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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
[TL;DR]
The dog was triggered when my gf picked up her poop and did not give her the poop bag. She bit her for more than 2-3 minutes on her legs and arms until I could run across the street to put an end to it. Some bites got through the first layer of skin. This is not play-biting anymore. Is it maybe conflict aggression?

I'm trying to talk to a dog behaviorist/therapist. But want to know if ppl have been through similar situations, what have you tried, and what was the end result (positive, negative?)

[Context]
6-month-old shelter dog. She has lived in a yard with another older bigger dog. Had to fight for food. Very energetic, she would run after cats and play with other dogs until they would get tired and annoyed.
The girl that found her on the street would visit weekly and take her for walks. When greeting, the dog would jump on her and get hyper. There was a lot of play biting, which was not addressed and it got more annoying over time as she got bigger and bolder.

Got the dog home 2 weeks ago. I knew training would be crucial, as she had basically no manners, and at 15kg it's going to be a big problem. She stopped jumping on us as much, rewarding her for sitting, stopping the interaction when she jumped, by standing up and crossing arms.

But now she turned to biting the legs. I've started to predict when she turns into a landshark, and either prevent it from happening by de-escalating or when she's not responding by using the leash and creating distance. Incidents with me have decreased.
But with my gf it has gotten worse and worse. It usually starts with not getting something that she wants, and then "wrestling" my gf for it. And the worse it gets, the harder it is to stay still and ignore her. It just makes "the game" more hyper.

We're at the second serious strike. The third time she'll do this we will have to give up on her and give her for adoption. I really can't jeopardize my girlfriend's and other friends' safety as she seems to be getting worse and worse.
 

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When something doesn't work (staying still and ignoring the dog) then you need to move on to a different strategy.

When the dog is biting your GF what is your GF doing? Is she SAYING anything? Talk can escalate a situation and high pitched voice can as well. Wrestling for an item is counterproductive with a dog that wants something you have. I suggest that you start by teaching this dog the trade game. You can do this with a toy and food in the house. If the dog has a toy, you trade very good food for the toy and then give the toy back. Repeat. If the dog is snatchy (grabs the food and instantly if back on the toy) you may need to toss the food a little bit away from you to give you time to take ownership of the toy. When the dog comes back to you, give the toy back. Rinse and repeat. The dog never LOSES the prize (toy) and learn to give it up for something better (steak).

You should also teach this dog a few basic commands such as sit or down. As you solidify the sit and the down you can use these commands for impulse control.

Do not wrestle the dog for anything the dog has. Have good food on you to TRADE for what he has.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When something doesn't work (staying still and ignoring the dog) then you need to move on to a different strategy.

When the dog is biting your GF what is your GF doing? Is she SAYING anything? Talk can escalate a situation and high pitched voice can as well. Wrestling for an item is counterproductive with a dog that wants something you have. I suggest that you start by teaching this dog the trade game. You can do this with a toy and food in the house. If the dog has a toy, you trade very good food for the toy and then give the toy back. Repeat. If the dog is snatchy (grabs the food and instantly if back on the toy) you may need to toss the food a little bit away from you to give you time to take ownership of the toy. When the dog comes back to you, give the toy back. Rinse and repeat. The dog never LOSES the prize (toy) and learn to give it up for something better (steak).

You should also teach this dog a few basic commands such as sit or down. As you solidify the sit and the down you can use these commands for impulse control.

Do not wrestle the dog for anything the dog has. Have good food on you to TRADE for what he has.
She tried standing still and ignoring, but when the bites got worse, she couldn't help from trying to stop the behaviour by saying "No! Stop it!" Which I know, it did not help.

We've been playing the trading game, and teaching her to sit and wait for a game to start (fetch or tug of war). But it's only been 2 weeks and surely all of the obedience she knows is very fragile, that high stimulation can easily make useless. Sometimes not even a high-value treat can take her attention from something.

After more research, it may also be a case of zoomies with aggressive puppy nipping, post poop. She wasn't really interested in the poop bag, but rather she switched to demon mode. Some dogs get a boost of energy after pooping, and don't know what to do with it so they might go FRAP biting their owners :(
I've managed to reproduce it myself the same day, on the evening poop, by wiggling a bit the poop bag. She went for me and my legs and I could keep her at a distance with the leash, but I have long arms and can hold the 17kg "monster".
 

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Teach bite engagement with a toy instead of you.

Do this other times so when the dog becomes over excited she can be offered the toy snd can unload on the toy. I use a ball on a rope or a tug.

This is a toy the dog NEVER has unless playing with or working with you. When not playing or working with you the toy is put away out if sight where the dog cannot get it.
 
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