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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hey i just got a 2 month old golden retriever puppy 5 days ago and he is quite noisy. He crys often when left alone which is understandable but the most frustrating thing is him barking at us. It happens most often when i return from a walk or when one of us approaches him than he gets excited and barks at us. He just gets sometimes this bout of energy and starts barking at us or sometimes if hes trying to do something we dont allow he barks at us. i really dont want this to continue. what should i do?
 

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Lol sounds like he's trying to get you to play with him. Walks get boring for young puppies. Try playing games with him or start teaching him tricks or basic obedience commands- make it fun. Then put him in his crate afterwords for some down time. Teach him to settle down in his crate after playing a bit. He may like a gentle game of tug with a soft toy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Lol sounds like he's trying to get you to play with him. Walks get boring for young puppies. Try playing games with him or start teaching him tricks or basic obedience commands- make it fun. Then put him in his crate afterwords for some down time. Teach him to settle down in his crate after playing a bit. He may like a gentle game of tug with a soft toy.
thanks but if i start playing with him doesnt that reinforce the behavior? i dont want him to learn that barking=he gets to play
 

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No, you play when he isn't barking, then he won't need to play later, thus no more barking. Labs are high energy dogs, he will need at least ten minutes of every hour he's awake playing or training, preferably in short, 2-5 minute bursts due to a puppy's lack of attention span. That time will increase as he gets older.

Some dogs are simply more vocal that others, your put doesn't know any other way to communicate with you and, had probably just recently discovered he can do more than whine an yip so, he's trying out his new bark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, you play when he isn't barking, then he won't need to play later, thus no more barking. Labs are high energy dogs, he will need at least ten minutes of every hour he's awake playing or training, preferably in short, 2-5 minute bursts due to a puppy's lack of attention span. That time will increase as he gets older.

Some dogs are simply more vocal that others, your put doesn't know any other way to communicate with you and, had probably just recently discovered he can do more than whine an yip so, he's trying out his new bark.
thanks i will try play with him more, i dont have much time in the day to play but will do my best n hope he doesnt make this form of communication he discovered a habit.
 

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You can pay a dog walker or a neighbor to play with your puppy when you’re busy? It’s a high energy breed, he needs an outlet. You can also try enrichment puzzle games etc...
 

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A Golden is not a Lab, but many of the traits are similar.

It is common for a Golden to give 'backtalk' when he doesn't like something ... kind of like when a 2yo child learns to say "no!" ;-)

As suggested, you do want to interact, train, and play as much as you have time ... and not when barked at, preferably when barking stops ... which can be difficult.

There are some things you can do:
1. Teach him to bark on cue, and never give the cue.
2. Teach him the cue "Quiet" as well as a hand gesture for quiet. One method is to wait until he barks, put a small, smelly treat under his nose that he will sniff (and stop barking momentarily), then say Quiet and give him the treat. Repeat until he learns ... It will take a minimum of three days, but shouldn't take longer than 2 weeks to begin to get the knack.
3. When he barks to get general attention, say Oops or Quiet, and walk away to withdraw the desired attention. Again, it will take about 3 days for him to begin to understand, so be patient and persistent.
4. When he gives you backtalk, try to ignore the barking, while maintaining discipline. He is just a baby, so be gentle, but persistent. After you train him, if you ask him to Sit or to Come, etc. and he chooses to bark, then you can try to wait him out, to repeat the cue once, or to walk away (as described above) when he barks. You'll have to learn which approach is more appropriate for the 'petulant' pup, depending on the situation.
5. Be careful when he barks happily as a greeting. That is a Golden trait and part of their charm. If you teach him not to bark in these situations, you want to be gentle and avoid teaching him Not to be friendly. Having the person (or yourself) say oops! and disappear when barked at may work ..... But, many people won't be as disciplined as you, and may be enchanted by the happy, licking, barking puppy, encouraging his enthusiasm. Work with people that will listen to you and help you train (rather than spoil) your pup... Or suffer through 16 years of barking.... ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A Golden is not a Lab, but many of the traits are similar.

It is common for a Golden to give 'backtalk' when he doesn't like something ... kind of like when a 2yo child learns to say "no!" ;-)

As suggested, you do want to interact, train, and play as much as you have time ... and not when barked at, preferably when barking stops ... which can be difficult.

There are some things you can do:
1. Teach him to bark on cue, and never give the cue.
2. Teach him the cue "Quiet" as well as a hand gesture for quiet. One method is to wait until he barks, put a small, smelly treat under his nose that he will sniff (and stop barking momentarily), then say Quiet and give him the treat. Repeat until he learns ... It will take a minimum of three days, but shouldn't take longer than 2 weeks to begin to get the knack.
3. When he barks to get general attention, say Oops or Quiet, and walk away to withdraw the desired attention. Again, it will take about 3 days for him to begin to understand, so be patient and persistent.
4. When he gives you backtalk, try to ignore the barking, while maintaining discipline. He is just a baby, so be gentle, but persistent. After you train him, if you ask him to Sit or to Come, etc. and he chooses to bark, then you can try to wait him out, to repeat the cue once, or to walk away (as described above) when he barks. You'll have to learn which approach is more appropriate for the 'petulant' pup, depending on the situation.
5. Be careful when he barks happily as a greeting. That is a Golden trait and part of their charm. If you teach him not to bark in these situations, you want to be gentle and avoid teaching him Not to be friendly. Having the person (or yourself) say oops! and disappear when barked at may work ..... But, many people won't be as disciplined as you, and may be enchanted by the happy, licking, barking puppy, encouraging his enthusiasm. Work with people that will listen to you and help you train (rather than spoil) your pup... Or suffer through 16 years of barking.... ;-)
thanks so much for the tips! :)
 
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