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Hello! I have a half blood Labrador which is 2-3 month old. Every time i want to play with it the way it plays is biting hard on everything. If i let him bite my hand without pulling it off it will probably injure me(Which it did a couple of times). The other day i took it with me to play with a small dog and it kept biting it hard to the point the other dog cried.
Is it normal for puppies to bite that hard. What should i do to stop this?
 

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All puppies nip and chew—especially while they're teething—but hard biting is definitely a bad habit.

While playing, you should be redirecting the chewing and biting onto appropriate objects (toys), without creating a game out of it. As difficult as it is to do otherwise, yanking your hand away or making sudden movements comes across as a game and entices the puppy to nibble more. Push your hand towards the dog; most likely, he'll be thrown off because it's not the usual game. Afterwards, calmly place a toy into his mouth. Rinse and repeat.

For correction, try a "time out". Turn around, cross your arms, and completely ignore the puppy for a minute or two. Once he's calmed down, resume playing. Rinse and repeat. You could also put it in a puppy-proofed room for a few minutes (I used to put Leia in the bathroom) until they calm down. The idea is to send the message that inappropriate mouthiness means no attention or playing.

I'm not a training expert by any means, but I hoped it helped. :)
 

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Your dog is perfectly normal, but I would not allow him to nip other dogs until they cry. Remove him from the situation if he's not listening to the other dog's "go away" signals. You might find a vaccinated, calm, good with puppies, adult lab or other larger breed dog for him to play with. A good role model dog can really help pups learn how to behave.

I posted this for someone the other day:
Here's some information on puppy biting from another thread:

Puppies explore the world with their mouths! Stopping the nipping takes time and consistency - you need to stick with one method for several weeks (even months) for the nipping to stop completely. One of the most effective techniques is to remove your attention every time he bites. Here's some excellent advice from HankSimon (whom I seem to be quoting frequently)

Bite Inhibition: http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/13_6/features/Bite-Inhibition_16232-1.html

Bite Stops Here: http://www.cockersonline.co.uk/discuss/index.php?topic=64170.0;wap2

wrote the following for some other folks. Note the time and the apology:

The Bite Stops Here takes about 3 days to kick in, even then you only get a reduction of bloodletting, slowly resulting in bloodfree nipping, leading to mouthing, etc. Depending on the reaction of the pup, you don't have to use a Yelp!, you can say Ouch!!!, or Oops, where you want a marking word, to indicate when you are withdrawing attention.

Re-read the Sticky:the Bite Stops Here. perhaps you need to try a little longer. Read this tweak and note the 3 days and the apology....maybe, he ignored the Yelp!, because you ignored the apology. Instead of the Yelp, you can say Ouch! or Oops! Also, it seems to be more effective if you can leave him alone in a timeout ("abandoning him"), rather than putting him into a timeout in the crate. It seems to make the act of withdrawing attention more blatant.

Some Tweaks to Bite Inhibition (to get him to stop biting when he wants to play or otherwise):
1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw... don't step on his paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. (Look for the startle) Praise and pet. He'll bite.
2. When he bites the second time, Yelp. When he stops, praise and pet. He'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. When he bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If he comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. This is important. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip...
4. When he bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing him in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving him. Then, return and interact. (He's still hungry...)
5. When he nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

You can modify the number of steps, but not what you do... for example, you can leave in a huff :), after the second nip or even the first, but you always have to provide a vocal marker, to give him something to react to. I still use a light yelp with my 11 yo when he lets teeth touch skin as I give him a treat. No pressure or harm, but I want him to appear very safe to everyone.

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. He may still nip, but it will be softer and he won't draw blood. And, he should be less aggressive, especially, if you notice the apology. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication. I currently use the yelp when my dog plays tug, then runs with the toy, when he fetches and keeps it out of reach or when he takes a treat too quickly....

Dogs will grab for tug toy and take along some skin. With good Bite Inhibition, as well as withdrawing attention, you can teach most dogs to slow down grabbing, while still being able to rip your arm out of the socket by pulling. My dog is polite and will return my arm to me, so that we can continue playing.
Have you enrolled in a positive reinforcement-based / force-free training class yet? That will help. If you're unable to take classes, check out Kikopup, Sophia Yin, Ian Dunbar, and Karen Pryor for training techniques.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
cookieface and broll441 thanks for your response. I used to pull my hand away fast when he bit it and he though i was playing. I will try what you said - push him away or stop playing with him. Broll441 i'll surely try the steps you wrote.
 

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Be aware that pushing him away may have the same effect as pulling your hand away, especially with a lab - they think everything is a game. I'd try to be calm, slow, and booooring.
 

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Be aware that pushing him away may have the same effect as pulling your hand away, especially with a lab - they think everything is a game. I'd try to be calm, slow, and booooring.
Yes, this. I would leave the area calmly and don't look at him. Being physical in any way will probably just make him come back harder since he will think you're playing.
 

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cookieface and broll441 thanks for your response. I used to pull my hand away fast when he bit it and he though i was playing. I will try what you said - push him away or stop playing with him. Broll441 i'll surely try the steps you wrote.
My puppy thought being pushed away was a hilarious game that meant bite harder and faster, so just keep in mind that method might not work for your little guy.
 

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I agree that your puppy is perfectly NORMAL especially for a lab puppy! There is a reason they are called "land sharks" when they are pups ;). And you have been given great advice above. Your best bet when your puppy starts to bite and play rough is to completely ignore him. If he won't "let you" ignore him stand up or even walk out of the (puppy safe) room for a few minutes. So that he learns when he bites you, you stop playing with him or you leave him. And being a lab puppy he won't like that. Good luck!
 

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What people haven't told you is that a Lab puppy is a different species from a Lab adult. TheDarkestMinds was being gentle by saying that Lab puppies are land sharks. They are in fact the spawn of the devil, a cross between a needle-toothed vampire and a goat - not only will they bite, but they'll eat everything. Read through ALL the links and steps that cookieface provided. I wrote that expressly for Labs. And, as a bonus, you may be able to train your pup to understand that whenever you Yelp, say Ouch, or Oops that you mean, 'I don't like that, please stop.'
 

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FWIW, my chi uses her yelp to mean "I don't like that" If someone she doesn't trust tries to pick her up, she screams. If another dogs takes her toy, she screams. I feel confident it is solid communication.

What people haven't told you is that a Lab puppy is a different species from a Lab adult. TheDarkestMinds was being gentle by saying that Lab puppies are land sharks. They are in fact the spawn of the devil, a cross between a needle-toothed vampire and a goat - not only will they bite, but they'll eat everything. Read through ALL the links and steps that cookieface provided. I wrote that expressly for Labs. And, as a bonus, you may be able to train your pup to understand that whenever you Yelp, say Ouch, or Oops that you mean, 'I don't like that, please stop.'
 

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FWIW, my chi uses her yelp to mean "I don't like that" If someone she doesn't trust tries to pick her up, she screams. If another dogs takes her toy, she screams. I feel confident it is solid communication.
It's solid communication. It's just that some dogs a human yelping/screaming apparently sounds more like wounded prey that needs killed or a squeak toy than another dog staying 'stop it'.
 

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What techniques have you been using? Be aware that puppies bite, often for a long time, and it can get worse around teething time (~5-7 months).

After a month im still not able to control my dog bitting. THe dog believes that bitting is short of a game and it bites hard. When it's not able to bite my hand it barks because it wants to bite it. Does this technique posted on youtube works?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXMyAvIlUSk
Does it work? Depends on the result you want: Do you want a scared, shut down dog? Yep, it might work. Do you want a dog that will fight back faster and harder? Yep, it might work for that.

On the other hand, do you want a dog who can control the frequency and strength of his biting? If so, look at the strategies outlined by HankSimon in my earlier post. Techniques used by by someone like Kikopup or Zak George are more appropriate and don't have the risk of fallout of the video you posted.
 

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Lab pups are VERY tough and think that everything is play. When my Lab mix was 9 weeks (!!!), he nipped and drew blood, thinking it was all great fun. As was the normal method ... 30 years ago, I slapped him on the butt. So, he snarled at me, decided the game was afoot, and nipped me again. I tried to escalate and he thought the game was fun. Then, I learned about the methods for Bite Inhibition, which cookieface posted, and followed that method step-by-step, making a few mistakes in the process. But, eventually, I learned to Yelp, withdraw attention, and communicate better. Based on successes that I had teaching this method (originally from Dr. Ian Dunbar) to a number of classes, I published an article in JustLabs. I condense that article for this Forum.

Please try this technique for about 3 days, then let us know what is NOT working. There are a lot of details and a lot of steps, but many people on this Forum have used this method with great success, especially with Labs! So, you'll have lots of help.

BTW, my Lab-mix is 14yo, and he has a very soft mouth. Moreover, even when hurt, he still has good Bite Inhibition and a soft mouth, thanks to this training method.
 

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No. Don't use that YouTube video. Listen to cookieface and hanksimon. And everyone else who gave you advice, for that matter. You're not going to get an instant fix, you need to be patient and consistent.
 
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