puppies. She probably just needs some guidance as to what is appropriate to bite (her toys) and what is not appropriate(your Dad and all other humans).

btw, I'm not saying your Dad is doing anything wrong but just tossing out some possible scenarios in the first papagraph.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
Well isn't this the same pup that was biting you/your legs etc. Did you clear that problem up. That should give you a step up to solve this problem. How old is this rascal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
She Is about 14 week and we have enrolled her in a puppy class starting next week
she Is still biting my legs when i walk but when my dad sits down she jumps up on him and starts biting him he will put her down and say no and ignore her but she just jumps back up
she doesnt do it with anyone else , jumping up on them so my dad thinks she doesnt like him :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
She Is about 14 week and we have enrolled her in a puppy class starting next week
she Is still biting my legs when i walk but when my dad sits down she jumps up on him and starts biting him he will put her down and say no and ignore her but she just jumps back up
she doesnt do it with anyone else , jumping up on them so my dad thinks she doesnt like him :p
You've heard the statement, "familiarity breeds contempt" This is off the wall but the pup if with your dad a great deal of time can just feel very comfortable biting him where as people she does not know as well she acts differently with(no biting)

I see where you say your dad ignores dog but dog just jumps back up. In earlier replies you were told to actually leave room to ignore dog etc. Just saying no and putting dog down off lap and sitting there is not going to solve dad's problem. I am going to assume the dog does not have the slightest idea what the word no is at all. There is a huge thread about "dog understands no" going on now. Pro or Con is a choice of the "no" theory is still up in the air. I will kinda dive in an say that your pup does not understand no yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
when my dad sits down she jumps up on him and starts biting him
Then he mustn't let her jump up on her own terms. He can stop her from jumping up by watching her as he sits down and putting his hand up in a "stop in the name of love" signal as she starts to approach him. She should only jump on people when invited. He should make himself very aware of his own personal space and not let her just barge in whenever she wants.

Once she gets the idea that she can't just jump on people anytime she wants to, then have him invite her up. If she behaves, then she can stay. If she starts acting like a jerk, then he puts her down and watches to make sure she doesn't jump right back up. Use the hand signal again. And again. And again if necessary. She must understand that as long as she bites him she isn't allowed in his lap.

You're obviously not doing NILIF or she wouldn't be jumping up uninvited. Start it immediately and get your dad on board and practice it 100% of the time. The longer you wait, the worse it's going to get.

If this is your Yorkie, think of her as a large breed. Would you want a German Shepherd jumping up in your dad's lap at any time? Just because she's small doesn't mean she should rule the roost. You'll end up with one of those little, monstrous, misbehaving dogs that everyone hates.

she doesnt do it with anyone else , jumping up on them so my dad thinks she doesnt like him :p
It's not that she doesn't like him, she just doesn't respect him. She's treating him like a toy. He has to set some boundaries and not let this precious puppy grow into a tiny terror.

I haven't read your other threads, but if this dog is allowed on the furniture at any time and sleeps with you, then you've got some work to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
If the argument is still open about dogs understanding the word "no" How on earth are they going to understand the hand signal with the meaning below.

"stop in the name of love"
This may be way beyond their learning capacity.:eek:

aaahhhhh! the world of doggy semantics:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
It's a blocking signal. I don't expect them to understand "Stop in the name of love", I said that so the OP would know what signal I meant. The dog instinctually understands a block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,699 Posts
Oh good grief. This is a 14 wk old puppy! OF COURSE she's going to get excited and jump and nip and be wild and crazy. Good luck with the STOP (in the name of love) signal. Hah!

Most puppies do exactly what your puppy is doing. The easiest way to stop it is to remove yourself - or in this case, your dod needs to remove himself, so she does not have access to him. I use an ex-pen, or, baby gates to confine the puppy to one room. If the puppy continues to jump or nip, I step over the gate, or out of the ex-pen. Then try again in a couple of minutes. I don't get upset, or say/yell NO, I just leave. No access. The puppy is IGNORED. Dogs learn through association. Your puppy will learn that nipping = loss of person (attention, affection, etc.). It took my little "land shark" a couple of days before she figured out her butt nips weren't working! LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
If you've never tried it... :) I have raised 4 puppies and used this blocking signal with them and it worked great.

You can leave the room every time the puppy misbehaves, but I refuse to let my puppy's behavior make me leave the room. There are different schools of thought on issues like this (clearly). One is to go through all sorts of machinations (getting up and leaving the room repeatedly when you just want to sit and watch a show on TV) to get the dog to stop something. Another way is to stop them. The first gives the dog all the control. If he wants someone to leave, he can just start gnawing on their face. The second allows the owner to tell the dog that the behavior he is displaying is unacceptable. Gnawing on people is unacceptable. Different strokes for different folks, I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
Oh good grief. This is a 14 wk old puppy! OF COURSE she's going to get excited and jump and nip and be wild and crazy. Good luck with the STOP (in the name of love) signal. Hah!

Most puppies do exactly what your puppy is doing. The easiest way to stop it is to remove yourself - or in this case, your dod needs to remove himself, so she does not have access to him. I use an ex-pen, or, baby gates to confine the puppy to one room. If the puppy continues to jump or nip, I step over the gate, or out of the ex-pen. Then try again in a couple of minutes. I don't get upset, or say/yell NO, I just leave. No access. The puppy is IGNORED. Dogs learn through association. Your puppy will learn that nipping = loss of person (attention, affection, etc.). It took my little "land shark" a couple of days before she figured out her butt nips weren't working! LOL
Well everybody could be right except OP as he/she has not developed a training ritual/pattern/method and is still way back in the beginning of dog work. I have mentioned many times puppies can do no wrong, but it does not mean you can't have a lot of fun throwing hand signals, words whatever at them. This is the way people learn about dogs/puppies etc. What works with 4 puppies may not work with the 5th pup and then you go back to the drawing boards and try a new approach. The more approaches/tools you have the more fun you have with your successes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
For those who think blocking is just a crazy idea, maybe you'll listen to Patricia McConnell:

Body Blocking

Another Way to Stop Jumping: Body Blocking

Dr. Patricia McConnell, noted animal behaviorist and author of The Other End of the Leash and For the Love of a Dog, describes a process that she calls "body blocking," which simply means taking up the space to prevent your dog from doing so.

Next time you are walking in the door and your leaping Lab makes a running charge for you, clasp your hands against your stomach and lean slightly forward, blocking the space with your body. It also helps to look away, rather than make eye contact. Remember that you're not trying to bump into your dog (although he may bump into you), but are simply occupying the space he was hoping to occupy.

You may have to do several repetitions of this, especially if your dog has had lots of practice leaping, but it can be very effective if you are consistent. He can learn to wait for permission to jump up, whether you are standing or sitting, with just the tiniest of barely perceptible body movements on your part. Wouldn't that be nice?
I'm certainly not saying that this is the only way, but it's ONE very effective way. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,605 Posts
I agree, I use body-blocking on a daily basis at work to prevent dogs from jumping on me, not only in my classes but when walking the store or in the hotel. I see a lot of the same dogs over and over again and they very quickly learn not to jump on me. The owners are impressed with how instinctively they sit for me, when they won't do it for their own people.

That said, these are mostly adult dogs. My 11 week old puppy isn't responding at all to body language. At this point I have to ignore her completely when she's jumping and reward her for not jumping, and we're making progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,699 Posts
For those who think blocking is just a crazy idea, maybe you'll listen to Patricia McConnell:
It's certainly not a crazy "idea," it's sound practice. Just not likely to be very effective on a 14-wk. old excited, jumping, nipping puppy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
isn't this puppy thing the greatest thing on earth??LOL. I really prefer older dogs, puppies are cute but so much work! That's why I only had 1 kid, babies are cute too but soooo much work also:D
I was playing with the soccer ball with my 11 month old pup and for some reason the odd time she likes to run at full speed and body slam me sooooo today I was prepared and didn't budge, braced myself and body slammed her back, she didn't do it again after that, must not as been as much fun for her:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
If you're dad's sitting on the floor when she jumps on him all he has to do is stand up. The pup can't jump on him if he doesn't have a lap. Teach the pup to sit for everything it wants as in NILIF. Another way is to have pup on a lead & bring her into the room your dad's in, walk over to him, if pup instantly goes to jump on him, walk out with pup. Don't give her the chance to jump on him. If she wants to be in the room she has to be good. Have a mat or her bed in the room & teach her to be on the mat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
It's certainly not a crazy "idea," it's sound practice. Just not likely to be very effective on a 14-wk. old excited, jumping, nipping puppy!
Why not? And how would they learn if we didn't teach them? If they can learn to sit, they can learn not to jump.

Of course it's effective. I've used it successfully for 4 puppies, the youngest of which was 10 weeks old at the time, the oldest, 16 weeks. It's certainly worth a try if the OP decides so.

Body Blocking with a Puppy (Video) She actually uses the "Stop in the name of love" signal. Yes, the puppy is older, but I have used this and it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,605 Posts
Why not? And how would they learn if we didn't teach them? If they can learn to sit, they can learn not to jump.

Of course it's effective. I've used it successfully for 4 puppies, the youngest of which was 10 weeks old at the time, the oldest, 16 weeks. It's certainly worth a try if the OP decides so.

Body Blocking with a Puppy (Video) She actually uses the "Stop in the name of love" signal. Yes, the puppy is older, but I have used this and it works.
Who is the woman in the video? She looks very familiar.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top